New driveshaft and pinion nut

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: New driveshaft and pinion nut
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Monday, February 20, 2017 - 06:02 pm:

How do you hold the driveshaft while torqueing the pinion nut? I have a new shaft, new pinion gear, new sleeve, new pinion key, new nut, and new u-joint. I understand that it will be necessary to heat the sleeve in order to get it onto the shaft. I don't have to remove an old sleeve from the new shaft. If the sleeve is put on the shaft first, can the rest of the stuff be put on from the front?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Monday, February 20, 2017 - 06:17 pm:

Clamp the square end in a strong bench vise. I can't comment on installing the new sleeve or the rest, I used the Fun Projects pinion bearing setup.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Monday, February 20, 2017 - 06:19 pm:

After you have everything assembled and clamped in a vice use a pipe wrench to hold the drive shaft from turning.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth in Alabama on Monday, February 20, 2017 - 06:20 pm:

I just put a crescent wrench in the vise and put the square part of driveshaft in crescent wrench. Easy peasy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Monday, February 20, 2017 - 06:23 pm:

You have to take the old sleeve off to get the thrust bearing off. READ THE SERVICE MANUAL
Heat the sleeve in a pot of motor oil, on a hot plate.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Monday, February 20, 2017 - 06:31 pm:

I want to hold the drive shaft as close to the pinion as I can to prevent any twist. The vice is just to support the shaft the pipe wrench prevents it from turning. 80-90 foot pounds of torque can get a little hairy when you are trying to support the shaft and turn the torque wrench at the same time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Monday, February 20, 2017 - 06:44 pm:

Make sure you have the sleeve lined up right so the notch is where it needs to be for the woodruff key. I too use the Fun Projects set up because the old system is no fun!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Monday, February 20, 2017 - 07:05 pm:

Tommy, you would be miles ahead to use a Fun Projects kit vs the original stuff. This is one area, like the coil box kit, that it's better to deviate from the Ford parts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, February 20, 2017 - 08:30 pm:

Tommy, before you start assembling, measure both the diameter of your new driveshaft and the ID of the new sleeve (although I'm with Chad on this). Make certain the fit is possible. Also check the length of the shaft, especially where the U joint retaining pin hole is. Many driveshafts are not made to the Ford print. One is correct right now!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andy Loso St Joseph, MN on Monday, February 20, 2017 - 08:31 pm:

I don't heat the sleeve, I use our press and push it on. I do use press fit lube. Get it lined up the first time. The thrust bearing must go on first. The FP pinion kit is easier, but I have the tooling, so I do it the old way or new way depending on what the customer wants.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 - 12:50 am:

Our club has a set of Stevens's rear end service tools that has the pullers and sleeve driver, that what I use.
Me bad, I missed the NEW SHAFT part. :-( I mixed you up with someone else posting about the same end of the driveshaft.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 - 12:51 am:

Where do you get good driveshaft Hyatts, Andy? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andy Loso St Joseph, MN on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 - 08:51 am:

I find them in rear axles I buy and rear down.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 - 11:21 am:

Great Andy, They have just about dried out over here - I can only find good axle Hyatts..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez-Templeton, CA on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 - 12:16 pm:

Tommy If you decide to use the Fun projects thrust bearing (which I recommend) make sure you use the fun projects driveshaft as well. It meets the Ford specs. U-joint pin location and shaft diameter is spot on.

I have an unused and unusable, brand new repop driveshaft in my shop that is undersized with bad pin location, to prove my point.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 - 12:22 pm:

The next owner might have to deal with it. See my ad in the classifieds.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 - 05:58 pm:

If the driveshaft would twist when you tighten the nut, it would also twist when you apply the low gear or the brakes. As long as you have the square end clamped in a vise and your wrench is perpendicular to the drive shaft and the turn of the nut is concentric to the drive shaft you should be OK. I think you would strip the threads before you would twist the driveshaft.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Verne Shirk on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 08:01 am:

I reuse old driveshaft bearing sleeves if they are not worn or cracked. Very few are good enough to use due to one or more of those reasons. I have honed new sleeves with a brake cylinder hone to increase the ID a little. They should be snug on the shaft and I don't heat them to put them on. I put on a little anti-seize so as not to draw a gall. The thrust bearing will need to go on before the sleeve (at least on an original driveshaft they do because the middle part of the driveshaft is a larger OD). If you look at the front of your thrust bearing you may detect wear where the old driveshaft sleeve ran. On the later style (1920?-27) bearings, you can turn them around and use the other (unworn) side of the bearing. You can't do that on the early cup style. The sleeve goes on right behind the pinion. In fact, I let the pinion push the sleeve into place as I tighten the nut down. The key for the pinion keeps the sleeve from turning. The whole driveshaft assembly gets 0.003 to 0.005" end clearance. That is set by the gap between the front driveshaft bushing and the back of the u-joint. I make sure the back of my u-joint is nice and smooth so it doesn't wear out the driveshaft bushing face. The front face of the thrust bearing on the pinion end of the driveshaft butts up against the driveshaft housing. (Make sure it is smooth too.) I am of the opinion that there was originally no gasket between the driveshaft spool and the driveshaft housing. I think it was just metal-to-metal. Installing a gasket there would mean that the front of the ball bearing thrust would be metal-to-gasket...not really a good idea in my opinion.
Driveshaft Assembly Drawing


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Verne Shirk on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 08:14 am:

I see I didn't answer one of your questions about what goes on first. I'm assuming the new driveshafts are made larger in the center section like the originals. That being the case, you will have to put the thrust bearing on first before the sleeve goes on. The hole in the thrust bearing is smaller than the diameter of the center portion of the driveshaft...at least on an original shaft.

Again, something to think about...the pinion, driveshaft sleeve, and thrust bearing are all "set" and do not have any adjustment front-to-back in the assembly of the driveshaft. Basically, the only "adjustment" they had at the factory was to face off the front bronze bushing where the u-joint runs against it.


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