A Bit OT - Norman Rockwell

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: A Bit OT - Norman Rockwell
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Friday, February 03, 2017 - 08:58 am:

From today's "A Writer's Almanac" by Garrison Keillor:



Today is the birthday of painter Norman Rockwell (1894), whose illustrations of everyday American life graced the cover of The Saturday Evening Post for over 50 years. Rockwell painted soldiers, mooney-eyed teenaged lovers, and doughy policemen. Rockwell's paintings appeared on the cover of the Post more than 300 times.

Norman Percevel Rockwell was born in New York City and grew up in cramped, shabby apartments. He was sickly, skinny, underweight, bad at math, probably dyslexic, and wore corrective shoes. But he was also a talented drawer from a young age and when he was 14, he began attending the Chase Art School, which is now the Parsons School of Design. He did early work for Boys' Life magazine and the Boy Scouts of America. About art, he said, "The story is the first thing and the last thing."

Norman Rockwell was so popular that he endorsed after-shave, wine, and tombstones. He even judged the Miss America pageant twice and played a gambler in the movie Stagecoach (1966). He painted the portraits of several presidents of the United States, including John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, and Richard Nixon, and celebrities like Judy Garland and Colonel Sanders. Most of his adult life, he lived at 24 Lord Kitchener Road in New Rochelle, New York. He painted over 4,000 original works in his lifetime.


Some of Mr. Rockwell's (old car related) work that I swiped from the 'net:



















While this image is not quite car related, I relish all of the garage detail.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Friday, February 03, 2017 - 09:08 am:

Dang,
I doubled one instead of including this one:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Friday, February 03, 2017 - 09:46 am:

Normal Rockwell was a Modern Master.

Many years ago I was very fortunate to attend a lecture at the Phoenix Art Museum given by his son Peter which was in collaboration with an exhibit of Norman Rockwell art on display.

Peter was the model for the Boy on the Train being served by the Pullman - he remembered a long day on that train follow d by a trip to Macy's to pick out any toy he wanted ....

Norman was very hard on himself - he questioned his talent as an artist - gave away many of the originals used for Saturday Evening Post Cover Illustrations.

He would send (3) different originals each time - he was worried just one was not good enough.

Peter did not have even one original - he joked he could not afford even the insurance on one !

Norman was a master of light in the tradition of the fine renaissance artists.

I very much enjoy both how talented & humble he really was.


Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Friday, February 03, 2017 - 09:56 am:

Raised with Model As, as was my only child - a son - who is a college freshman this year, so this one is especially meaningful to me:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Friday, February 03, 2017 - 12:10 pm:

I am not one of the artsy fartsy type and don't know an impressionist from ......well, any of the other types of artist. BUT, I do LOVE Norman Rockwell!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Friday, February 03, 2017 - 12:16 pm:

He certainly had a way of putting wonderful things on canvas. Those days when he was so prolific were special times. It is nice to see those again that are posted above.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Eddie on Friday, February 03, 2017 - 12:30 pm:

Great post Bill, the family outing in the sedan with grandma and dog is a 31 Plymouth. Which was grandfather car from 1937 - 1948. I have one in my collection.

Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Tillstrom 30 miles N of Memphis TN on Friday, February 03, 2017 - 01:23 pm:

About ten years ago my wife and I along with another couple we coming back from the Clear Lake tour and came through Hannibal MO. There is a nice Norman Rockwell exhibit in the riverfront museum that include a bunch of the sketches he made that he used to make his paintings with. We had no idea that such a collection existed in a sleepy little town. It was a nice surprise.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Friday, February 03, 2017 - 01:53 pm:

Ron, that painting was featured in a show last night called "Strange Inheritance". A father died leaving his sons a Norman Rockwell painting (The one you show, "Leaving Home"), which they loaned to museum. The museum noticed a few discrepancies and deduced that it was a very good copy, but they displayed it anyway because it was almost a perfect copy. Later on, while going through the house, the sons discovered a false wall behind which, was the original Norman Rockwell "Leaving Home" painting. Turns out, their father who was himself a talented artist had studied under Norman Rockwell, learning his techniques and had painted the reproduction from the original. the sons think he did this and hid the original because of a nasty divorce he was going through. The sons sold the original to a private collector for $15,000,000.00. That's Fifteen million. Jim Patrick

