Old Photo non-T record-breaking speedster in 1913

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Old Photo non-T record-breaking speedster in 1913
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Bamford, Edmonton AB on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 - 12:28 pm:

Not sure if I posted this one a few years ago. Lots of neat details.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 - 12:49 pm:

nice car, but I would love to be able to walk through that gold-mining dredge in the background!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 - 12:55 pm:

Is that a Flanders?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 - 01:22 pm:

Dale,When we were in Dawson City there was a road you could take that ran along Bonanza Creek [i think] back in about 20 miles there was a huge dredge that was enclosed in a fence.At certain times you could take a tour of the dredge but we got there late.At one tourist trap we did find a 1913 Marquette that was built in Saginaw,Mi. Great place Dawson City!!!!!!!!!!!!! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 - 01:24 pm:

Dale,When we were in Dawson City there was a road you could take that ran along Bonanza Creek [i think] back in about 20 miles there was a huge dredge that was enclosed in a fence.At certain times you could take a tour of the dredge but we got there late.At one tourist trap we did find a 1913 Marquette that was built in Saginaw,Mi. Great place Dawson City!!!!!!!!!!!!! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Landry, Hudson, NH on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 - 01:51 pm:

There's a dredge like that you can walk through outside of Fairbanks, AK. golddredge8.com


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 - 02:35 pm:

There's also one out of Baker City, OR. At the same location is also the Sumpter Valley Narrow Gauge Railroad--TWO reasons to go there!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Mc Willie on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 - 02:53 pm:

I am almost positive it is a Flanders "20".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 - 02:56 pm:

flanders is right. charley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Murray on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 - 04:59 pm:

Dredge #4 on Bonanza Creek has been stabilized/preserved by Parks Canada and is open during the summer for tours:

http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/lhn-nhs/yt/klondike/natcul/dn4.aspx

The dredge was electric powered and needed 450 hp when operating, supplied from a hydro plant upstream. Vandals have stripped most of the copper out of the dredge, but the motor frames and most of the mechanicals are still intact, and awesome in scale!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 - 05:03 pm:

Bare bones comes to mind :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Bamford, Edmonton AB on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 - 05:44 pm:

Here is a zoom-in of the radiator... is that a Flanders badge? Cool tire covers.



Here is a zoom-in on the dredge in the background. From the Parks Canada write-up below, it appears this is the same unit as in Jack Murray's photo!



"Not long after gold was discovered in large quantities in the Klondike, dredges were brought into the Yukon, the first dredge being built in the fall of 1899. One of the two dozen dredges that worked this area, Dredge No. 4 rests on Claim No. 17 Below Discovery on Bonanza Creek near the spot where it ceased operations in 1960. The largest wooden hull, bucket-line dredge in North America, it was designed by the Marion Steam Shovel Company.

Operational History

Dredge No. 4 was built during the summer and winter of 1912 for the Canadian Klondike Mining Company on Claim 112 Below Discovery on Bonanza Creek. It commenced operations in May of 1913, and dug its way upstream in the Klondike Valley into what was known as the "Boyle Concession," sinking there in 1924. In 1927, it was refloated and continued to operate from the Klondike Valley to Hunker Creek. The ground at the mouth of Hunker Creek was so rich the dredge produced as much as 800 ounces of gold in a single day on Claim 67 Below. It operated until 1940. The dredge was rebuilt on Bonanza Creek by the Yukon Consolidated Gold Corporation and from 1941 to 1959 worked the Bonanza Creek valley.

Dredge No. 4 is 2/3 the size of a football field and 8 stories high. It has a displacement weight of over 3,000 tons (2,722 t), with a 16 cubic foot (.45 cubic metre) bucket capacity. The dredge could dig 48 feet (17 metres) below water level, and 17 feet (5 metres) above water level using hydraulic monitors and washing the gravel banks down.

The dredge was electrically powered from the Company's hydro plant on the Klondike River about 30 miles (48 kilometres) away, requiring 920 continuous horsepower during the digging operation. Extra horsepower was needed occasionally for such things as hoisting the "spud" (pivot) and the gangplank.

The dredge moved along on a pond of its own making, digging gold bearing gravel in front, recovering the gold through the revolving screen washing plant, then depositing the gravel out the stacker at the rear. A dredge pond could be 300 feet (91 metres) by as much as 500 feet (152 metres) wide, depending on the width of the valley in which the dredge was working. The operating season was on average about 200 days, starting in late April or early May and operating 24 hours a day until late November.

The dredges were a very efficient means of mining for gold. The very fine flour gold however was very hard to save, as were nuggets too large to go through the 1 1/8 inch (1.9 centimetre) holes in the revolving screen, or those caught in the nugget catcher. These went up the stacker and out to the tailing piles."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 - 06:04 pm:

In that part of the country it is almost unbelievable the vast amount tailings!! Drive up to the top of the Dome for a look at Dawson City then go to Diamond Tooth Gertys for a better look! Watch the ferry on the Yukon then take a crossing!! Is it still free? Bud.Thank you Jack!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Murray on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 - 08:24 pm:

Last time I was back (2014) the ferry to West Dawson and the Top of The World Highway was still free! Friends tell me the west Dawson residents still haven't gotten their ice crossing yet; seems that the Yukon River has had a 3.5 mile lead of open water there this winter:


(copied from a Jan 20 report by CBC)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Pat Kelly Montana on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 - 10:38 pm:

This dredge is near Richard on the Yankee Fork River. It is open for tours and is pretty much complete. It's still floating in it's pond. Our club toured it last fall.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison - Rice, Minnesota on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 - 11:05 pm:

It's certainly different than the hardrock iron ore mining we were doing on Northern Minnesota's Mesabi Iron Range. Our washing plants sat stationary and we got to play with 50 lb Monsanto charges.

The dredge didn't seem to have too worry to much about disposing of overburden. And the machine dumped its tailings back where it came from. I can see where efficiency would be very high. Fuel costs would be manageable.

How big would the crew have been on one of those dredges?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 - 11:44 pm:

Pat, we have been to that dredge a few times but I can't find my pictures. We did visit this one with the Boise T club on a McCall, ID tour once. I can't find details but we posed for a possible VF cover shot. It was 1978 as I recall. It is more difficult to "dredge" up photos and memories these days.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Arthur Gebeau on Wednesday, February 01, 2017 - 12:02 am:

Mike G., your bringing up the Mesabi Range made me think back to when I was there in the mid-50's. I was underground in the Soudan Mine-some of the hardest drilling rock around.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison - Rice, Minnesota on Wednesday, February 01, 2017 - 12:21 am:

Yup, the Soudan was up on the Vermillion Range. At the start we had underground mines on the Mesabi. But the ore was close enough to the surface, stripping and open pit made sense.

I remember my brother watching the screens in the washing plant for bones and other remains of miners while they were opening up one of the old underground mines near Marble Minnesota. I think it might have been either the King or Diamond mines. Though he saw some pieces of metal from some lamps, after 50 years he didn't see any body parts.

I worked in the farthest West mine on the Mesabi Range. We had two pits. The Lind and the Greenway. Now they're some very beautiful crystal clear lakes. I also spent some time at the Hill Annex mine near Calumet. Now it's a State Park giving tours and the pit is full of water.

I hope, someday before I cash in, I'll be able to live back up on the Mesabi. The Winters are a bit more bitter there but the summers are wonderful.


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration