Model T Grief And Woes

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Model T Grief And Woes
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lenney Glenn on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 09:18 am:

What is your biggest mistake while working on or driving your Tee.(I sure wish I had removed the bendix first)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 09:51 am:

Taking it apart. Had I just given it a good inspection and maybe new wires when I bought the car I'd have thousands of miles on it by now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Cicciarelli on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 09:59 am:

Lenny, why do you wish you had removed the bendix?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lenney Glenn on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 10:06 am:

Tim, I did the same thing with my first Tee. LEARNED THE SAME LESSON !!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill in Adelaida Calif on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 10:07 am:

wish T had checked the rear hub nuts when I added auxiliary brakes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 10:09 am:

I think Lenny is saying he wished he had removed the Bendix before removing the starter. If you don't, it can tear up the magneto coil ring.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tod Wirth - Richfield, WI on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 10:11 am:

Some years ago now, I managed to drop one of the washers in the transmission. Got it out without taking the transmission cover off, but it burned up a couple of hours and most of my pride.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lenney Glenn on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 10:11 am:

Rick, I butchered the magneto coils. Now I remove the starter bendix BEFORE I remove the starter bolts,


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 10:58 am:

Oh, this one was a deusie:
My '15 Touring had been retrofitted with a starter, but as that model-year had not been designed to accommodate one, it has also not been designed for easy access. _The mechanic who installed the starter, no doubt, had had to overcome some significant obstacles to make the modification—as I was to learn.

Well, one day, my starter suddenly stopped working and, of course, from that point, it became a matter of hand-cranking the car until I could get the starter rebuilt. _Dismounting the starter was a bear of job because one of the mounting bolts was blocked behind the driver's side firewall mounting bracket. _Gaining access would mean lifting the front end of the body off the frame about four inches worth, which would mean disconnecting the spark and throttle linkages; the steering column mounting bracket; getting the wooden hood-shelves out of the way to access the fronts of the firewall mounting brackets; disconnecting the firewall from the radiator bracing rod, which would mean dismounting the coil box so I wouldn't be screwing the radiator bracing rod through the coil box; and unbolting the rear sides of the firewall mounting brackets, which seemed impossible at first, because access to the driver's side bolt was so completely blocked (ironically, by the starter), that there was no way to get a finger-tip in there, let alone a wrench. _

And finally, after having gotten all that stuff was out of the way, I still needed to unbolt the body and lift the front end of it off the frame to get at that last stupid mounting bolt on the stupid starter.

Doing this job involved quite a lot of creativity and time, so if you ever need to dismount the starter on your '15 Touring, PLEASE get in touch with me so I can mail you the paper instructions on how it's done, because there is a trick to it and if you know that trick going in, what looks like an impossible, lengthy job becomes an easy, lengthy job.

And now, the punch-line:
After re-installing the rebuilt starter, the %#$@ing thing still wouldn't work. _Why not? _Because, as it turned out, there had been nothing wrong with my starter in the first place. _My battery had died and replacing it was a ridiculously easy thing to do.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 10:59 am:

My biggest mistake was making friends with a guy who had one. He let me drive it. I was never the same after that.
Rich, Thanks
Thanks Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 11:05 am:

Grief ?? Woe ?!? What's the matter with you guys ?? I thought we have Ts because we LIKE to suffer - getting filthy, skinning knuckles and pinching fingers is our idea of fun !!

You want it easy, drive an "econo-box" and play video games.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 11:16 am:

Somewhere in the mists of my earliest forgotten memories, SOMEONE
piqued my interest in old stuff and organic things ... old barns, rusty junk,
open fields, forests, weathered wood, spindly trestles, things that steam,
spoked wheels .... the list is endless.

So, instead of a dull and easy life of late model KIA's, vinyl siding, and
all that other stuff a person can get anywhere, any time, and without a
solitary brain impulse, I am gripped with the endless desire to surround
myself with things that need fixing, are missing unobtainium parts, or are
just plain clutter, from a practical sense !

I do not think I consciously made this life-altering mistake, but someone
poisoned my mind before I knew it had happened, and now look at the
mess I am in !!! Justlook at all this junk !





