Home Made tools

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Home Made tools
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Horlick in Penn Valley, CA on Thursday, January 12, 2017 - 05:38 pm:

I think we all, or most of us , make tools to accomplish repetitive tasks on our model T. I and many others have posted their version of a clutch spring compressor.

Today during a short respite in our deluge out here in Northern California I decided to work on changing my 21" rim flat tire.



Whilst using my old trusty home made split rim pry tool I got to thinking that it might be of interest to post a photo so all you 21" demountable guys can make your own tool. It makes removing the rim and centering it for reinstallation a snap!

Grab a hefty rod and turn the end in your lathe. Then heat the other end red and beat it with a hammer. Voila, handy dandy tool!



The flatened end prys the rim on or off.



The rounded end fits into the bolt hole in the felloe and makes lining the lugs up with the bolts
very easy.



I carry this with me in my running board tool box and use it whenever I have to mess with demountables.

Now it's your turn to show a clever tool you have made.

TH


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Thursday, January 12, 2017 - 06:10 pm:

This is a centering tool for the cylinder front cover that I made from an old steel pulley. The OD of the pulley just happened to fit perfectly in the timer recess of the cover. All I had to do was put the pulley in my lathe and open up the shaft hole to fit onto the end of the camshaft.

I happened to have these pictures saved on my computer. I'll have to rummage around in my shop to see what else out there is worthy of photographing.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Thursday, January 12, 2017 - 06:58 pm:

I didn't make this, it was in the family parts barn and I posted a photo to see what it was. Consensus was a Bubba petcock turning thingy a maiggy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Thursday, January 12, 2017 - 09:46 pm:

When Jack Chidgey arrived in San Diego in the 70's he gave out "Chidgey Oil Checkers" to all the local Model T owners. They looked very similar to your oil checker, I think I still have one somewhere in the barn.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Friday, January 13, 2017 - 03:31 am:

I made this one when I had my 15 tourer. Can you guess its purpose.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, January 13, 2017 - 05:27 am:

Screwdriver for difficult bendix cover screw?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Friday, January 13, 2017 - 05:37 am:

Would be good for that Harold but if Allans 1915 was factory, no starter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Friday, January 13, 2017 - 06:37 am:

Frank is correct. No starter on my 15.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Friday, January 13, 2017 - 09:09 am:

How is it possible that the spokes are still tight on that wheel. Looks scary as hell. I have had wheels that look great but the spokes click at every revolution.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Doolittle on Friday, January 13, 2017 - 09:22 am:

Look again- see the spacers on the ends of the spokes?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, January 13, 2017 - 12:03 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Dugger on Friday, January 13, 2017 - 01:26 pm:

Steve that is a left handed saw, is there a right handed version


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Friday, January 13, 2017 - 02:21 pm:

Looks like a tool used to set the electric horn vibrator adjusting nut.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Hagerty on Friday, January 13, 2017 - 02:28 pm:

Bill, Good question!
Actually... Steve's saw can be either left or right hand... just unbolt the parts and move them to the other side.
:^)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Friday, January 13, 2017 - 03:21 pm:

For the righties….

1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Hagerty on Friday, January 13, 2017 - 03:30 pm:

Eric,
Good job! I was hoping that would happen!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, January 13, 2017 - 03:58 pm:

Eric - Yours is a completely different brand! The other one was a "STIHL" but yours is a "SHITZ"!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Hagerty on Friday, January 13, 2017 - 04:05 pm:

Darn You Harold!
You almost made coffee come out my nose!
And I even looked at the name already... didn't see it...
Good one... still laughing!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Friday, January 13, 2017 - 06:00 pm:

Right on RV.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 07:23 pm:

This is a useful tool for transmission work



This is it in use


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 08:49 pm:

Tony, Is that used to compress the spring? If so it looks like a good idea.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 10:36 pm:

Yes. Works great.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Cascisa - Poulsbo, Washington on Sunday, January 22, 2017 - 02:01 am:

I finally got around to getting some photos.

The first tool is used for positioning the U-Joint while attaching the rear end assembly to the engine.




This next tool was made from a hub and spindle bearing wrench.
It is deep enough to go over the spindle to install the outer bearing.

It also fits the camshaft retaining nut.