PS. The bulk of Norman Rockwell's original painting were destroyed in a tragic fire when his studio burned to the ground in 1943.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Friday, February 03, 2017 - 02:05 pm:

Here are only two of the many Rockwell's I like:




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By steven miller on Friday, February 03, 2017 - 04:59 pm:

I have a print of photo #4 on my kitchen wall along with others.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Sims--Reed City,Mich. on Friday, February 03, 2017 - 06:17 pm:

The story of the painting breaking home ties, is just now on mysterys on the museum. the travel channel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Friday, February 03, 2017 - 06:22 pm:

Regarding the sale of that painting:

@ http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/30/nyregion/30rockwell.html


Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, February 03, 2017 - 07:04 pm:

Bill Harper - I think Norman Rockwell's art is in a class all by itself! Thanks so much for posting some of his work. Not sure I should admit this, but I can honestly say that it seems like I can remember almost every one of these, many of which were on the cover of the Saturday Evening Post, a magazine that my folks always subscribed to.

Ron in Central Massachusetts - This comment is of little value to anyone except maybe a few of the railroaders on this forum:

On that picture you posted, one little detail that I picked up on that I'm betting none of the other RR guys missed either is the kerosene lantern. That is very, very typical of a railroad lantern, which (as a 4th generation railroader) is a style that I particularly like. My Dad, gone since 1995, but a Chicago RR man from 1937 'till 1974 would have called that lantern a "hay-burner"! In fact, the term "hay-burner" was not really a railroad "slang" term at all on railroads around Chicago but was, and I think still is, generally understood and accepted. I think the reason for that is interesting. I always get too "long-winded", but let me just say, think Mrs. O'Leary's cow, the kerosene lantern and the Chicago fire! Pretty much known mostly by mid-westerners, especially around Chicago, the term "hay-burner lantern" stuck, even to this day! FWIW,..... harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, February 03, 2017 - 07:06 pm:

Bill Harper - I think Norman Rockwell's art is in a class all by itself! Thanks so much for posting some of his work. Not sure I should admit this, but I can honestly say that it seems like I can remember almost every one of these, many of which were on the cover of the Saturday Evening Post, a magazine that my folks always subscribed to.

Ron in Central Massachusetts - This comment is of little value to anyone except maybe a few of the railroaders on this forum:

On that picture you posted, one little detail that I picked up on that I'm betting none of the other RR guys missed either is the kerosene lantern. That is very, very typical of a railroad lantern, which (as a 4th generation railroader) is a style that I particularly like. My Dad, gone since 1995, but a Chicago RR man from 1937 'till 1974 would have called that lantern a "hay-burner"! In fact, the term "hay-burner" was not really a railroad "slang" term at all on railroads around Chicago but was, and I think still is, generally understood and accepted. I think the reason for that is interesting. I always get too "long-winded", but let me just say, think Mrs. O'Leary's cow, the kerosene lantern and the Chicago fire! Pretty much known mostly by mid-westerners, especially around Chicago, the term "hay-burner lantern" stuck, even to this day! FWIW,..... harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, February 03, 2017 - 07:08 pm:

Oops - Bad enough that I get too "wordy", but then get distracted and post twice! Sorry,....(:^)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, February 03, 2017 - 07:24 pm:

