OT - "WORLDS finest MASS produced TOURING SEDAN"

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: OT - "WORLDS finest MASS produced TOURING SEDAN"
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine on Thursday, January 05, 2017 - 03:35 pm:

https://www.hemmings.com/classifieds/cars-for-sale/chrysler/70/1888748.html#&gid =1&pid=9


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Thursday, January 05, 2017 - 08:13 pm:

Pretty car. I guess the "world's finest" is in the eye of the beholder. As for firsts, 4-wheel hydraulic brakes, I believe so. Pressure oil system ? Not so much . . .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Thursday, January 05, 2017 - 09:37 pm:

I know that it is silly, and pointless. But I hate it when people use the phrase "touring sedan" incorrectly on antique cars. There were a lot of cars in the '30s, and clear up to the modern day, that did use the phrase. But it is very unlikely that that car was called "touring sedan" by anyone in the 1920s. In those days, and before, almost everybody knew what a "touring" car was. And almost everybody knew what a "sedan" was. Yeah, marketing and advertising even then liked to use a lot of other words like "phaeton", or "coach", and "torpedo" and especially "speedster" to confuse the point. But before 1930, "sedan" meant a fixed roof encloseable car. And "touring" meant an open or collapsible roof car with a front and a rear seat.
That changed in the 1930s. However, most people calling a car of this era a "touring sedan" is mostly showing off his lack of era knowledge and is following bad advice.

The four-wheel hydraulic brakes thing? A little yes, a little no. Chrysler wasn't the first. Chrysler cars wasn't even Chrysler when Duesenberg first used hydraulic brakes on a racing car. And Walter P was just taking over the "to become Chrysler Maxwell" when Duesenberg first put hydraulic brakes on true road cars (1921). It has, however, been argued that Chrysler was the first low-priced car, or the first real production car, to use hydraulic brakes. Those arguments do have some merit, but depend a little on how one draws those lines. Several marques began offering hydraulic brakes on cars in 1924.
With Walter P taking over, trying to save what had been one of the leading manufacturers of automobiles for nearly two decades, they did take the lead in quality engineering in designing their new cars. At least, on lower end cars, depending on where and how you draw that line.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil McKay on Friday, January 06, 2017 - 11:08 am:

" The 6 cylinder engine was 'PRESSURE' lubricated, also a first in the industry." Incorrect by 19 years!

Marmon patented, in 1905, and used and licensed "pressure" lubrication from that time onward. By pressure lubrication, I mean a geared oil pump, drilled oil passages in the crankshaft, etc. It is arguably the most significant (and unknown) innovation that Marmon contributed to automotive technology.

And yes, I am aware of the rear view mirror used on Marmon Wasp that won the first Indy 500 in 1911 and commonly claimed to be a "first."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Blanchard on Friday, January 06, 2017 - 11:30 am:

The roadster version of the 70 will be my next purchase... But first I need to recover from Santa's bill. Then I can get my toy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Friday, January 06, 2017 - 12:16 pm:

From the little information I have at hand, I don't think Chrysler used the "70" until Dec 1925, the 24 was a Model B. Chrysler replaced the Chalmers and was introduced in Jan of 1924. The 4 body styles were; Imperial Sedan (4 door), Roadster, Phaeton and Brougham (2 door). The open cars were "capable of 70 MPG". :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Friday, January 06, 2017 - 12:30 pm:

Until they threw a rod ? Packard, Buick and probably a few others were capable of attaining that speed in '24 under the right conditions but none could hold it for long - even if the road was suitable. Long strokes and babbit bearings !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Friday, January 06, 2017 - 01:59 pm:

Neil

Glad you put that Marmon racer use of rear view mirror as that so-called 'First'.

That myth continues, as no one questions the 'fact' that Ray Harroun was the first to use a rear view mirror!

Perhaps the better truth is on the Wasp his was the first race car to use it. :-)

But rear view mirrors, known early as diminishing mirrors, or backward looking mirrors were on autos in 1904, or likely earlier. And some goggles in 1905 had small mirrors fitted so the driver could look behind him too.


MoToR magazine, March 1907.




The Automobile, 1906.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Saturday, January 07, 2017 - 10:44 am:

Dan -- Another early term for rear-view mirrors was "hind view" mirrors. I always thought that was a cute name for them. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Saturday, January 07, 2017 - 11:21 am:

Mike

Forgot about that one, neat too, hind quarters!

Here is that term used, 1917



And this design, also 1917, forerunner of the auto dimming mirrors of today!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Saturday, January 07, 2017 - 11:25 am:

"Cop spotter" That one I have seen in print in era catalog. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil McKay on Sunday, January 08, 2017 - 09:06 pm:

Constanstine provided the Hemmings source for a Chrysler B. When I look at the ad for this car on Hemmings website, I am unable to see any info on how to contact the owner. Am I missing something, or did the seller fail to provide contact info?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Sunday, January 08, 2017 - 09:42 pm:

Yes it's right over on the right, green box.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil McKay on Sunday, January 08, 2017 - 11:04 pm:

Thanks, Mark. Senior brain strikes again. Neil


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