Of course, I wouldn't have it any other way, ... but that sounds just like
talking to any other 2-bit junkie about his drug of choice, doesn't it ?

x


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 11:19 am:

Bitten by a bendix......rats!
:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Barker, Somerset, England on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 11:27 am:

Tod Wirth.
Ditto


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 11:42 am:

Bob's starter story is similar to an experience I had. When I bought my 1923 touring the seller pointed out that the starter was shot and would have to be rebuilt. When I got the car home and installed a new battery the starter somehow miraculously cured itself.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 11:49 am:

My biggest mistake was going down the road and realizing I was still on battery and decided to switch to MAG at speed.... made a big bang...Scared the cr** out of the policeman in the next lane over Oh well live and learn!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 11:50 am:

Oh wo is me ,I need more room for another T!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 12:43 pm:

I have only two things (so far). I bought my '21 Touring at a show/swap meet and didn't see all the parts that were supposed to be included with the car. Turns out some things were not but I think I got a very good deal on the car anyway. I should have gotten a couple of hundred off the price, but I'm ok.
The other thing is I began posting and asking questions on here before I got the car home. Someone pointed out how often I was on here, and I realize now that I could have figured out the answers to most of my questions myself once I got the car home, but that's ok too.
No mechanical screw-ups yet. Well, I did take a front wheel and tire to a local tire store to get it repaired and they ruined the tube so I spent $30.00 on a new tube and went to Harbor Freight and bought tire tools so I can repair my own now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Sullivan on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 01:12 pm:

Burger, you think that's junk? What a piker! Loosing respect already. Dave in Bellingham,WA


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 01:26 pm:

Grinding spindle bushings too far made them loose had to do a complete repurchase and redo.

Differential redo -- keeps getting deeper and deeper and deeper. Latest is thrust pin removal and replacement ordeal. Those that have done a differential redo need to get a medal or a certificate or be allowed to join the exclusive 'I have redone a T differential' club.

Puncturing brand new $26 tubes with tire tool.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 01:35 pm:

The last big job I have left to do before I drive my car for the first time is to disassemble and check the rear end and install my new driveshaft and pinion bearing. I'm really dreading the job and may have some grief and woe before the job is over.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 02:16 pm:

Ignacio and Tommy, it is not difficult its just time consuming. Get the book and step by step. The forum talked me through it. If I can do it, its pretty easy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 02:48 pm:

@Dallas for me alot has been waiting on parts: left casing, right sleeve and pins where back ordered for awhile.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Strickling on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 04:16 pm:

It is a tie between these two:
Tightening bands too tight and breaking a transmission drum. No antifreeze equals cracked head.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 04:17 pm:

Contact Andy Loso. He is on forum. He is a swell guy and can hook you up with parts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 04:45 pm:

I should have done a compression test on the engine BEFORE buying the car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Zachary Dillinger - Charlotte, MI on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 04:50 pm:

So far, it was using metal wire to hold the band ears together after changing the linings... lost a piece down the cover and, being young and stupid, didn't notice. Never could get the car to run on mag until I took it all apart for a rebuild and found a 2" long bit of the wire shorting out the field coil. Incredibly lucky that no real damage was done.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 06:52 pm:

Me? Not removing or shorting the generators on two dormant model T's before crank starting them last fall. TWO of them!
Neither unit had a 6 volt battery hooked into the non-existent wiring, of course.
I'll put my Dunce Cap back on now. It's right over there on the stool in the corner.
And head to the chalkboard; "I can still learn from my mistakes." Repeat ad nauseam...
:-)
Ignacio, I like that notion of a certificate or a medal!

(Message edited by Duey_C on February 13, 2017)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Raynor in Southampton on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 07:44 pm:

Spent 6 hours hand sanding and finishing each wheel over last week. Then decided to bring them to Calimers this past Friday to check them to see if they are road worthy just to have him tell me they were "maybe" good enough for a trailer queen but definitely unsafe for touring. I did not notice each wheel had a gap between the felloe and rim ,and some spokes had hair line cracks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 07:44 pm:

As a teenager I did more than my fair share at helping my Dad's hair turn gray. We had two garage doors. But one of them the water didn't really drain away from the door. So Dad added about a 2 inch high bump where the door came down so the water would not pool up and enter the garage. So one side you could drive the T in with the top up. The other side you had to remember to let the top down (you didn't have to undo all the two man bow attachments -- just let it down and after you were in you could put it up.) I forgot one day and drove in the shorter side with the top up. It has had the top down ever since.