Be_Zero_Be

:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Monday, January 23, 2017 - 01:32 pm:

These are running rulers the metal one is from a pizza cutter that just happen to be one revolution equaled one foot. I used this to measure the inside of the rim to determine the spoke centers. The actual measurement is 69 51/64 this is the base of the math formula to determine the spoke centers.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Tuesday, January 24, 2017 - 08:20 pm:

Another useful tool. Today one side of this got too hot and the insulation failed. I am buying new wire as I don't have an old starter solenoid available, only $21 with free shipping on eBay.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Horlick in Penn Valley, CA on Sunday, January 29, 2017 - 01:36 pm:

Tony, just flash the wires to the DC power source a few times. That gives the best magnetizing and keeps resistance generated heat down!

TH


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Rose on Sunday, January 29, 2017 - 02:11 pm:

My muffler bearingMuffler Bearing


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Sunday, January 29, 2017 - 08:56 pm:

OK It's a tool for a tool. Got it from the Handyman's mag. Bottom cap is removable for cleaning if necessary.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry P on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 - 07:39 pm:

Some interesting tools guys. I will use some of your ideas when the need presents itself. Thanks for sharing.
I am a little reluctant to show this tool I made a few years back when I installed the new tires on my 26/27 Tudor. I really didn't have a clue how to go about it and I think there was supposed to be some sort of tab that held the split rim from moving as you put the tire on. Anyway, as I progressed I realized that I had to spread the rim so that the two ends of the rim would go together. I came up with this idea that did the job. I'm sure there is a better way to do it but this was how I did it.picture of the tool I made for pushing split rim aparttool attached to the rim for demonstration purpose


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Wednesday, February 01, 2017 - 07:11 am:

Larry, our US friends may not know of the necessity for your tool. US 21" rims did not have the two holes either side of the split in the rim to allow your tool to engage in them. There was a special tool for Canadian split rims to draw the split rim ends together so the pin could be inserted in the joining lug. These tools are very rare. I have seen one in all my T days.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry P on Wednesday, February 01, 2017 - 09:37 am:

Interesting! Thanks Allan! I have to find one more rim for my spare tire so when I look I will know what to look for. Would anyone have a picture of that "joining lug" to share here. Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Wednesday, February 01, 2017 - 06:32 pm:

Larry, the joining lug looks very similar to an improved T door hinge. The rim tool pulls the rim joint together and the 'hinge pin' is inserted just as it would be in a hinge.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry P on Wednesday, February 01, 2017 - 06:55 pm:

Ahhh, yes! I can see how that would work! On a few of my rims there were some pieces of iron riveted to the ends but something had broken off in bygone years so I didn't know what belonged there. Probably someone was fixing tires without that special tool!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Wednesday, February 01, 2017 - 06:58 pm:

Hi Larry P,

This is the factory tool which Allan speaks of above. He likely posted this picture originally.





And the Canadian Split Rim with the distinctive holes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry P on Wednesday, February 01, 2017 - 09:14 pm:

Wow! That is quite the apparatus! Looks kind of Medieval! It must have been a bit of a trick to lock them pins into both sides at the same time? That C shaped metal must have been used to hold the inner part in the holes while you worked on getting the outer pin into its hole while squeezing that together then moving the handle to pry apart and then with the other hand put the hinge pin into its place assuming you have it lined up right! That had to be a two man job! No wonder they are rare! I can visualize a lot of them getting thrown as far as one could throw them during a fit of rage! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Thursday, February 02, 2017 - 02:21 am:

Larry, the U shaped clip is used to hold the handles together once the split is closed. It is slid up one side until it engages the other. With the tool holding the rim closed, you have two hands to manipulate the pin.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Horlick in Penn Valley, CA on Wednesday, February 15, 2017 - 07:04 pm:

I did something stupid today and spent about an hour fishing with a magnet and cranking rags through the engine. All to no avail. So I pulled the hogshead off and fished with the commercial magnet for over an hour. No bites!

Commercial magnet tool:



Frustrated and dreading pulling the engine out I went to my shop and grabbed some scraps, in 3 minutes I had a new tool:



Next I went back to the car and caught the limit on my first dip!



I think this tool is a keeper! It fits down between the flywheel and the pan. The transmission cover must be off for this tool to be used.

TH


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry P on Wednesday, February 15, 2017 - 10:39 pm:

Now that is a good idea!


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