OT-over the last several months, my focus has changed....

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: OT-over the last several months, my focus has changed....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Wednesday, January 04, 2017 - 09:56 pm:

This is no where related to Model T's, except that every relative I had in Nebraska owned one, two or more.....

In my little town of Milford, Nebraska, only one veteran didn't return home. He was my mom's first cousin, and his parents my great uncle and aunt. In a small town, everyone knows everyone, and everyone remembers...

this has no business here, yet is a tribute to a young man who might still be alive today.....

https://www.dropbox.com/s/wb5eyi985oillf2/Video%20Jan%2004%2C%201%2032%2053%20PM %20%281%29.mov?dl=0


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Derocher on Wednesday, January 04, 2017 - 10:11 pm:

That's a great tribute Rob. Thanks for posting it. I think every day of my own WW 2 Heroes who are all gone now. Jim Derocher, AuGres, MI


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Wednesday, January 04, 2017 - 10:25 pm:

Thanks for posting this, Rob. All of my Uncles came back from the war, and they're all gone now, together with many other veterans from the war, and I miss them all.

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Albert Lemon on Wednesday, January 04, 2017 - 10:28 pm:

Thanks Rob for the reminder that "Freedom isn't Free", even in the smallest of towns across America. Some of us that made it back alive from VN remember almost daily of the ones who didn't, they are never-ever forgotten. SEMPER FI Brother


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Fischer - Arroyo Grande, CA on Wednesday, January 04, 2017 - 10:50 pm:

Thank you for posting that, Rob.

Those stories always evoke a mixed emotion for me. I feel compelled to watch or listen, and yet doing so breaks my heart. I can't help thinking of the pain and loss to family and country in the death such fine young men.

Defense of our nation is sometimes an unavoidable necessity, but the cost of war goes on and on. The USA has accomplished many great things since 1945, but just consider how much greater we could have been if it were not for the lost contributions of many of our best and brightest.

Dick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Wednesday, January 04, 2017 - 11:08 pm:

Great stuff, Rob.

My family has a long military history, and the understanding of this was
late in coming to me, but I found a way to serve and it was everything I
hoped it would be ... hell, and every awful thing you would never want to
be exposed to, and the most exhilarating experience a person could ever
possibly know.

I reconciled myself to my own mortality and embraced dying with honor
as a higher calling than living an ordinary life, having never walked the walk.
Like Dick mentioned, I could not peel myself from the flight line fences any
time one of us was sent home under a flag. Something always got in my
eyes, and it stung, but the feeling was one of pride and brotherhood and
honor, and I hoped the families back home would share that pride and not
embrace it all as loss. We are all going to die. To do so in the noble pursuit
of honor is the finest way to give of ourselves. I was fully prepared to go home
in a box and hoped my family would not mourn me, but feel pride in my actions.

My good friend Bobby Foster always said: "Duty above all else, except Honor"

Is there any better way ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Wednesday, January 04, 2017 - 11:59 pm:

Reat post. Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Thursday, January 05, 2017 - 12:00 am:

Great post. Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Thursday, January 05, 2017 - 01:31 am:

Rob:

My dad "went over" in early September 1944 and only one month later he too was gone. I got a birthday card from him when he was in New York which was his port of embarkation. I was born on September 8, 1943 and I was having my first birthday party while he was in NY but he didn't get to attend that first birthday party nor any others I had. Since he was sent to the hell of Hurtgen Forest he died with over 33,000 other US solders in a lost cause that was well hidden for many years as to the true story of that worthless place. There is a hole in me that nothing can fill and I can tell you that I would give everything I own to just have one hug from him. My comfort as I grow older is that I get nearer to the time when I will get to meet him. Thanks for remembering Mr. Danner. I found out once that my dad won my mom's heart when he was acting in a high school play singing "Don't sit under the apple tree with anyone else but me" and she was in the audience swooning as he won her heart. It is the personal stories that keep his memory alive for me. If only he had spoken into a tape recorder somewhere I would be able to know what his voice sounded like but it wasn't to be. I hug my sons and grand kids and don't want them to not know me....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Thursday, January 05, 2017 - 06:42 am:

Thank you for that post Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthonie Boer --- Klaaswaal NL on Thursday, January 05, 2017 - 07:17 am:

He Robert Danner and others lost there lives for our FREEDOM !!!!
Toon


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Thursday, January 05, 2017 - 09:14 am:

Excellent post Rob, thank you and thanks to all servicemen and women for their service.

