Nazi parts on steering components

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Nazi parts on steering components
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Pablo Santos on Tuesday, January 24, 2017 - 10:58 pm:

I was rebuilding the front end on my 26 Tudor and when I sandblasted the spring loaded drag link housing I noticed a swastika on it. I didn't know the nazis made parts for them lol.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Tuesday, January 24, 2017 - 11:04 pm:

First,that is not an original Ford part.It is aftermarket. There was a tool company in AK. I believe, and their symbol was the Maltese cross.Way back before WW2,that was a christian symbol and a sign of good luck. Some where I have a BSA coin with it on it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Mullin on Tuesday, January 24, 2017 - 11:05 pm:

Maybe its from a Krit.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RalphS in NE Oregon on Tuesday, January 24, 2017 - 11:10 pm:

It's not a Nazi swastika, the hooks are going the opposite direction.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Tuesday, January 24, 2017 - 11:10 pm:

Very interesting find Pablo!
IF I have my head on square, the Japanese swastika is layed out like your steering part. The German swastika is S shaped as compared to the Japanese version which is Z shaped.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Tuesday, January 24, 2017 - 11:20 pm:

Buffum Tools used to use that trademark.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Tuesday, January 24, 2017 - 11:29 pm:

A swastika is NOT a Maltese cross.
Before WW2 the swastika was used by many people in many countries, including the U.S.
The NATZIs made it unpopular so nobody ever uses it anymore.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 12:05 am:

Use of swastika in American manufacturing industry

http://www.mallstuffs.com/Blogs/BlogDetails.aspx?BlogId=219&BlogType=Spiritual&T opic=Use%20of%20swastika%20in%20American%20manufacturing%20industry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 12:18 am:

KRIT Automobiles





KRIT and the Nazi Swastika, NOT the same thing:

http://rexcurry.net/krit_motor_car_company_detroit.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 12:55 am:

Even the US Army used this symbol: 45th Infantry Division

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/45th_Infantry_Division_(United_States)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Pat Kelly Montana on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 01:00 am:

Here's the real deal. A WW-2 German belt buckle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dane Hawley Near Melbourne Australia on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 03:18 am:

The Boy Scouts also used that symbol before the rise of the Nazi party.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 06:48 am:

That Symbol always reminded me of the simple steam engine an uncle showed me once. I don't remember what he called it but, It was a simple ball with the pipes coming out from the equator, water was added to the ball it hung from a chain heat was applied (usually a candle) and when it got hot enough the ball would spin and whistle. I was probably 5 or 6 and could watch that thing for hours.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Martin Vowell, Sylmar, CA on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 06:53 am:

It is also a Hindi, Buddist and Jainism sun symbol and dates back 11,000 years. It is known in the West as the gammadion cross mainly from the way it looks...it resembles 4 Greek gamma letters tied together. The name Swastika is a sanskrirt word and is usually taken to mean a lucky or auspicious object, hence it's association with good luck. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 07:30 am:

It's a shame how one group of people can take something with a good meaning and tarnish it to the point it is considered evil hence now and forever more. The swastika is not the only example.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 07:40 am:



Base of street lamps in Glendale Ca.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 07:44 am:



Base of street lamps in Glendale Ca.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 07:46 am:

The old Latina Dam and spillway in Yuma Az is adorned with similar images.

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-BY5RCeXYi3s/USr57aYU2vI/AAAAAAAAFQc/E_wzfOjqBqk/s1600/ 005+DSC_5969.JPG


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 07:48 am:

Laguna Dam


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 07:57 am:

my acc mod t truck cab has that mark on the floor board risers, and i have an oil can holder to. charley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Strickling on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 08:38 am:

The trim work by the ceiling in foyer in the High School where I teach has them in the tile work. I also have rental property and the old linoleum on the basement steps has them on it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Ireland, Montrose, Iowa on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 08:50 am:

This symbol can be fund as far back as in sand script. Early meanings of "Good Fortune" are believed. Even the early trade mark for Coca Cola used it. Dave.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 09:01 am:

Coronado naval amphibious base. Common shape, it's everywhere.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert L. Rogers on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 01:04 pm:

There are a few old government buildings in Phoenix with swastikas under the eaves. I was told it was a Navajo good luck symbol and have seen a few old Navajo rugs from the 20s/30s with that design woven into them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 08:02 pm:

Just blocks away from me, they tore down an old grocery store to build condos. It was on the site of a former auto garage from 1921. After demolition, neighbors were shocked to see this old ceramic floor visible.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 09:30 pm:

Did you get that part from Oak Island?
Perhaps the Knights Templar manufactured it in the 16th century?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steven Meixner on Thursday, January 26, 2017 - 08:37 am:

There is a KRIT for sale on HCCA


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Allen on Thursday, January 26, 2017 - 11:50 pm:

At the Lyondell refinery on the Ship Channel in Houston, there's a valve, that has the swastika on it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Martin Vowell, Sylmar, CA on Friday, January 27, 2017 - 06:41 am:

The Swastika also shows up in a lot of Navajo, Hopi, Apache and Oglala Lakota jewelry...they call it the whirling log.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Skip Anderson, Bloomington, MN. on Friday, January 27, 2017 - 11:05 am:

Don, you are correct. Crane Co. valves in the early 1900's used the swastika symbol on their early steel valves. I ran into them on occasion at various paper mill plants and older power plants.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Friday, January 27, 2017 - 11:41 am:

Here's a set of wooden shaft golf clubs I have in my collection. Don't know if Nazi or some makers mark that had nothing to do with Germany, but the wooden shafts certainly seem close enough to the time frame to be sensitive to the meaning of the mark.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Friday, January 27, 2017 - 11:49 am:

Well, now that you got me started. Just a rant about how PC the world has gotten. It's as if WWII never existed. I used to build model military kits for museums and colectors and the kits were represented as being of the era. Notice the two model kits photos attached, one is a vintage kit with the swastika on the tail of the plane as they were during the war, and the modern version of the same plane, with no swastika. If you built the vintage plane, your decal sheet would contain a swastika or two. If you built the current version, you would not get a swastika decal or you would get small straight line decals and a cross or x and you would create your own swastika, but, heaven forbid, the model company create one for you.

Just an interesting observation.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Johnson on Friday, January 27, 2017 - 12:16 pm:

Please see bearing scrapers made by Buffum Tool Co. from Louisiana, Missouri. The company closed in 1924. Some 'T' mechanics may have these in their tool collection.
Bearing Scrapers


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Friday, January 27, 2017 - 12:29 pm:

Robert B.,

You're right about how PC everything is now. Personally I don't get it. The best way to assure history will repeat itself is to not remember and learn from it. Your example of the model planes is a perfect example. Eliminating the swastika is a step toward erasing the history, which is a step toward repeating it. It makes no sense to me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, January 27, 2017 - 12:49 pm:

I have always found the swastika to be an attractive symbol. Understanding
it is an ancient symbol, I find it unfortunate that post-war minds assign a singular
association to it. The Nazi's DID exhibit a strong sense of "show" with all their
gear and pageantry, and their use of the swastika was always dramatic. Still, I
find it a shame that if one were to wear it, adorn their home, business card, or
anything else with it, they'd immediately be branded a loon or hatemonger.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert L. Rogers on Friday, January 27, 2017 - 12:59 pm:

The model plane above is by the Revell model company. It was bought out by a German firm several years ago and as the swastika is illegal in Germany, their models no longer have that decal. Other manufacturers, however, do have the swastika in their decal sets.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Friday, January 27, 2017 - 01:02 pm:

I'm betting most would skip loon and go directly to hate monger.

I am proud of my Southern heritage, but hare groups have taken over that flag. If you have one today, then you must hate black people. That's simply not true, but it is to most people.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Friday, January 27, 2017 - 01:05 pm:

The "Hitler" block mustache was a common mustache of the time, and even in old newsreels you can see many of those around Hitler sporting them proudly. Try growing one today and prepare for the inevitable attack.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Friday, January 27, 2017 - 01:07 pm:

That was supposed to be "Hate" groups, not "Hare" groups. But who knows? Maybe there is a group of militant rabbits out there. Everybody else is protesting. Why not?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, January 27, 2017 - 01:12 pm:

After the fall of the wall, a client imported a 1930-ish Mercedes dual cowl staff car
abandoned by the retreating Germans in Ukraine, still in its field grey paint with giant
dot and swastika across the hood. The car was awesome to behold, but as he said to
me, "What can I do with it ? It's not like I could ever take this thing out on the streets !"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Friday, January 27, 2017 - 01:29 pm:

