Old Photo ID Wanted

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Old Photo ID Wanted
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, January 20, 2017 - 02:44 am:

Photo credit is to Joe Clark.

Where ? When Backstory ? My interweb searching has turned up
zilch.

I bought this album in 1972 out of the cut out bin at Art's Food Center.
The cover caught my eye. This aspiring 12-year-old guitar picker found
a lot of inspiration in old Chet. The music was the soundtrack to my
earliest Model T fantasies.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ryan Fenrich on Friday, January 20, 2017 - 02:59 am:

Are you just after information on the album itself?

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yestergroovin

If link doesn't work (I'm sending this from mobile), either delete "m." before the "w", or just type in Yestergroovin to Wikipedia.

I'm a big Chet fan myself.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, January 20, 2017 - 09:35 am:

With a Google image search, only the album comes up. Apparently the original photo and its story are not online. The clothing styles say late thirties or early forties, but beyond that I have no clue.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Friday, January 20, 2017 - 10:05 am:

Joe Clark H.B.S.S.("Hill Billy Snap Shooter") specialized in down-home, folksy pictures of small town Americana, mostly in the Appalachia region, but he also did quite a few in Detroit.
He was featured in Life and National Geographic and had a syndicated photograph portfolio that ran weekly in (mostly) small town papers

Maybe a search of his work will turn up the title of this picture.
Most of his work was done in the 1940's- 1980's and I always thought his photographs were similar to Norman Rockwell's paintings.

He died in 1989.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Friday, January 20, 2017 - 10:53 am:

The un-dated photograph is of Dal Gulley's general store, most likely in Cumberland Tennessee.
Dal is behind the counter and to his left is the photographer, Joe Clark, handing a chicken to his sister, Maude
It was cropped down a bit for Chet's LP


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Friday, January 20, 2017 - 11:03 am:

https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc499806/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Friday, January 20, 2017 - 11:33 am:

while digging around for information on this photograph, I found an online issue of Life magazine from June 10, 1940 that featured a "Mountain Funeral" (pgs. 104-109) photo essay by Joe Clark.https://books.google.com/books?id=4j8EAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA21&lpg=PA21&dq=life+dal+gull ey&source=bl&ots=LLkCXlceSI&sig=SPkV18IFpCpoSM9q7El86P8JsN8&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUK EwiJkMe4j9HRAhWCrlQKHRe8DKoQ6AEIIzAB#v=onepage&q=life%20dal%20gulley&f=false
It deals with the funeral of Joe's aunt, Elizabeth Clark O'Dell who lived in Howard's Quarter near Tazewell, Tennessee.
In one photograph it shows the pallbearers with her casket patiently waiting as mourners lay stones in the creek on the way to the graveyard because the foot bridge across the stream was too narrow to cross carrying her casket over.
As she had, according to the story, never lived more than a mile from the house into which she was born, the thought struck me that as a young girl growing up in that hollow she had probably crossed that shallow creek many a time skipping over rocks just like those that now guided her to her final resting place.

Oh, the strange connections you can make wandering the interwebs!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, January 20, 2017 - 12:20 pm:

Dale,

Cut yerself an extra slice of raisin pie for being such an awesome webbonator ! :-)

Yes, my interest was in the photo backstory. If memory serves, there was
something written in the liner notes, but my vinyl collection is long gone and I
have no reference, other than to buy a replacement. As I figured, Chet or his
cover art team found that photo in a collection and there was more to the story
that even they included.

For whatever reasons, this album went into cut-out bin sales by 1972 (issued
in 1970) and has never been rereleased. I made the acquaintance of a friend
of Chet's back in about 1990 and lamented this. He gave me Chet's contact
intel, saying Chet was a real down-to-earth guy and would be happy to hear
from me on this issue. Like a fool, I got busy and never followed through. As
far as I know, the music contained therein remains unavailable in any format
but the original vinyl. I sure would like to roll around in my truck listening to
this, just as I had it playing in my head as I climbed on and over all the old barn
scene T-era cars and trucks that littered the farms around where I grew up.

Back to the photo, is there any question that at least one TT isn't parked just
outside this store ? A truck load of wood and wire crates full of hens going
down the road as the occasional feather came loose and curled away in the
breeze.

A great photo of everything I love about the old America. :-)

Thanks for the research.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Friday, January 20, 2017 - 01:18 pm:

Thank You, Burger!

Ol' Joe is a favourite of mine from way back.

Here is a short video about him with some of his great photographs. Your picture shows up early in the film.

http://nmisscommentor.com/south/joe-clark-great-photographer-of-appalachia/


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