Interesting how the painting is described in that article, ". . . on the running board of an old truck" Hmm, one of the icons in that picture IS the "old Truck" which is a Model A Ford (30 or 31); at the time something as familiar as a model T to most adults.
Notice how subtly he tells why they're waiting there; just a hint of the railroad tracks in the very foreground, and a Brakeman's lantern on top of the red flag on a suitcase on the edge of the waiting platform, hinted at by the wood floor and one post of the roof with part of the overhang brace in the painting. This is enough for folks of the time to recognize a rural "Flag stop" on a railroad line. The books, the sticker on the suitcase, and his dress indicate going off to school, and the dog already missing his master. The rugged farm family sending their first member to college--the father already thinking back and his son brightly looking for the first sign of the train coming.
No wonder he was/is so well-remembered and popular; he could capture so much in one image.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, February 03, 2017 - 07:50 pm:

Harold,
Your posting came in while I was composing and correcting mine.
The detailing is so good that I can tell that that lantern is a tall globe Dietz Vesta, likely older than the model A (but not my much). These lanterns were as common as flashlights in their day--the were the Railroad-man's flashlight and signaling device, but today are rare enough to command pretty good prices (some much more than others). For those unfamiliar with them, you will find them with clear, red, amber, and blue globes, and very rarely with half-clear-half green. Each one had a special purpose. The green/clear ones were more often used in presentation lanterns (think: retirement, etc.) although I'm told they were also used by Pullman porters so they could read tickets without casting too much light about the car at night.
Back in the late 50's railroads turned to battery powered lanterns, and the kerosene lanterns could be found in piles at the yards waiting to be scrapped (augh!!--I was around then, but way too young to realize what was happening).
My grandmother always told me that we were "too soon old, and too late smart!"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Friday, February 03, 2017 - 08:08 pm:

Harold - you weren't too windy; I have always enjoyed your posts on here. And yet again, I have learned something from them - as I usually do.

I was born and raised in Massachusetts- so it's home. And because it's home, I came back here when I retired from the Army. I grew up in a Model A family that was active in the local club - Western Massachusetts Model A Ford Restorers Club. From March until December, there was rarely a weekend that did not include a club "run." They ranged from nursing home visits and local parades to tours of regional sites of significance. I remember several trips to Stockbridge, MA - which was Rockwell's longest and final residence. The town is the site of his museum and formed the backdrop for a significant number of his works. I remember seeing "Breaking Home Ties" in the Rockwell Museum as a kid on one of these club tours and being thrilled by it because it had a 30/31 Model A pickup truck in it (I have been a sucker for trucks and heavy equipment since I could walk - probably why I became a tanker). I didn't "get" the painting until my own went off to college; for the first time in almost 40 years of seeing that picture, I saw and understood the father. I suspect there's not a Dad out there (including my own), who doesn't know what I mean.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Friday, February 03, 2017 - 08:11 pm:

Damed phone autocorrect. **You weren't too wordy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By steven miller on Friday, February 03, 2017 - 09:38 pm:

That's okay Harold. I didn't hear you the first time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Friday, February 03, 2017 - 10:54 pm:

I have that 4th pic in a frame in the living room on the wall. I had a friend who lived on a farm and when it was sold I saved a couple barn boards. when i got the picture,I had a frame made from the old grey barn boards.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By thomas elliott nw pa on Saturday, February 04, 2017 - 12:27 am:

This is my age, in the garage painting the kid in the stripped shirt could have been me, of course I went into the service at 17 !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, February 04, 2017 - 02:44 pm:

At the risk of swelling his head (even more!), I think we have our own "Norman Rockwell" here; Richard Eagle.
I think one of his paintings should make the cover of the Vintage Ford!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Saturday, February 04, 2017 - 02:53 pm:

I second that motion! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Saturday, February 04, 2017 - 03:00 pm:

Richard Eagle - I think you'd better start giving this some serious thought Rich,....'cause we're not gonna' leave you alone! I think this is a great idea!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Saturday, February 04, 2017 - 03:54 pm:

