What would you use?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: What would you use?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Okey on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 04:33 pm:

Looking for advice on what to use to fill holes in aluminum body moulding.I have a 1925 Tudor with aluminum moulding at the rear and side of the body.The body is steel.Aluminum body moulding


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 06:10 pm:

When I did my '22 Coupe molding like that I slightly counter sunk the nails and used regular automotive spot putty. It comes in a small tube and apply it let it dry and sand it and paint it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 06:13 pm:

Either some type of body filler (bondo) or JB-weld.

JB Weld is an epoxy along with other brands that are an epoxy.

I have a 24 Coupe that has a type of aluminum (pot metal?)moulding that had some nail holes I filled in with Bondo I purchased at Auto-Zone. It worked fine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Okey on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 06:21 pm:

Dennis and John,That's what I was thinking.I have had good luck with JB-Weld for other things.Some say body filler or JB-Weld may come loose.Just trying to get other opinions.Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 08:00 pm:

Bubble gum - just kidding. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 09:25 pm:

My Grandad would have told you to stuff it with huckumputty.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Okey on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 09:39 pm:

That's a new one to me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 09:59 pm:

Does anyone know what the original fasteners were like? Were they tacks with heads exposed, or were they filled and painted over? It would seem to me that they would be like the tacks which hold on the top, which sometimes get loose and need to be pounded in. If that be the case, then any filler would work loose and it would take the paint with it. If the molding were painted and then tacks were installed and either left as is such as brass, nichol, or other non corrosive material or painted over, they would not be such a problem. I wonder if anyone has an original 22 which has not had anything done to change that part?

Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 10:11 pm:

The original ones on my tudoor were about a #6 brad nail. The holes were drilled and then redrilled so the head of the finish nail was just able to go in and hold.They were filled with some filler almost like dry wall putty.I had to use a punch to drive them through the aluminum.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 11:17 pm:

Bob, I've not done that job on your exact application, but I have repaired nailed aluminum moldings on a couple of cars where the nails were causing the filler to pop out.

It's a tricky situation if you want a long term fix because you have a lot of stuff that can expand and contract with a fastener set in wood. In those cases I removed the nails one-by-one, countersunk the hole, reset it with a stainless flathead screw (that has had the head blasted to provide "tooth" for the filler), and then filled with Devcon A:

https://www.amazon.com/Devcon-10110-Plastic-Steel-Bottle/dp/B00065TMTO

I see in your photo everything is painted. Probably goes without saying, but of course everything will need to be bare metal for the above process to work.

These are repairs made on cars with repaints from the last 10 - 20 years using modern materials that failed. Most often what is found is either the head of the nail is starting to rust and is pushing off the filler or the nail is working its way out because it has lost its ability to hold in the wood. If then nail will no longer hold, the hole needs to be injected with a product like West System epoxy and redrilled to accept the screw.

Probably more than you wanted to know. Hope it helps with your plan going forward.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Okey on Sunday, January 15, 2017 - 07:57 am:

The mouldings on this car were held on with brads that were countersunk into the aluminum and filled over.Some rusted off.They did not pop out. Thanks for the help everyone.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, January 15, 2017 - 08:50 am:

Walter is giving you great advice. The mouldings need to be securely attached with screws or nailed again. Then you can use Devcon, Hysol, JB Weld or any similar product to fill over the steel head of the fastener. Finish up with spot putty.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Sunday, January 15, 2017 - 11:13 am:

What I would do, Bob, in a case like that is get a small carbide burr and cut the remaining heads off all the brads, remove the moldings completely to do the drill and countersink work, then reapply. Doing it this way you also have enough nail shank left sticking out that you can yank them from the body so you don't have to fight with them later.

If some heads have rusted off, others are not far behind and you don't want that coming back on you after you paint. Also, removing the moldings will allow you to clean everything. Clean the metal under the moldings, and the backside of the moldings, down to bare metal, etch prime everything, urethane prime everything, then reapply the moldings as described above and you know you have a surface from which you're not going to have flaky paint or rust creep out later. Of course, leave the topside of the moldings bare so the epoxy will take.

You usually wind up using #6 flathead screws for this. The other advantage of the stainless screw is if you buy it from a reputable source like Jamestown Distributors, they torque well without snapping off. Don't use cheap hardware store or Home Despot screws. The heads twist off with the least little bit of resistance and then you really have a mess on your hands.

Thanks, Royce, for the kind words.


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