How to remove crankshaft pulley pin

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: How to remove crankshaft pulley pin
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lenney Glenn on Tuesday, January 24, 2017 - 07:50 pm:

The crankshaft pin refuses to budge on my 1913 T. I need to replace a badly worn pulley I have never had a problem until I tackled this 13. What do you guys recommend? The hand crank ratchet pin was also very stuborn. Lenney


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Tuesday, January 24, 2017 - 09:04 pm:

You never know what you might run into. Someone had spot welded the pin to the pulley in mine. If the pin is not original, and softer steel was used, it might be bent, making it near impossible to drive out. How rusty is it ? Heat can work wonders properly applied.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Tuesday, January 24, 2017 - 09:14 pm:

You have to be careful with heat though as the first main babbitt would be at risk.

Mine was ridiculously stubborn to remove also. I ended up removing the radiator and fan to gain room and through a variety of tools (Dremel with various attachments), I was able to get it cut down to the inner hub of the pulley. I then carefully drilled it out just slightly undersize of the pin size. Then I was able to drive it out. Mind you I had spent several hours on it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Tuesday, January 24, 2017 - 10:56 pm:

From the MTFCA Engine manual, "You will note that the pulley has two holes in its surface, one hole being larger than the other. Remove the cotter and using a drift punch, drive the pin out through the large hole. Note that the cotter key end of this pin faces the large hole." Correct me if I'm wrong but I believe all of this is due to the pulley pin being slightly tapered, so it must come out large end, first and go back in small end first. If you are trying to drive it the correct way and it still won't budge, either penetrating oil or heat might be needed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lenney Glenn on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 05:21 am:

Thank you guys for your suggestions. I am driving from the opposite end of the cotter pin. The holes are so badly worn I can't tell which is larger, but I was thinking the cotter pin is in the larger diameter of the tapered pin. I have been liberal with PB Blaster.I can't get back to it for a few days but then I will try moderate heat.If this fails it's on to Chad's idea. Lenney


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 08:10 am:

Heat it just a bit so you don't violate the front babbit, then apply bees wax to it. Then try your punch.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 10:35 am:

I don't think the the pin was ever tapered when it came from the factory. While someone may have installed one at a later date, it should be just a straight pin. It has to come out the large hole because if both holes were the same size you would need cotter pins at both ends so the small hole was intended to just be big enough to get a punch through.
Be sure the pins and holes in the pulley are lined up to match the hole in the pan before you start pounding.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 11:44 am:

I agree. In my very limited experience I never encountered a tapered pin. -1915 parts list shows part #3040 C.S. Starting pin 3/8" x 2-3/4". If it was tapered it probably would have said so.

I made mine long enough to put a "step" in the pin to fit the small hole. Helped to stabilize the pulley which was a wee bit loose on the crankshaft.


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