I am embarrassed and flattered to be mentioned in a discussion of Mr.Rockwell. He made a good living doing what he liked. The expressions, colors and composition was amazing. He touched a nerve at a special time when America was a different place. Yet they stressed he was an illustrator rather than an Artist. I don't believe he enjoyed his work any more than I do.
I have been privileged to find an audience for what I do with folks that enjoy similar things. It is a luxury to fiddle around with paint at my leisure and not have to meet deadlines.
As always I thank the forum members for their encouragement. It sometimes helps me keep at it.
I have offered my Art and photos to Susan and others. We shall see what happens.
Thanks to all.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Glowacki on Saturday, February 04, 2017 - 04:20 pm:

Norman Rockwell portrayed an America that is no longer with us and I believe we are poorer for that lost America.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Saturday, February 04, 2017 - 04:22 pm:

Rich,

I too hope the Vintage Ford prints some of your art work...My parakeet cage needs new paper in the bottom. :-):-):-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Saturday, February 04, 2017 - 04:53 pm:

Dennis, your parakeet has good taste. Especially with a little basil, rosemary, and garlic. Some of my serious Artist friends find their work into the Goodwill and Salivation Army thrift stores. It is what it is.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Saturday, February 04, 2017 - 05:35 pm:

LOL! :-O


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Saturday, February 04, 2017 - 07:43 pm:

Rich, We eagerly await another or more of your paintings. Winter in Idaho has a tendency to keep one indoors.....might be a good time to paint?

Anyway, whenever you get to it, I'm sure we'll enjoy it!

One of your faithful fans,

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Saturday, February 04, 2017 - 07:46 pm:

Rich, we eagerly await another one or more of your paintings. Winter in Idaho tends to keep one inside... Maybe a good time to do a painting?

I personally think the comparison of you and Norman Rockwell makes sense.

One of your faithful fans,

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Saturday, February 04, 2017 - 08:04 pm:

Randy,

I respectfully disagree.

The Tapestry may change but the Story is unchanged.

Every day in this country I meet people going about their day much the same way they did years ago.

They might be from different places - their jobs might be a little different - but the American Spirit remains largely unbroken.

For some - it was Norman Rockwell who chronicled this country - for others a bit younger like me - it was Charles Kuralt.

I remember vividly " On The Road with him crossing America.

In a way that is kinda what I do - mostly thru images & short stories on Instagram & Facebook - I have started to add short videos.

The common thread here - if you love this country & the people you meet traveling it - if you can somehow convey thru a medium what you experience - you share with others.

I am truly blessed.

Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Saturday, February 04, 2017 - 08:12 pm:

Thanks Keith. I have a Model T one that is close to being finished. I will post it in a few days.

Back to Norman Rockwell. I talked with a friend today that was from Vermont. I remember him saying some family members posed for Mr. Rockwell's work. He told me about one who was the model for his famous Boy Scout painting. I see there were several that it could be. It is a small world.
Thanks
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Saturday, February 04, 2017 - 08:29 pm:

Hi Rich, We'll look forward to it.....

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Saturday, February 04, 2017 - 09:04 pm:

Ben Sharpsteen did a fantastic series of early automobile paintings that were featured on the covers of the Horseless Carriage Gazzette back in the mid 1960's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Saturday, February 04, 2017 - 11:38 pm:

I have a good friend lucky enough to be a recipient of one of Rich's paintings done especially for him.

It hangs in his office with great pride. Every time I meet up with my friend I look at that painting and think how lucky he is to have that incredible painting.

I was fortunate to visit with Rich with my friend a few years ago. He took us to lunch in his White bus, it was a bit on the cool side but even more cool to be driven around in the White.

just sayin'

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Sunday, February 05, 2017 - 12:24 am:

Thanks Howard. Joe and I still remember and talk about that day. We enjoyed some great information and nice comments from you two. It's even more fun to hear what is going on with you and your cars now. I am glad the paining is being enjoyed. It was a great trade for me.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil Haywood on Sunday, February 05, 2017 - 11:54 pm:

Born a raised in Stockbridge and still live
there. My older brother was in one of his
paintings.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, February 06, 2017 - 01:09 am:

