Let’s Talk About Jacks

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Let’s Talk About Jacks
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick J. Gunter -- Sparta, Missouri, USA on Wednesday, January 11, 2017 - 05:02 pm:

I know we have discussed (argued about?) jacks supplied with the Model T toolkit before but I’m still a little fuzzy about a few things. Here is a photo of a Buckeye jack I recently acquired, marked “07A.” Is this a Model T jack and if so, what year? Also, some questions I am wondering if we have ever reached a consensus on:

What years did Ford supply Buckeye jacks? Did it start in 1913? What year(s) were the Buckeye jacks with the block lettered “FORD” issued? What jack followed the “FORD” labeled jack? Was it identical but without the “FORD?”

BuckeyeJack


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Thursday, January 12, 2017 - 10:09 am:

The one you have pictured isn't a Ford model. The one with the block letters Ford is. I don't think there is any data at the archives on the Ford jacks, and when the Buckeye jacks were last used. My guess is most likely 1914 is the last year for Buckeye and Fords. The one I've had difficulty with is the 25-27 jacks. A standard T jack is 10" in the down position, but if you have 21" wheels and a flat tire, the jack will not fit, but the photos in the late T parts books seem to indicate it was 10". Then there is the debate on the flip top jacks! Oh well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, January 12, 2017 - 10:37 am:


These Model T jacks I carry in my cars are very common. I don't know when they began, but the encyclopedia says the pressed steel jacks that replaced them began in 1925. I don't recall actually seeing one of those personally. They must have a lousy survival rate.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Thursday, January 12, 2017 - 10:55 am:

This should be an uplifting topic.

Sorry, couldn't resist.

We pulled a few jacks out of the family parts barn and I have no idea what is T or A or other. I'll post some photos to add them to the mix.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Thursday, January 12, 2017 - 12:17 pm:

That's what I use too, Steve. I just like the way they look and work. I'm a sucker for mechanical do-dads and the more exposed moving parts, the better.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, January 12, 2017 - 01:09 pm:

I use the special TT jack:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Thursday, January 12, 2017 - 02:22 pm:

Thought that was a pump at first glance.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Thursday, January 12, 2017 - 03:50 pm:

These are some of the ones I got. Can't feel any markings on them at all. I've also got a rectangular lever action jack that is stamped steel, that I presume must be later. I think I got it in my WWII jeep.

Would any of these three be period correct for a T?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul iverson freeport ill. on Thursday, January 12, 2017 - 08:19 pm:

Robert I think the ww2 jeep jack looks just like the outer ones in your pic not sure of the size


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Thursday, January 12, 2017 - 11:22 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick J. Gunter -- Sparta, Missouri, USA on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 11:36 am:

Okay, take a look at this one. It is exactly like the "FORD" marked Buckeye Jack number 00, except it does NOT say Ford. Was this one part of the toolkit for awhile? If so, how long did they supply the Ford marked jack? (I know this is a hard question and may be impossible to research.) I have assumed that this jack is correct for 1913-14 toolkits. And of course: the wood handle on this is not correct.
NonFord01NonFord02


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 12:08 pm:

Did any of these Jack's have a convex base originally? So many seem to today. Did the casting draw upon cooling or is it from repeatedly being pushed off the jack rather than lowering it first?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Codman on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 12:13 pm:

I use the one that came with an '86 GMC pickup. Not period correct, but it could have been made for the T


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 09:11 pm:

Hal, I believe they were all flat bases. I found a cast one like those Steve posted. It still had an almost complete coat of black paint and absolutely no wear where the gear runs on the stem, so it was as new. The base was flat.

If you find one which is curved, be sure to use red heat when straightening it. The cast iron ones will break if bent cold.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 09:15 pm:

The jack that Rick posted is exactly like the Ford jacks I have. I got a Ford one not long ago that had all bad springs in it. As I recall, there are three. I borrowed a jack like Rick pictured above to make new springs. Today, it's a nice working jack. And just for the record, they were painted silver!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 09:31 pm:

Here is an image from the February 1912 Ford Times. It says No. 03:



Here is another ad for the Buckeye Jack No. 03:



Rick, what makes you think the wood handle is not correct? Look at the bottom left of the page and order a dozen of No. H3 for all your friends...



: ^ )

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Hagerty on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 10:39 pm:

Keith,
Any idea what is the third item on the first page shown above? With the JOEY-MELL name.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Bergmann Sydney - Australia on Sunday, January 15, 2017 - 06:22 am:

David The answer is here - from 2014 - http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/411944/430784.html?1395145625


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Sunday, January 15, 2017 - 09:43 am:

Jacks?.......we don't need no stinking Jacks! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Hagerty on Sunday, January 15, 2017 - 10:39 am:

Thanks Tom,
I thought it looked like it could be a whistle of some sort. I couldn't determine just how big or small the item is in the ad photo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Sunday, January 15, 2017 - 11:40 am:

What could possibly go wrong?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charles W. Little South Paris, Maine on Sunday, January 15, 2017 - 12:47 pm:

Here's my 2 cents.

Ford didn't include a jack early on. Buckeye offered the 03 for sale, and advertised in the early Ford Times. Kim Dobbins has an 03 with "Ford Detroit" on it, and had one he sold about a year ago. But those are the only two marked ones I am aware of. The photo is from Kim.

In 1913 Ford offered a jack as part of the included tools. The 00, marked Ford. It is a lighter weight jack than the 03. The tool list indicated a separate handle. It is the silver one in the photo

Somewhere around 1915-16, the "one piece" jack (integral handle) like Steve Jelf has pictured above became standard--until the pressed steel jack around 1925.

j


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick J. Gunter -- Sparta, Missouri, USA on Sunday, January 15, 2017 - 11:54 pm:

Keith,
I didn't know Buckeye used a wood handle. I assumed they all used the steel handle like Charles'es photo above. So, now I'm wondering which jacks came with the steel handle. If most of them were wood, that would explain why most of these jacks are missing a handle. They either wore out quickly, or were lost.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Monday, January 16, 2017 - 09:42 am:

I have personally seem a letter at the archives in which Ford announced to their dealers that for 1913 Ford was going to supply a jack and for open cars a top boot. Ford also stated in that letter that the dealer could make a requisition for jacks and tops for any car shipped after October 1 of 1912 but not for any car shipped before that since those cars were not 1913 models.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Monday, January 16, 2017 - 10:26 am:

I'm wondering if the larger jack of Kims wasn't made for the model K? Many jack handles have been lost, and replaced with wood.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Erfert on Monday, January 16, 2017 - 05:43 pm:

I wonder if the metal handle might have been so it could be operated with a foot rather then kneeling and pumping with the hand?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Monday, January 16, 2017 - 06:18 pm:

I always thought the metal handle might double as a tire iron...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Monday, January 16, 2017 - 06:23 pm:

No one has mentioned Jack Putnum or Jack Daron yet


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, January 16, 2017 - 07:56 pm:

Why, ... do they have wood handles too ? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Wetherbee - Downeast Maine on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 - 10:50 am:

I think that Buckeye advertised a wood handle in the pre-T era which could fit with your jack. Pretty sure that it's an aftermarket item though...


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