Anyone need this bolt

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Anyone need this bolt
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, February 06, 2017 - 12:04 pm:

Got some bolt like this in a box lot of rusty model T stuff yesterday at a swap meet. Anyone know it's application.


bolt


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donald Conklin on Monday, February 06, 2017 - 12:10 pm:

I think it's called an elevator bolt, it has a larger diameter but shallower head than a carriage bolt.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, February 06, 2017 - 12:36 pm:

It looks like the bolts used to hold the hood former to the firewall on a '15-'16 T?
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/321700.html?1352788148


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, February 06, 2017 - 02:17 pm:

I would say it is an elevator bolt (sometimes called a plow bolt, but they're a little different too). Notice the head is flat, or almost so, and the bottom is tapered. Usually the Model T used Step Bolts, the head is about this same size, but the bottom is flat and the top is crowned, but not as high as a carriage bolt (actually it might be the same height, but the larger head makes it look shallower.
You used to be able to pick these up, off the shelf, at Orchard Supply Hardware, back when Al Smith ran the show.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Monday, February 06, 2017 - 02:26 pm:

Definitely not a plow bolt. Elevator bolt, pretty sure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Monday, February 06, 2017 - 02:27 pm:

Isn't that the bolt that goes through the body and seat frame that's exposed on the outside of the 15-20 Touring cars?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, February 06, 2017 - 05:18 pm:

A plow bolt is has a flat head and a taper under that and then a square. They have that flat top so that when fitted to a plow share they cause no obstruction as the soil passes over the tine. The square under the head stops it from turning as the nut is tensioned.
The same bolt is used in wood floors. The flat head offers no obstruction in the floor surface, and the square under the head stops the bolt turning as the nut is done up, just as it does on a carriage bolt.
This bolt is different. The flat head will still sit a little proud of the surface. The square will still stop it turning as the nut is done up. The shallow taper under the head is likely to be pulled into whatever medium it is fitted. I have no idea what that application might be.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willis Jenkins on Monday, February 06, 2017 - 05:33 pm:

It's an elevator bolt used on antique cars that have wooden running boards to bolt them down. Then linoleum covers the wood and bolts.

Willis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, February 06, 2017 - 06:28 pm:

John, No the bolt fond on the touring cars is a step bolt.
Yes, Allen is right, the plow bolt has a steeper taper on the back side, and almost a sharp edge, that's why this is an Elevator bolt, called as such as they were used to bolt down the floors in industrial elevators. The floors were usually pine or fir, and the bolt would compress into them leaving a smooth, or nearly so surface. The plow bolt has too much of a taper to it (like a flat head wood screw)to provide a solid compression into the wood. And yes, these were frequently used to bolt down wooden running boards, which were then usually covered with "Battleship linoleum" and aluminum or brass edging.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Monday, February 06, 2017 - 06:32 pm:

Elevator bolt; used to secure flat canvass belting together. Dad used plenty of them in his grain elevator.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Monday, February 06, 2017 - 06:56 pm:

Just look at your overhead garage door. There are plenty there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carl Sorenson-Montrose,CO on Monday, February 06, 2017 - 08:04 pm:

We used them on sand / aggregate "elevator" to hold the buckets on to the belt...Our belt was 16" wide with over a hundred buckets...Each bucket had 5 bolt per bucket ...I've used a lot of those in the 35 years I worked there ...Carl


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A Bartsch on Monday, February 06, 2017 - 08:18 pm:

We called them 'wagon box bolts', these held the floorboards of the grain wagons to the frame, drawn up tight the shovel would not catch on them. Maybe incorrect, we did not have an elevator on the farm. jb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, February 06, 2017 - 09:03 pm:

I did wonder if that shallow taper was to allow the bolt head to drawn into a softer substrate than timber. Fabric and leather belting in elevators would fit the bill. I have never noticed them in use before

James, your 'wagon box bolts' were more likely plow bolts. These are countersunk into the floor to keep a smooth surface. I can't see the elevator bolts being drawn up tight enough in a hardwood floor to pull the head flush or below the floor surface.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Monday, February 06, 2017 - 09:19 pm:

A wagon rack would not use plow bolts or the bolt pictured! Years ago i built two wagon racks out of treated 2x6 toung and groove lumber with carrage bolts and not a nail to be found.Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 - 02:15 am:

Ah, so that's where the name "Elevator" came from. My assumption was wrong! (not the first time, I'm afraid!). Still, the "in use" is pretty much as I explained. An old wagon rack would most likely use step bolts, although carriage bolts would work, just doesn't spread the compression load on the wood as well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 - 07:10 am:

Kenneth, we may have a new language problem. Can you explain to this Aussie what wagon racks are.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 - 09:41 am:

Allan,The floor or deck of a wooden wagon or truck rack,and not to be confused with what we call a [Nice Rack] Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 - 10:30 am:

As far as I know, there is no application for an elevator bolt on a T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RalphS in NE Oregon on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 - 12:10 pm:

I rebuilt the wood floor in my old manure spreader a few years back, and the old boards were held on with elevator bolts. I suspect that the reason they are called elevator bolts is that they elevate the drag chain and cross bars in the bed so that they move easier through the spreader. I didn't have replacement bolts so I used standard carriage bolts with a large fender washer under them to achieve the same effect.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 - 01:33 pm:

I did one myself and while i do not remember the bolts i remember when i found out the floor was tapered!!! I was using old/scrounged hardwood flooring and the spreader was about 2 and 1/2" wider in the back than the front!! Bud,been there,done that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 - 06:39 pm:

AsI suspected Ken. It is a language problem. A rack to me is some kind of vertical storage, like shelves, but not necessarily having a continuous flat floor. What is wrong with calling a floor a floor??? Cheers.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 - 07:49 pm:

Allan,With my spelling i have to stick with USA farm talk. I do not know if they are/were a perfect match for the bolt pictured but there were special bolts for holding wear strips on elevator/lift guide rails.In some places there were special bolts holding wear strips in conveyors also.I do know the smooth heads on Model TT truck floors and side racks were faced up and in not to tear grain sacks.Why when we go out for rib's why do they ask if you wan a 1/2 or a full rack of rib's?? My real name is Kenneth but many years ago they decided to call me bud,because with 3 letters i might be able to spell that!!! All in fun Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 - 10:10 pm:

Hey Kenneth, in Aus if you have a name of more than one syllable, it will be shortened. Sorry about my familiarity.

Allan from down under.


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