Burger, I thought about that when I saw that a Krit car is for sale in the HCCA classifieds. You couldn't leave it parked because some nut might come spray it with graffiti. My grandma grew up in Germany and got here in 54 or 55. Growing up I saw swastikas in pictures of my great-grandpa, and it is an attractive symbol. I draw them all over but my mom told me I better not do that when I went to school. The PC people are nuts. I read a thing on Facebook that said a lot of young people are getting their hair cut like Hitler's and their parents shouldn't allow it or they shouldn't come to school like that. It's a haircut. Like the mustache. I saw somebody on TV yesterday making jokes about Germans liking sausage. Maybe I should have been offended, or maybe some people just like to cry about everything.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Friday, January 27, 2017 - 01:37 pm:

Actually, I think it's perfectly ok to hate Jews again. It's Muslims that must be treated with kid gloves.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, January 27, 2017 - 01:38 pm:

It IS the age of the Hurt Feeling.

Do you have YOUR copy of the Hurt Feelings Report to hand out ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, January 27, 2017 - 01:41 pm:

It IS the age of the Hurt Feeling.

Do you have YOUR copy of the Hurt Feelings Report to hand out ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, January 27, 2017 - 01:42 pm:

Hmmm .... why is the HFR not showing ? It shows on my preview.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Friday, January 27, 2017 - 02:15 pm:

Actually, I am seeing a lot of hurt feelings here!

Sadly, it is "hurt feelings" because you feel you cant wear or fly the symbols of a couple of losing armies that opposed the United States of America and have now been adopted by white nationalists, Christian identity racists and the KKK.

Get a grip. Yes, they had different historical origins than with the scum they are now associated with, but, seeing as that they "own" those symbols in the mind of 99.9% of the public, why would you want to be associated with them?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, January 27, 2017 - 02:46 pm:

There is the rub .... "adopted by".

Kinda like some non-black guy showing up at a Black Lives Matter event and
suggesting all lives matter. I wonder how that would work out ?

It is just a perversion of what is right for a special interest cause. I just can't
get with that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Friday, January 27, 2017 - 03:27 pm:

Adopted, co-opted, recycled. It now has a different meaning from its original purpose. I doubt the maker of the drag-link cap was an early closet brown shirt sympathizer, but that symbol elicits strong reactions now because of its post 1933 history. It can't be denied, and surely folks with an even the slightest interest in history beyond Model T Fords cant claim ignorance or bewilderment over the emotional reaction a swastika provokes today.

I had a friend who had a 1944 Kubelwagen, painted (incorrectly) as a tan coloured Afrika Corps vehicle with the palm tree swastikas on the doors. He once took it to a senior center for an benefit old car show in the 1980's and had some of the residents stop and cross themselves before walking by it and one old veteran break down in tears at the sight of that car and then be carried back inside. I guess he could have protested to the old man that it was just an ancient good luck symbol and he had no right to have "hurt feelings" but shortly afterwards, he had it repainted the correct dull grey and left the swastikas in the trash.

I am always amazed at how far adrift these threads can wander, from an interesting picture of a steering component marking to the Third Reich, KKK, Stars & Bars and the Black Lives Matter movement, but I guess it is why this board is so active!

Ironically, today is National Holocaust Memorial Day, the day 72 years ago that the Allies liberated the swastika festooned death camp Auschwitz-Birkenau.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Friday, January 27, 2017 - 03:51 pm:

Yes, perfectly good and innocent things tainted by a "bit" of bad (or evil) history.

Try suggesting to your children that they name your next male grandson Adolph.

You are unlikely to hear, as an expression of praise, the exclamation; "That's Hitlerific!".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Martin Vowell, Sylmar, CA on Friday, January 27, 2017 - 05:36 pm:

Rather than cry about it...why not just take those symbols back? The neo witch movement did with the pentagram and it's seen today as less evil than it was once perceived, even though it is was once the symbol of Israel known as the Star of Abraham. It was David who put the 6th point on Abraham's star making it into the Shield of David or Magen David.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Friday, January 27, 2017 - 11:59 pm:

I had a similar part I posted about years ago.I can't find it now if I tried.But it was kind of a shock finding the symbol on there.

It don't bother me to see it if it is history related.Such as on a car of the era or in a collection of memorabilia. I have a friend that collects german stuff but he is nervous for people to know it because he is afraid others would think he liked German history for the wrong reasons. Some of his family was from over there.My ancestors are from Germany but they came long before that war happened.

what I aint understood is why folks remember Hitler so well and would be so against him after all these years but then walk over to their Mitsubishi and drive away. If I aint mistaken the first Mitsubishi's imported into the US were flown into Pearl Harbor. Looks like that would be just as repulsive.

