Ford had a vicious increase in Model T parts in 1929

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Ford had a vicious increase in Model T parts in 1929
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 - 03:03 am:

Model T parts would be available for at least 10 yrs, tick that box.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 - 07:49 am:

Kevin,
Good article/letter. Personally, I suspect a little of both..... I suppose Ford Motor Company may have concluded raising prices on parts might "hasten" buying newer (Model A).

However, I suspect the bottom line is, the bottom line. Ford was no longer tooled up to make over a million Model T per year, and so no longer prepared to make the thousands upon thousands of parts they had before. No more economies of scale that allowed Model T, and therefore Model T parts, be produced at an ever decreasing price to the consumer, as had been the case with the T from the time it came out in 1908 through the mid twenties.

Just ideas, great article to read, thanks for posting,
Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willis Jenkins on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 - 08:24 am:

20 to 30% sounds a lot like greed if their not going to buy a Model A.

Willis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 - 10:34 am:

"They'll buy what I sell them".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 - 12:35 pm:

I think Rob hit the nail on the head. I could believe parts would cost 20-30% more to make (Or have made) when the quantity drops to a tiny fraction of what it once was.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 - 12:45 pm:

Supply and demand will create a cost increase. If Ford has it and you need it you'll pay the price he sets. If it was not increased by Ford then the dealer may have increased it on his own once he got it from Ford knowing that the item you need he has.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 - 12:53 pm:

Pick a part at random, like an exhaust manifold. In today's money, the 1928 price was $18.98. A new one in Lang's catalogue is $83.95. Economy of scale.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 - 01:06 pm:

When people talk to me about my truck, someone will often comment about
"old Fords" in general, implying the common paradigm that if you like one
Ford (or any other item), you must like them all. Sort of an all-or-nothing way
of seeing things. It is assumed the Ford guy must automatically dislike GM
products, etc.

I choose those with which I will attempt deeper conversation with carefully.
Few can think outside the box when it comes to brand loyalty and deeper
ethereal topics.

If I do go down this road with someone, they must show some twinkle of historical
interest beyond the tangible vehicle (or whatever) at hand. I will explain to
them that the Model T spanned a period where vehicles went from being very
crude and elementary mechanical replacements for horse-drawn conveyances,
to being something altogether different. I might go into mechanical advances,
and certainly touch on body work and styling. What I try to get them to wrap
their head around is a concept of "modern" as it looked through a 1930 lens,
or how it fits in the big picture of all automotive history.

I like Model T era cars, particularly Black Era cars. It is not so much about
the cars themselves as it is the peculiar slice of history they represent.

What does this have to do with the original post ? Well, pretty much everything.
What Henry made and sold, from concept to product was wrested from him
as the times that made the Model T possible waned and the company moved
on to make and market to a whole different paradigm. It is that hard-to-define
"way" that things were that made Henry Ford's idea and car work on such a
grand scale, THAT is what I like about Model T's. All the rest are just cars.

What the OP posted is one of those ethereal *clue* items about how the world
was changing at the time, and how Model T's were quickly becoming a novelty
item to a new and trendy world. The concept of squeezing people out through
marketing and pricing had arrived.

Some people get it. Others, it is like explaining my computer invoicing program
to my cat. They just look on pleasantly and I can see it is lost on them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 - 01:23 pm:

Huh?


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