Safety wire.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Safety wire.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jonathan Delancey on Wednesday, February 15, 2017 - 04:10 pm:

I see safety wire used where you don't want a nut to back off. Can I use removable Loctite instead?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Dugger on Wednesday, February 15, 2017 - 04:26 pm:

If you see safety wire use it , don't take a chance.

It could be a costly short cut, and the safety wire is there for a reason.
Don't take a chance and a shortcut

Just my humble words.!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Wednesday, February 15, 2017 - 04:43 pm:

I safety-wired a couple of unusual things on my Flivver, including the screw-in plug at the bottom of my carburetor bowl. _I figure if that thing vibrates loose when the engine is hot, only bad things can follow. _

The other thing I safety-wired, believe it or not, is the oil-plug at the bottom of the engine. _I prefer not to over-tighten that thing because I already stripped the threads on one plug—and I certainly don't want to strip the threads on the engine—so I torque the plug very gently. _To keep it from vibrating loose, I drilled a 1/32nd-inch hole across one of the corners of the plug's hexagon and safety wired it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Wednesday, February 15, 2017 - 06:52 pm:

In some areas Ford did some testing and decided to remove safety wire / cotter pins during later production, replaced by a washer or lock washer.

Examples are pan bolts (from december 1924) inner magnet bolts on the flywheel (from the early 20's?) and the front nuts in the rear radius rods (from some time in 1926)

For the pan and magnet bolts there are no problems to follow Ford's example on earlier engines too, but for the radius rods you'll need the latest 1927 style that only uses one nut per side.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen D Heatherly on Wednesday, February 15, 2017 - 07:14 pm:

Jonathan, I would use wire anywhere where wire was originally installed. Wire is cheap and easy enough to install that there's really no reason to try and use other methods. In non-critical areas Loctite should be good enough as long as the bolt and nut are both completely oil free.

Stephen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Thursday, February 16, 2017 - 01:22 pm:

OTOH

There is no safety wire on most nuts and fittings on modern cars. Depends on your expertise to evaluate proper usage of modern locking methods.

Loctite and nyloc nut can be good

YMMV


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Olson on Saturday, February 18, 2017 - 11:50 am:

If seeing is believing for you, watch this European DIN standard test of different "fastener locking systems"

http://www.nord-lock.com/bolted/watch-the-new-junker-test-video-here/

Hopefully no experts will be offended by actual data.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Saturday, February 18, 2017 - 01:15 pm:

Impressive video. A great idea, I have never seen those type of lock washers here in the states.

So it appears that the Loctite methods may be the best commonly available next to a proper safety wire job. Too bad they didn't show some of those tests that may have revealed how the wire can be worn thru and come loose or the Loctite glue bond fractured.

Thanks for posting


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Eliason...........Whittier, CA on Saturday, February 18, 2017 - 01:51 pm:

Keep in mind there are locations that should always be safety wired such as the front radius rod ball cap studs and castle nuts. Since the studs are threaded into the socket they could back out unless they are properly wired together. Loctite MIGHT keep the studs from turning loose, but safety wire can be visually inspected in this location just by looking under the car.

wire


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jason Kuczynski on Saturday, February 18, 2017 - 01:55 pm:

If you do wire, make sure it's installed so that when it is pulled it will pull the bolt tight. There are many great resources on how to wire more than one bolt together, and the patterns you should use. I used to have to do 58 1/4"12 point bolts with one piece of safety wire, in a positive direction... even neutral was frowned upon but usually unavoidable. That was on gas turbines, though, a T wouldn't be as critical. ;)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Phillip Maurici on Saturday, February 18, 2017 - 02:13 pm:

Airplanes safety wire almost every bolt. Would not want to fly a plane without it.
The wishbone studs at the ball end have to be safety wired. The studs can back out if only cotter keys are used.


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