Yes, Ben Sharpsteen did some great illustrations. Ben had quite a sense of humor, and if you look around there is always something funny going on in his illustrations. One of them made the cover of the MAFCA magazine, "The Restorer" showing a man working under his A, with one hand reaching in the toolbox alongside. The toolbox is empty, and his small son is sitting next to it with his toy car, and all the wrenches, etc. scattered around him.
Rich, no pressure, just do some wide paintings of T subjects, and one of them will be great to submit for a cover! :-)
BTW, Ben's son Tom was a great guy and a real model T person. He had a '14 that had mostly DB T parts on it. I have his mag charger and home-built HCCT


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Monday, February 06, 2017 - 02:00 pm:

As many of you know, Ben Sharpsteen worked for Walt Disney. He directed 31 films between 1920 and 1980.
Ward Kimball also was an animator for Disney.
Both participated in the HCCA events and other fun. I wish I had lived closer to LA back then.
David, this afternoon I will build some frames for canvas proportional to the magazine cover size. I don't use Brass Tacks to attach the canvas like Rich Bingham does.
Getting something suitable and finding space there may or may not happen. It is a worthy exercise.
Thanks
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Monday, February 06, 2017 - 02:23 pm:

I'll give you some if you'd like, Rich !

Guess I just have this "thing" for brass - brass tacks, brass stirrup bindings, brass spots on harness, best of all, finally, a brass T.

Your work on the magazine cover would be simply grand to see! Guess you know I've been a fan of your work for over 50 years !!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Poane on Monday, February 06, 2017 - 06:31 pm:

Thanks for posting this Bill, I love Norman's work and have many of his books.......

All who saw your post at the very least 'smiled!'


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, February 06, 2017 - 06:50 pm:

Ah, getting down to Brass Tacks are we?? :-)
Rich, I was lucky enough to have visited a few times with Ward and Betty at some Railroad History Preservation Forums. I guess everyone else was to shy to sit down with them at lunch, Not ME! They were both very gracious, unassuming folks, with good memories too! Knowing Tom Sharpsteen, I can't imagine his Dad being much different. The "old men" as they were known (the early animators) were a special bunch! They also liked Jazz and started the "Firehouse Five" Dixieland band in Disneyland. Credit for the preservation and popularization of Dixieland Jazz likely should go to them.
Ah well, what do I know?
David D.
PS, Ben was, I believe, one of the founding members of the HCCA.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Monday, February 06, 2017 - 09:14 pm:

David, I'm glad you got to visit with Ward and Betty. I used to read about the folks in the early clubs and they seemed bigger than Life. I met a few of the HCCA folks in the 80's. They were down to earth and welcoming to newcomers. It is fun to hear those stories.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Monday, February 06, 2017 - 09:42 pm:

Each pic takes you to that time and they are American classics. Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 - 02:15 am:

Rich, I've been lucky in my life to have met quite a few really neat folks and to be friends with a few. Just lost one last year, Jim Tangeman. Folk here have probably never heard of him, but he was into Ts way back "when" and still had his TT closed cab with an overhead valve engine (I don't remember which one), two speed rear end and an accessory transmission, something like 16 speed forward and 8 in reverse, I think he told me. It would do 55 on the highway, and run so slow in the orchards they could just let it run and load it as it went along.
He was also a steam genius and was a Director of the Steam Power Club of America. Through him I met and road in Barney Becker's Doble roadster, Talked with Bill Bessler, Chad O-Conner (who built the two locomotives at the Promontory National Monument), and many other folks in the steamboating community.
OK, that sounds like name dropping, that's not how it's meant; your comment made me think back, and at our ages, there's a LOT of thinking back to do! When did all that time go by?
Anyways, all those folks, who seemed to me to be bigger than life seemed to be nice, earthy folks. OK, some of us are a "bit" eccentric!
And with this forum, I've gotten to know a lot of other significant folks, Like Rich, Uncle Stan, Terry Horlick, Sheldon Colin, Erik (and his Dad, Roger Barrett, and--egads, the list goes on!!
Y'all take care, think I need to sign off now!
Run 'em if ya got 'em!


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