Now my T is worth 3 plug nickles. Freeze plugs, that is.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Now my T is worth 3 plug nickles. Freeze plugs, that is.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 08:18 pm:

Blew the forward freeze plug on my 26/27 and decided to make an afternoon out of it. So, along with my son to provide the eyes, we set out to replace them with Indian Head or Bubbalo nickles.
As my WWI military vehicle project is a 1915 body car, we went with three 1915 nickles. On a 26/27 engine, that would make sense that a 10 year nickle would be common enough to use.

Here's the leaker. When we pulled them out, they were steel. Don't know if originals were brass or steel, so don't know if these are the originals. No sealant on them, for sure.



Pulled out the old ones by piercing with flathead screwdriver and popping them out. Clean up channels well with small wire brush on dremel tool.


Although I had a set of new brass plugs from Lang's, I went with the nickle option. I cheated a little and took the backside of each nickle to the benchgrinder and ground them down a little, just barely took off the image. Don't call the Secret Service on me, as they will have to pry them out of the engine block for evidence. Once ground, I placed the nickle on a socket that was just large enough to hold it up and smashed the backside with a ballpeen hammer. Just a few good hits with a 2 lb hammer and I was close to matching the shape of the new plugs.


The nickles were still a little larger than the holes in the block and I noticed the brass new plugs were a little larges as well. A few more hits with the hammer on the socket and we got the nickles to the correct size.


We placed a little black sealant inside the ridge in the block hole and placed the nicle in place and lightly tapped around the edges to get us agood, tight seal. Then, we placed the flat head of the hammer on the ridge in the center of the cikle and gave it just a few average taps with the 2 lb hammer and it was snug as a bug in a rug.

We repeated the process for the middle and rear plugs. The rear plug was fun due to the location of the dash, so a little creative manipulation of a socket extension, four hands, 20 fingers and two hammers, and we got it tapped in.
All three Indians in place facing forward.


And, we took the opportunity to put some stove black polish on the exhaust manifold, new glans and new gaskets and here she is, put back together. We'll wait a few hours for the sealant to cure, but as of this evening, with new coolant in, she hasn't sweated a drop. Thanks fo fellow forum members fo all the advice and patience in walking me through this.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 08:31 pm:

Looks great Robert. I have three vintage nickles on the cowl waiting to be installed. Today was spent on rear axle. Freeze plugs will come when Im waiting on parts.
Drive safe and often


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Monday, January 02, 2017 - 08:47 am:

I notice you faced the Indian heads out. Lets Hope those Buffalo's don't take a dump in your water jacket. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Monday, January 02, 2017 - 08:50 am:

You just did Steve proud!! LOL. How'd you get so lucky as to be able to find not one, but THREE '15 nickles?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Monday, January 02, 2017 - 11:19 am:

Luck has nothing to do with it, it's only money.

And if those buffalos take a dump in my block, well, I presume the Indians are armed and dangerous.

I'm fore concerned about driving the T back home in Leavenworth, KS where they keep some buffalo on the prison grounds and I don't know if my nickles are male or femaile and the T keeps pulling towards the prison fence headed up towards Kickapoo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, January 02, 2017 - 11:19 am:

I'm too "thrifty" to use nickels with dates on them. Thanks to an unfortunate design feature, a lot of these nickels have the dates worn off, resulting in little collector value. The last ones I bought were about 25 each.

Rather than hitting the coins with a hammer to dish them, I find it easier to control what I'm doing if I bend them with a press.

I've updated the web page on this: http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG87.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, January 02, 2017 - 04:35 pm:

A few years ago I discovered that the English two pense coin [also known as the tuppence] is perfect for a soft metal shim in the ball cap under the engine pan.

I already had a nice jewelry makers die for making spheres and three whacks with a ball peon hammer left me with a perfect shim. Being half Irish there was also a certain satisfaction of whacking the King on the head. :-)


Shim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, January 02, 2017 - 04:49 pm:

ha ... gotta love that spell check. :-)


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