Early steering wheel needs repair

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Early steering wheel needs repair
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 - 11:33 am:

Three of the four screw holes in my 13's original one piece wood steering wheel rim are stripped.

Any suggestions?

I was thinking of filling the screw holes with something like "J-B WoodWeld" or "KwikWood Epoxy Putty" then making new holes in the same spot.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 - 11:38 am:

Or maybe the wood toothpick and glue trick, like folks do on body wood. Then, a little filler and sanding to blend in.

Do the new screw holes have to be in the same spot? Since the steering wheel is round, why not index it around a bit and drive the screws into fresh wood?

Just askin'. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 - 11:44 am:

To me using things like; "J-B WoodWeld" or "KwikWood Epoxy Putty" is ok for spot repair on a wood face but I don't know that I would trust on something that is pulled and twisted. I like Mark's suggestion, turn the wheel for new wood, then use one of those products colored to match the wood to fill the old holes. Or, could you use larger screws?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 - 01:03 pm:

Having used it on my original '14 steering rim, I can tell you that the toothpick method works well. If the threads ever do loosen up again, drill the holes oversize and glue in fluted hardwood dowels. Redrill and you're good for another hundred years. Or your wheel is.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 - 01:10 pm:

Take a small wood dowel, sharpen the end in a pencil sharpener, drive it the hole along with some wood glue or epoxy, let it dry, smooth it over, put your screws back in.

I would really suggest that you not use any kind of fillers other than actual wood.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 - 01:32 pm:

When I was a hyper, ornery, mean and playful brat I used to swing back and forth on my bedroom door, feet off the floor. Resulted in the hinges coming right out of the door frame. Dad did the toothpick thing, worked great, 'cause I kept on swinging! The paddling didn't work, that's for sure!! Ha ha. :-) I'm still hyper, ornery, mean and moderately playful BTW. I just don't swing on doors anymore.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 - 02:31 pm:

If you are going to drill out the holes to fill them, don't use doweling, use wood plugs; the grain orientation will hold the screw MUCH better.
Tim, I used to swing on doors too, then one day I spotted the refrigerator door and started to swing on it--OOOPS! Fortunately for me, it didn't tip over on me, but I did slide most of the food out of it. Never swung on a door since! (And I still remember it; funny the stuff that sticks with you.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 - 02:54 pm:

David - Great story! I'm thinking that that particular childhood mishap "stuck with you", partly because of the stuff that "stuck to you"! Ha,ha,.... harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine on Thursday, February 09, 2017 - 01:36 am:

Thanks guys; great tips.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jesse L. Ashcraft on Thursday, February 09, 2017 - 10:22 am:

>>>...toothpicks...<<<

Yeah. My Dad taught me to fill in the stripped out hole with wooden matchsticks so the same screw can bite in to it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Albert Lemon on Thursday, February 09, 2017 - 11:21 am:

I've used steel wool packed firm, NOT TIGHT. Worked everytime and done it many times.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, February 09, 2017 - 12:57 pm:

The toothpick solution works even better if you put some glue on the toothpick first. I just finished doing that on an old reed organ.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip Berg on Thursday, February 09, 2017 - 02:59 pm:

Constantine,

I salvaged the original rear floor boards for my 11 touring by drilling and pressing in hardwood dowels of appropriates size. Used Elmers carpenter glue to secure, then drilled new holes for the screws and presto all is good.


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