Old Photo - Model T Era - Areoplane And Automobile Filling Station

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Old Photo - Model T Era - Areoplane And Automobile Filling Station
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Tuesday, January 10, 2017 - 09:50 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Tuesday, January 10, 2017 - 09:53 am:

That looks like a Waco 10 for anyone curious.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Tuesday, January 10, 2017 - 10:24 am:

Hi Tim,

Yes, it does.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Tuesday, January 10, 2017 - 11:49 am:

They may both be Wacos, but not the same type. The top wing the upper photo has parallel leading and trailing edges. The one in the lower photo is double-tapered.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Tuesday, January 10, 2017 - 12:48 pm:

Hi Gil,

Yes, you are correct about the difference in upper wing shapes. I was paying most attention to the distinctive landing gear. The Waco 10 was (I think) the first small aircraft to have hydraulic shock absorbers in the landing gear. What looks like a long strut rising from behind the wheel contains the shock absorber.

The plane may be a Waco 10 Taperwing. Prior to 1928 Waco used sequential numbers to designate different models. In 1928 Waco adopted an alphabet soup of three letter "names" for different models and variations within models (fuselage type, wing design, engine type). You need a decoder ring to figure out one from another.

They were, and the survivors still are, very good aircraft.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Tuesday, January 10, 2017 - 01:47 pm:

Find your decoder ring here:
http://www.aerofiles.com/wacodata.html

I missed out on a chance to fly in a Waco 10 once for some really dumb reason (I forget exactly what) but hopefully I'll still have the opportunity sometime to go up in one. Much like certain antique cars, Wacos must have been good planes to have been kept around all through the years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Tuesday, January 10, 2017 - 06:39 pm:

I've ridden in some early biplanes, but - alas - never a Waco. I used to have a World War II army training glider, a Laister-Kaufmann LK-10A, military designation TG-4A. I was typically towed aloft by a Cessna Birddog of the Korean era, which was a fine towplane. But once I went to a vintage glider meet, where they were using a Waco Taperwing as a towplane. It was a treat to see that gorgeous biplane out ahead of me, but that Waco was pretty borderline with a two-seat glider behind it. I doubt we could climb as much as 250 feet a minute. I was practically chanting aloud: If the rope breaks here, I'll go to that field. If it breaks here, I'll go - let's see - I'll try for that spot. If it breaks here, I'll - - - . By the time we got to a safe release altitude, I was an older man!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond on Wednesday, January 11, 2017 - 06:29 am:

Gilbert you know faith can move mountains! lol Gary


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