I saw a Willis Heyen in the football story, what relation is he to you?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Thursday, January 05, 2017 - 09:33 am:

There are wonderful people on this forum and in our hobby. Let's remember that throughout this new year, when we make postings and when we comment back to others. I'm proud to be here with you guys and I'll say a prayer for the pain that some of you feel, and are feeling, sometimes every day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Thursday, January 05, 2017 - 11:15 am:

I often look at the ordinary scenes of people in the Model T era that are posted here, and realize that they had no inkling of the way depression and World War II (and, in some cases, World War I) would upend their lives. Rob's post shows one instance of that personal upheaval. Thank you for showing it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Thursday, January 05, 2017 - 12:38 pm:

Freedom truly isn't free. I don't know how they did it back then. Different philosophy I guess. And I'm sure there were those in that day that thought like some do today, but if WWII were to happen today, we'd lose our @$$. So many today no longer have that resolve and sense of patriotism and commitment. Sad.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Thursday, January 05, 2017 - 01:00 pm:

Thanks for all the positive comments. John R., you have truly lived the tragedy of losing one of our finest. Burger, yes, duty honor country, choose your order.....

The remarkable thing is how life goes (went) on. While the Danner's lost one of their five sons, two were still serving in war theatres, and two more were in high school, and undoubtedly would have followed in their brothers tradition of service.

Willis was my dad's youngest brother. Dad and his two other brothers served during WWII, Willis graduated in 1945 at the age of 16. He joined the National Guard and retired as a Major.
Happy New Year old friends.....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Thursday, January 05, 2017 - 04:16 pm:

Rob, Thanks for a great and moving post.

When I read about others who made the ultimate sacrifice I remember my two classmate buddies who didn't return from VN. We sometimes think what could have been had they survived that day.

Our lives are here today and maybe tomorrow but I cherish every day thankful for another.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Thursday, January 05, 2017 - 04:49 pm:

Gene, your post reminded me of another veteran who never returned home.

Nile Kinnick Jr. won the Heisman Trophy in 1939 and was named the AP Greatest Athlete of the Year. Many believed Kinnick was destined for greatness. However he made a brave and fateful decision that deprived our nation of what may have been a future statesman. Amazing sacrifices were made by the greatest generation. Then they came home, put away their uniforms, and lived out their lives:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=6NNkwoOKlhU


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Thursday, January 05, 2017 - 05:32 pm:

My dad's brother and my mother's brother both served in the Navy in WWII. Both came home. My dad's cousin was training to be a glider plot when the wing folded during flight. I can vaguely remember his funeral held in the family's home. Many were killed during training but I don't recall seeing statistics on this but I am sure they exist. I feel for the families that lost their sons and daughters this way consequently missing the solace of knowing their loss was a justified war effort.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Thursday, January 05, 2017 - 07:42 pm:

I am the keeper of my Great Uncle Joe's WW2 things he was in the Signal Corp. He never talked about his time much but I think from what I can piece together he landed in Italy and worked up to Germany.
I can understand some of the "fresh off the boat" troops getting killed. One of my other Uncle had just gotten off the transport, someplace in France I think, and was captured by the Germans. By the end of the war the fresh troops were really getting pushed through training.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Perry Goble on Thursday, January 05, 2017 - 09:07 pm:

All most every one my generation remembers or new relatives that served in WWII . my mothers farther was in his forty's and went in as privet , My mothers cousin Guy was a B17 pilot , he and his Copilot were killed but they were able to keep the plain flying long enough for the rest of the cure to jump out. Her cousin Cliford ship was hit by a kamikaze and almost sank . My Dads older brother Bub started in the carvery ,the real carvery with horses . He told me the most important then was not to lose your horse . My Dads father left his home he loved in the Texas hill country were he had been ranching and farming all his life to go and work in the ship yards in Houston to help the war effort . My Dad severed in the Marine Corps in Korea and VN . My Cousin Mike three years older then me was killed not far from were my father was in VN . My father broke the news to Mikes Dad . I remember Mike as a fun loving kid . One day he was Hight school student a few mounts later he was gone . I have a picture of hem in his dress blues , he looks so proud . All these hero's are gone now . But not in my memory . I close with tears in my eyes .God bless them all .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Friday, January 06, 2017 - 07:46 am:

My grandfather served in the Navy during WWII, as did 5 of his 6 brothers. The oldest was too old to go. We have a copy of their local paper with pictures of all six in their uniforms and a short article about 6 brothers all serving. One was killed in France, the others returned home safely. My father and I both served in peace time. He in the mid 50's. Me in the early 80's. My son fought in Iraq and Afghanistan and returned home safely. Didn't watch a lot of news while he was gone. Just didn't want to see it. Of course, now he is a police officer and a week doesn't go by where there's not news of one of them being shot. There were pictures on Facebook of my son handing the flag to the widow of one of the deputies killed in Peach County, GA a couple of months ago.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Friday, January 06, 2017 - 09:18 am:

Oops, on re-reading that, it sounds as if all 6 brothers were in the Navy. They were in various branches, but all 6 served in WWII. Sorry.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Friday, January 06, 2017 - 09:24 am:

Hal,
My story is somewhat similar. My dad, two of his three brothers, his brother in law, and both my mothers brothers all served, and were in combat zones. One of mom's two brothers was in Korea. As I mentioned above, dad's other brother served in the National Guard for over twenty years.

I was on active duty and in the Guard for a total of eleven years and was in law enforcement for years (uniformed and investigator). Several of my cousins also served.

If you do not listen to the entire speech, listen to the first couple of sentences. Douglas MacArthur's farewell address to the 1962 Class at West Point. He was 82 years old, nearing the end of his life.

"Duty, Honor, Country....., those three hallowed words...."

https://www.dropbox.com/s/9u6j1acptwk24q9/Video%20Jul%2011%2C%206%2038%2033%20AM.mp4?dl=0


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Friday, January 06, 2017 - 09:34 am:

Gary: You are right about the training deaths. My Father was a Flight Instructor during WW2. He flew for 10hrs a day, 6 days a week for over 18 months in Courtland AL. He said that one night they lost 13 pilots. Took a couple months to find out what happen to some of them. Dad was a pilot before the war and strange he never flew a plane after the war. He said he had enough. He did get lucky to be transferred into the first class of Helicopter Instructors for the R4 the Army trained.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Friday, January 06, 2017 - 09:36 am:

History in if only my mind makes me think Mac Auther should have been fired after not heading warnings after Pearl?? Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Codman on Friday, January 06, 2017 - 10:01 am:

A great tribute Rob. My wife's family had three siblings (all three) in WW2. Two were not stationed in combat zones, the third was a Naval fighter pilot in the Pacific. All returned safely. My brother Frank was stationed in Korea in 1950. While his physical injuries were minor, he came back a different person. PTSD is real.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Friday, January 06, 2017 - 11:34 am:

My Dad and my uncles all served in WWII. My Dad was badly wounded when he was shot down over Lille France in early '43 and spent two years as a German POW. Pictures of him after the war show him weighing 85 lbs. He had so much flak in him he would set off the metal detectors in airports. He was a gunner on a B-26 Marauder


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Burg on Saturday, January 07, 2017 - 09:46 pm:

Thanks Rob and John for the memory's of your family members/Father and all the rest who has added to this wonderful post.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dale Peterson College Place, WA on Sunday, January 08, 2017 - 01:20 am:

My uncle, Dale Jensen Peterson, entered the army infantry in 1944 right out of high school. He was fighting in Germany when his platoon was pinned down by machine gun fire. He crossed an open field and took out the pill boxes. Returning with prisoners, he was shot by a sniper on April 13, just days before the end of the war in Europe. He was given the bronze star for his actions. He and his three brothers were very close. I sure would have liked to have known him as well. One of the brothers is still alive, Uncle LaVar, he is the one that got me interested in Model T's.


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