Canadian mufflers

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Canadian mufflers
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, February 20, 2017 - 06:51 am:

I have just assembled 3 new mufflers to take to the Ballarat Swap meet this coming weekend. I make them with a slightly heavier gauge mounting bracket and shells.

The Canadian mufflers have a separate deflector riveted to the rear end. It points directly to the ground.

I make the inlet pipe with an expanded end to accept the standard T exhaust pipe. This upset is the shoulder that the front end is wedged against.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Monday, February 20, 2017 - 08:25 am:

Hi Allan,

Nicely done! A very workmanlike job. I have seen pictures of the Canadian muffler, with it's downward pointing deflector, before and could not for the life of me figure out why it never appeared on American produced cars unless it just cost too much more to produce. We Yanks are the poorer for that decision. Cheers, Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Monday, February 20, 2017 - 08:54 am:

I thought these were Canadian mufflers!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Monday, February 20, 2017 - 01:22 pm:

Are these for certain years or all Canadian built cars? I am interested because I have a '25 Canadian.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, February 20, 2017 - 01:28 pm:

Alan,
Those look beautiful. How do you form the ends?
I believe for a short time the USA mufflers only partially stamped out the exhaust hole, providing a baffle without using an additional part.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd, ............Red Deer, Alberta on Monday, February 20, 2017 - 03:03 pm:

"I thought these were Canadian mufflers!"

We calls that a scarf.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Monday, February 20, 2017 - 03:13 pm:

I always called it a scarf too but when I looked up mufflers that photo showed up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, February 20, 2017 - 05:42 pm:

David, I bought the remaining stocks of muffler ends from the family of a T model friend who died. He was making them as a service to the members. Along with them, the tooling used in their production was included. They are metal spun around a former, rather than stamped. I have yet to have more made.

A local sheet metal shop makes up the outer and intermediate shells. I have them use heavier sheet, and they are made with the correct crimped join just like flue pipes. For my own use I had some made in stainless steel.

Chad, we have the same cast iron ends used in US production on our earlier cars. These were later. I have no knowledge of design changes during production of the steel ends, so I can offer no definitive answer as to when these were used. Any fossil evidence I have is of the same type.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, February 20, 2017 - 07:48 pm:

I wondered if they were spun, it seemed pretty deep to do a stamping without some expensive machinery. Thanks for responding.
Great that the family didn't just toss the parts and tooling!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Monday, February 20, 2017 - 08:07 pm:

Allan,

They look great! And if the shells are the same as the reproductions offered by Lang's and others for the USA 1909 - 1917 3 bolt muffler end style (see: https://www.modeltford.com/item/4025SE.aspx ) or the one bolt 1917-1920 mufflers (see: https://www.modeltford.com/item/4025S.aspx ), it might help save on the shipping costs from Australia to Canada (and some Canadian cars are in the USA). They would look great on a Canadian car.

Thank you for working to continue to make them available.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Page on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 - 02:53 am:

G'day Allan,
They look fantastic!!!
This is something I have been interested in since I got my first T in 1965. It still had an original muffler. I put together an article for the Model T Times ( Jan. - Feb. 2013.)

I have replicated mine in Stainless Steel.

Best regards, John Page, Australia






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Page on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 - 03:14 am:

Link to a past discussion on the Canadian Mufflers.

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/506218/597129.html?1451009759

Best regards, John Page, Australia.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Doris, Arizona on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 - 03:26 am:

Allan,
Those look superb! You are a true craftsman.

Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 - 10:05 am:

Is it possible to make the U.S. version? I understand the 21-27 Canadian mufflers used a cotterpin up front to hold the forward muffler end. I know nothing about Canadian mufflers, but don't think the front muffler shell would have been made the way you are doing it. I hope I'm wrong. I made 50 U.S. exhaust pipes about a year ago, and they sold quickly. I have no immediate plans to make more.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 - 05:05 pm:

Larry, the front end of the muffler was originally butted up against a split pin through the exhaust pipe. This meant that the pipe had to be of a fixed length so that the rear mounting ended up in the correct place. This also meant that the muffler had to be assembled directly onto the pipe.

In the post by John Page it appears to show the split pin going through the flange on the front muffler end. Fossil evidence suggests that the front end was simply slid up against the split pin.

A US style rear end would need to have the deflector stamped out of the metal spinning. I do not have the tooling for that. You can understand that there is little to no demand for same here.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 10:00 am:

I would like to see the inner pipe for the reproduction mufflers. Is the rear bolt the same as the original?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Page on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 03:52 pm:

I am guessing that Larry is wanting to know is the end of the inner done the way Ford made them.



This how I did mine nearly 30 years ago. I know that the exhaust pipe should be one piece , but this is the best I could do at the time and it has stood the test of time.



Best regards, John Page, Australia.


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