Old Photo - Battered Copper Cadillac

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Old Photo - Battered Copper Cadillac
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, January 06, 2017 - 10:48 pm:

Brockton, Mass. This poor car has been abused !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Howard D. Dennis Byron, Georgia on Friday, January 06, 2017 - 11:47 pm:

That is a very famous insignia on this WWI veteran Cadillac.

http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/223866-star-and-indian-h ead-insignia-of-the-2nd-infantry-division-aef/

Howard Dennis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Saturday, January 07, 2017 - 12:40 am:

Wow!
GREAT photo, Burger, and Howard, a very interesting history I'd never heard about before. We may think we know about arm-patch service insignia, but Howard's link tells a whole lot more. If you're a 'history buff', definitely worthwhile! Thanks!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, January 07, 2017 - 12:42 am:

Funny how a person can be blind to some things ! I saw a white
star with part of the paint peeled off (or similar) !!! Totally missed
the Indian's head ! Worse yet, I saw this insignia on unit buildings
and equipment in AFG ! I should have spotted it straight up !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Victor Bloxsome on Saturday, January 07, 2017 - 03:07 am:

Where are we ? I see a right hand steering wheel , and the Cad on the correct ( for us down under ) LH side of the street ...........
and the sign which welcomes WOMEN ( not LADIES ) shows that the neg has not been reversed .

Victor .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Saturday, January 07, 2017 - 03:26 am:

Victor,
If I remember rightly, Cadillac was RHD until 1915.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Saturday, January 07, 2017 - 09:00 am:

Looks like it's been through a few hearty car chases! Wonder what's up with the "women" sign in the background...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Saturday, January 07, 2017 - 09:38 am:

The women sign is the bush that is the outdoor restroom for the ladies, The mens is the tree on the other side of the park! :-)

I wonder if the car was shipped home after the war? What is the bracket on the center of the running board?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Howard D. Dennis Byron, Georgia on Saturday, January 07, 2017 - 09:39 am:

Every since this was discovered I've loved sharing the story of it's survival. Googling "WWI survivor Cadillac" also shows many images. Check these two:

https://history.gmheritagecenter.com/wiki/index.php/The_Only_Known_Surviving_WWI _Cadillac

https://blog.hemmings.com/index.php/2014/07/18/last-remaining-world-war-i-cadill ac-to-go-on-national-historic-vehicle-register/

Howard Dennis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Warren on Saturday, January 07, 2017 - 09:55 am:

"COPPER CADILLAC" Love it thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Howard D. Dennis Byron, Georgia on Saturday, January 07, 2017 - 10:09 am:

To get this back to Model T related this picture and the story of the Cadillac is where I first learned of the drafting of civilian vehicles in WWI. I marked my Maxwell according to these instructions.

The Vehicle markings have been reproduced to the exact specification for AEF Vehicle markings from the US Army manual.

The 2 digit indicates that the vehicle is a utility truck less than one ton. The 106 indicates that this is the 106th vehicle under this classification in the company or train to which the vehicle is attached. The X designates the vehicle as a civilian vehicle taken into military use.

Howard Dennis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Landry, Hudson, NH on Saturday, January 07, 2017 - 10:13 am:

Not even a street there any more. Part of City Hall Plaza. The only clue was the corner of City Hall. Took a bit to figure out which corner it had to be.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Archer Hayward, CA. on Saturday, January 07, 2017 - 08:40 pm:

In case any one is interested in seeing the insignia being discussed, here's a well preserved original on my original WWI Marine uniform. Sorry I couldn't find a closer shot of it. The picture was taken at the San Jose, CA. Veterans Day Parade as I prepare to carry the colors for our WWI Color Guard. NO, I'M NOT A MILITARY VETERAN. That title is reserved for those brave men and woman that risk(ed) and or sacrifice(d) their lives in order to preserve our invaluable freedom in our great country, that unfortunately some people just take for granite. What our group does is meant to honor the memory of our brave WWI Veterans and keep their memory and the memory of "The War to end all wars" alive.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Henderson, Dunbarton, NH on Sunday, January 08, 2017 - 07:13 am:

I believe it is a left hand drive 1918 Cadillac Type 57 as stated in the Hemmings article, Howard D. Dennis Byron posted.


In response, Cadillac built more than 2,500 Cadillac Type 57s in 1918 specifically for use by officers in the American Expeditionary Forces traveling to France to fight in The Great War. These Cadillacs all designated as military vehicles by the M in their serial numbers and equipped with the lauded 70-hp 314-cu.in. V-8 were built as knock-down vehicles for ease of shipping overseas and differed from regular Type 57s by the auxiliary fuel tank mounted to their running boards, but have since gone extinct. Nearly 2,100 of them went to France (the remainder were sent to U.S. bases and to Canada), and after the war were disposed of at near-scrap values in Europe, so to date no complete and original M-type Cadillac has been verified.

Happy motoring,

Warren


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond on Monday, January 09, 2017 - 04:49 am:

Dennis it looks like a boot scraper....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Monday, January 09, 2017 - 07:55 am:

Thanks Gary that would make sense that it's a boot scraper. Wouldn't want to get mud on or in the car! :-)


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration