1915 touring -- backrest seat springs

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: 1915 touring -- backrest seat springs
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 04:13 pm:

What was the spring arrangement for the backrests? The touring that I'm reupholstering was completely void of springs, the previous trimmer opting to throw them out and replace everything with rubberized horsehair. Thanks a lot ding dong -- whoever you were!

Was it a single row of springs across the button row as in earlier tourings or more than that? Also, how were they attached to the backrest? In earlier cars with wood seats they are tacked to the wood, covered with duck cloth, and tied to that. Something is missing in the equation here and I'm not quite sure what.

Thanks in advance for your help.

(Message edited by WMH on January 14, 2017)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 04:50 pm:

Mine had springs in a frame; granted not very thick, and no springs at the bottom--they're up in the storage garage overhead or I'd photograph them. Held to the top edge wood with thin straps of material. I would put something between them and the metal to prevent rattles (rattles?? If ain't rattling, it ain't runnin'!).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 06:47 pm:

Thanks for the description, David. I didn't think of hanging them with straps. I can envision what you describe.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 09:18 pm:

Walter-
Here is the back seat of my 1919. Note the vertical pieces are channel steel and there are a punched out "hooks" near the center and near the bottom. Are your vertical pieces steel or wood?




Here the new backrest spring (from Snyder's)is setting in place. I think I may have used some plumbing strap and haywire to attach it.



The tack strip on mine is wood that I bent. (Never again.) I have heard good things about the synthetic tack strips.

Here is a wood frame for the back of a 1914 touring:



Good luck.

: ^ )

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 10:09 pm:

Walter,

I strongly believe the back rest springs varied with the body maker and if the body had wooden seat frames similar to the 1914 bodies or the metal seat frames introduced during the 1915 model year. Ref the posting at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/50893/70047.html that notes the Price List of Parts has different springs for the wood seat frame vs metal seat frame for the ROADSTERS. I have NOT checked the tourings but I suspect that will also be the case.

The posting at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/29/7861.html shows the wooden seat frames of an early 1915 Beaudett touring body. It shows that for that body and seat frame combination the springs were basically just the coils attached to a wooden cross board that was attached to the wood riser at the back of the front seat. (Leon -- thank you for posting the photo.)



Posting below shows May 1915 Beaudett wood seat frame front half (not mounted to a chassis) and also a different unknown (I am leaning towards Fisher – but cannot confirmed that) mounted on a the 1915 chassis – that’s Blackie. See: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/274107.html?1331812196


See also postings at:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/506218/559625.html?1438546288 1915

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/599638/687566.html?1477683234

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/183305.html?1295095136

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/329020.html?1356213511 metal eat frame 1920

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/190427.html?1298258244 “H” body – wood seat frame? or at least wooden stringers

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/29/15067.html wood vs metal seat frames – how to tell

We would greatly appreciate other 1915-1917 touring seat spring photos and information.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 10:54 pm:

Keith, the car I'm working on has steel vertical channels in the back seat as in your first photo. Is that wood horizontal you have just a fixture while you're reworking things? I understand what you have there with respect to the second photo and the tabs. The front seat on this car didn't have any channels. It's just the sheet metal skin. I in the morning I will upload photos of the car I'm working on. Thank you for your input.

Hap, thank you for your addition. More of this will be clear tomorrow after I post some photos.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 10:56 pm:

Keith's middle picture is pretty close to my spring units, except that there are no "hooks" to mount it, just strips of material nailed to the wood top piece.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Sunday, January 15, 2017 - 11:27 am:

Attached are the promised photos. As you can see, the rear seat area appears typical of the second photo posted by Keith. The front seat, however, is lacking in much of anything at all as far as a way to clip a spring unit to the steel. Is there some structural member similar in design to the rear that the front seat should have also?




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, January 15, 2017 - 11:38 am:

The armrests make it no earlier than a 1917 body.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Sunday, January 15, 2017 - 11:56 am:

You are correct. After digging into it I do believe the tub is a replacement 1917 body. Engine number and a lot of the other finer details pinpoint it to around a December 1914 car. I believe whoever first restored the car started with a decent whole car but swapped out the body tub in the process. I'm doing what I can with it to make it as 1915 as possible.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, January 16, 2017 - 12:29 am:

Walter,
Well, if that's your plan; 1)lose the wooden arm rests, '15 only had cotton there.
2) make certain the top front flat piece of the cowl doesn't have a half-moon cut out in the center (for clearing the later hood rod).
Front spring is tacked to the wood rim with straps of top material (scraps), some of the originals actually are formed to go over the top edge metal, providing some cushion of the top roll. A piece of cardboard was glued to the seat riser to keep the springs from rattling against it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Monday, January 16, 2017 - 08:36 am:

Thanks for the input, David. I deleted the metal caps from the armrests but put the wood armrests back on for the trip to the trimmer until we could determine what's what. I know the front armrest roll is supposed to be leather folded up but was unsure if there was still supposed to be a wood form of some description underneath. Thanks also for the input regarding the springs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David L Corman on Monday, January 16, 2017 - 10:56 am:

Single row of springs are tied together with small cord on my 15


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