Old Photo - Fitting A Body To A Newly Delivered Model T Touring Car

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Old Photo - Fitting A Body To A Newly Delivered Model T Touring Car
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 10:37 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 10:58 am:

Right out of the box-car ? Are they forgetting to put the splash a aprons on first ? Building in the background looks like the railway station. It would have been great to see several photos of this scene from different angles, including the steam engine and grain separator in the background.

Any clues as to the year of the T ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 11:27 am:

It's really hard to tell, but maybe it's a '14 runabout, and there is still time to get the splash shields in!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 11:28 am:

Definitely a RR Depot in the background. The picture appears like it was taken from inside the boxcar.
No doubt that traction engine (Advance Rumely??) and threshing drum was just unloaded from an adjoining flatcar.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 02:24 pm:

As usual, the bosses in the bowler hats are lending a helping hand. That's as hands on as they get.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 02:35 pm:

Dale, did Rumley build steam engines ? I've seen a few "oil pulls", don't know nothin' about the "advance" or Rumley history. I expect that threshing rig came in the freight too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 04:48 pm:

Yes, Rumely bought up Advance and renamed them Advance Rumelys. They also built those gasoline/kerosene "Oil Pulls" at the same time. Rumely expanded rapidly (maybe a bit TOO rapidly!), buying up competitors like Garr Scott, Northwest Thresher Co., Aultmann Taylor and American Abell. When the markets crashed in 1929, Allis Chalmers in turn scooped them up for a song.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 05:16 pm:

Hey guys.....maybe their taking it off!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 05:26 pm:

Page 17 of Henry L. Dominguez's "The Ford Agency" has the same photo. The caption reads: " A Cadiz, Ohio, Ford dealer receives a new shipment of Model T Fords. Since Model T's were shipped disassembled, this dealer is having the cars partly assembled at the railroad siding for the trip to his agency. (Photo from Ford Archives). Note the early Model Ts were shipped fully assembled and came with a not that said be sure to add oil etc. before starting the car. But sometime by 1913 they were shipping them knocked down. Thank you to Rob Heyen for posting the following from the May 25, 1913 Indianapolis Star newspaper:





Unfortunately, the men are standing in the way of many of the clues we would like to see. I.e. what type of rear axle, what type of rear frame member, what type of turtle deck as well as what type of turtle deck handles, etc. A higher resolution photo might show if the top bows are the earlier oval style or later rectangular style.

I believe we can see that the left rear wheel is a non-demountable round felloe wheel which would put the upper limit as late 1917 or early 1918 according to Bruce (see the entry on wheels below).

And there is not any tread on the rear tires. The note below inidcates the treaded rear tires began appearing in 1916 but it doesn't say when the smoth ones stopped being used on the rear.

Ref: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/U-Z.htm#wheels
(The front tires remained smooth. The treaded rear tires began appearing during 1916.) The felloes were changed to “square” instead of being rounded, apparently in late 1917 or early 1918 according to a letter dated April 16, 1918 at the Ford Archives.

The MTFCI 7th Judging Guidelines shares they believe the 1915 and earlier were smooth rear tires with 1916 and later having tread on the rear tires. Another one where some early photo might help to clarify that and again how much overlap?

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Trent Boggess on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 10:08 pm:

According to one Ford dealer from that time, he would hire a couple of high school boys to unload the box cars and assemble the cars. The tools they used were a monkey wrench, a pair of pliers and an ice pick - to line up the holes with.

Respectfully submitted,

Trent Boggess


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Allen - Conroe, TX on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 10:38 pm:

"It is surprising what little damage occurs to the automobiles by shipping in this manner"

They didn't say NO damage I notice.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Monday, February 13, 2017 - 10:46 pm:

could those cars be right hand drive???? charley


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