As John Maxwell likes to say, "Sometimes you win and sometimes you learn."

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry P on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 08:28 pm:

In early 1968 I bought a 31 model A coupe for $25.00 brought it home and a friend and I started to dismantle it for restoration. One day a Customs Officer showed up on the yard and showed me a bill of sale that was dated before mine and hauled my dream away! Part of my diet is rusted metal but if I were to do it over I would have found another not quite so rusted car back in 68 and would have had the fun of driving it all these years. The T came along in 1991 when I really didn't have the time to devote to it with working and raising a family. If I would have had the time I would have tried to find a few more junkers to get parts off of. Never mind how easy it would have been to find T's in 1968!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 08:48 pm:

Leave a rag in the transmission after changing bands. You will understand grief and woe.... It requires a complete tear down of the engine to the last little part to remove all the "fluff". It is amazing how much "fluff" one single rag can make and how it will fit into every little hole, seam, or crack in the entire engine. I had to remove the rings from the pistons, tear the transmission, completely down. It was awfull... :-( :-( I now count the rags going in, write the number down, and count them coming out. or I use a complete "bed sheet" for the "rag". A complete sheet would be almost impossible to miss, and is only one single item ... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 09:25 pm:

My first almost serious disaster was in 1970 when I first got the car and was removing the right front wheel. Thinking it was RH thread, I came close to breaking off the spindle. Luckily, I was a weak 160 lb. kid and disaster did not ensue. Had I the strength and weight I am now (240 lbs) I would have easily sheared off the spindle, stripped the threads or broken the nut. My Dad saved the day when he came out and stopped me. Taking a close look at the threads, he saw the problem and easily removed the LH nut, to my utter amazement. My hero... Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 10:13 pm:

I just missed a really sharp 25 sedan for $3000.00 from a estate sale that ran and drove. Never restored always garaged when not in use and the man that got to the car before me is going to street rod it... I understand good parts come out of rods but what a nice old car to ruin. My only grief with T s today. Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 10:26 pm:

Semi-T-related ....

A story floated "around the neighborhood" about "the old Packard"
for my entire growing up years. Finally got fed up with the ambiguous
tale and decided to hunt it down. It turned out to be a 23 Twin-Six
town car. Needed tires after being in a basement since 1947. Came
with 3 spare engines, a half dozen transmissions, and a bulk of NOS
parts that filled an area 3x the size of the car. Could have been mine
for $10K.

I still ache over that one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick J. Gunter -- Sparta, Missouri, USA on Tuesday, February 14, 2017 - 09:18 am:

My biggest mistake was trying to "build" a Model T from the ground-up by finding all the parts. I started collecting Model T parts back in 1972, when I was 13 years old. The parts were everywhere and farmers would practically give the stuff away. Complete, unrestored Model Ts were actually hard to find in southern Missouri. Around here, they didn't park many in the barn and save them. Nearly all of them were junked out during the depression and WWII. Everyone I knew that was "restoring" a Model T, was actually assembling them from the farmers scrap yards.

Well, I put together a 1915 Runabout but never finished it. Then life happened: I went to college, got married, lived in the big city, and moved many times. My Model T and collection of parts stayed in my dad's barn for several decades.

I sold the 1915 in 2007, but continued to collect parts. I lost my job as a software engineer in defense industry and decided to make a career move. I am now trying to become an author of historical fiction and non-fiction books. So, the Model T dream is still on the back burner, for now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Tuesday, February 14, 2017 - 11:44 am:

About two years ago a friend came over to get help rebuilding his rear axle. I have the necessary fixtures and experience, so it all went quite well. The left side was mounted vertically and we set the ring gear clearance with new bronze washers. Then we set up the right side and set the clearance for the second bronze washer. All went just fine, so we buttoned it up and loaded into his truck. We then saw the inner Hyatt bearing in the bed of the truck.....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Dugger on Tuesday, February 14, 2017 - 12:13 pm:

Break an axle 1/4 mile from home!!!!!!
Pinch your middle finer between the flywheel and mag ring, and show everyone the "bird " when they ask what happened!


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