(Message edited by tdump on January 28, 2017)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Saturday, January 28, 2017 - 12:01 am:

I finally learned how to edit a message.

(Message edited by tdump on January 28, 2017)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, January 28, 2017 - 12:50 am:

I studied German history with Rod Stackleberg, at his home on Sundays.
You can Google him for his story. Being of Bavarian decent, the subject has
always been of special interest to me. For all the demonization of Nazis
during and after the war, American culture has done a fine job of trying to
wipe away our own complicity in Eugenics and where the Nazis took it.
Taking it further, almost no one in this country understands the complex
social and political forces that occurred in central Europe between 1848
and 1933. They just run with the simplistic dismissal that a madman cast
his evil spell on an unsuspecting nation, and with the wave of a magic war
wand, Germany suddenly regained its "sanity". Yeah .....

As Mack pointed out, we are every bit as hypocritical in our demonization
of Nazis, and total silence and ignorance over Japanese activities going all
the way back to when Henry first dreamed up the Model T.

I traveled once to Birkenau with a Polish camp survivor. I sat with her beside
the railroad tracks that led to the brick archway as she had a total meltdown.
While I have seen firsthand the stories and emotions of those who actually
saw it happen, I will respect the dignity of those who died or suffered on all
sides, but I refuse to condemn an ancient symbol for its temporary use by a
shortlived regime.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Saturday, January 28, 2017 - 03:15 am:

Takes all of history to make something great but 1 minutes to ruin huh?
Political correctness needs to be stomped out. Know why? An american i know had themselves castrated because she was part german and twitter told her to, among other politically correct garbage.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Saturday, January 28, 2017 - 12:15 pm:

Umm, Kep ol' friend, I don't know how to tell you this, but, if she was FEMALE, she couldn't be CASTRATED.
I suspect if "she" was indeed castrated, she was not only "part German", she was also part something else!

I Think Sam Cooke said it best:

"Don't know much about history,
don't know much about biology....."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, January 28, 2017 - 12:35 pm:

It was the express purpose of the ERO - Eugenics Research Office - to wipe out
"social undesirables" through the very means the Nazis ultimately took it to.
Failing to gain legal right to euthanize those they deemed "undesirable", they
settled for the next best thing, forced sterilization.

Incidentally, the ERO was funded MILLIONS of pre-war dollars to lobby and
develop the "science" of Eugenics, something the Germans referred to as "racial
hygiene". Funding/support came directly from very familiar names today, like the
U.S. Govt, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Carnegie Foundation, and the Harriman
Trust. IBM provided the data system used by the Nazis to track geneology and
efficiently perform the Holocaust. Hmmm .....

=========================================

“Three Generations of Imbeciles Are Enough”

So wrote Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. in Buck v. Bell, a 1927 Supreme court
case upholding a Virginia law that authorized the state to surgically sterilize certain
“mental defectives” without their consent.

Carrie Buck was a patient in the Virginia State Colony for Epileptics and Feeble-minded.
Upon a finding that she was “the probable potential parent of socially inadequate
offspring, likewise afflicted, that she may be sexually sterilized without detriment to
her general health, and that her welfare and that of society will be promoted by her
sterilization,” the Court upheld her involuntary tubal ligation. The Court infamously
justified its decision as follows:

"We have seen more than once that the public welfare may call upon the best citizens for their lives. It would be strange if it could not call upon those who already sap the strength of the State for these lesser sacrifices, often not felt to be such by those concerned, in order to prevent our being swamped with incompetence. It is better for all the world if, instead of waiting to execute degenerate offspring for crime or to let them starve for their imbecility, society can prevent those who are manifestly unfit from continuing their kind. . . . Three generations of imbeciles are enough."

State laws permitting sterilization of individuals deemed unfit to reproduce — most
commonly institutionalized persons with mental illness, or even conditions such as
epilepsy — were common in the first half of the twentieth century. Buck herself did
not learn of her sterilization until decades later — she was told at the time that the
operation was an appendectomy. More than 650,000 people were sterilized under
such laws, which were enacted in more than 30 states.

Today, thanks to the Human Genome Project and its progeny, scientists understand
the genetic transmission of mental illness to a degree nearly inconceivable at the time
of Buck v. Bell. While the science underlying such efforts may seem as dated today
as the pre-Copernican notion that the sun revolves around the earth, the Virginia law
upheld in Buck v. Bell was not repealed until 1974.


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