Old Photo - American Ambulance Field Service Ambulance

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Old Photo - American Ambulance Field Service Ambulance
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Friday, January 13, 2017 - 10:14 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Friday, January 13, 2017 - 04:26 pm:

Might that be Walt Disney?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Will Brown on Friday, January 13, 2017 - 04:47 pm:

Here is another example. My father drove one in France in 1918. This is not my father.
Here is his account from his diary:
I jumped into one of Henry Ford's ambulances and took the road from Acy {Acy-en-Multien] to Rosoy [Resoy-en-Multien] to May [May-en-Multien]. Then the main Paris Road to Lizy. Then from Lizy to Crocherel to La Ferto Road which runs direct to the Château. Straight to little crossroads to Coupru. There we left the machine and proceeded to an artillery implacement near hill 208. We were then on high ground 3 miles from Vaux and 4 miles from the town of Château Thiery. We were high in the air and the battle line was laid out in front of us like [a] map.
Shell[s] were bursting around the hill all the time. We soon were able to tell when a shell passed over whether it was one of our own or a German. The infantry could be seen by the fire of the rifles. When we arrived at the hill it was about 12:30 [a.m.]. The Germans had just finishing and artillery preparation on the American lines held by the 26th Division they were just going over the top. Noman’s land was as light as day because of the Very lights and the Star Shells. The Germans could be seen advancing. They came first in extended order. These would be wiped out by our machine guns. Then more extended order. Then more. Very few lived to even get near our barbed wire. Then came the real infantry advance. They came over the top in that massed formation. Oh Hell sure broke loose then. Machine guns. Infantry fire and artillery. How any man could ever live through that rain of steel and iron I don't know but they did managed to reach our trenches. They poured in and poured in like water from a pump to a pitcher and all the time machine guns and artillery kept up. Down there those men were fighting hand to hand. No bullets, just cold steel. The Germans sure hate that. Then our artillery and machine guns quit. No heavy firing except on the German side and then our guns broke out again and out of the American Trenches went the Dutch with the Americans after them.
Just at this time we heard a terrific explosion on the other side of the hill. Went over and found the gun had been been blown up. A direct hit for the Germans. We found only two men. One was dead. The other had his leg blown of[f] above the knee and his body was just peppered with little wounds. We put a tourniquet on him and rubed him up with iodine and put on some bandages and beat it to the Field Hospital at Campeu with him. We had no litter but we made one out of two poles and an overcoat.
That finished at night for us. We got back to my quarters at 5 o'clock. I have only told a small fraction of the things I saw. I can't remember it all. We wore our gas masks all the time we were up there. While we were walking from Coupru we had a peculiar experience of going down a road under shellfire. It gives you the funniest feeling. To be walking down the road and have a shell burst about 1/2 mile away. Then one a little closer then close. Boy, old, boy your hair stands on end then if it ever did before and you think of all your sins and you can't remember a nice thing you ever did in your life and all the mean things you have done come up in a lump and you can't forget them.
Man dear but you think of the loved ones [at] home too.
We have our hospital running and receiving American Wounded from the 4th Division - The 39th Infantry seems to be having the most casualties.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Friday, January 13, 2017 - 05:51 pm:

"Might that be Walt Disney?"

It looks like it. He never drove an ambulance during the war, but he famously had pictures taken with them after the war, because he thought they looked good on his resume'.


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