Gas control valve for headlights

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Gas control valve for headlights
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Hahs on Monday, February 20, 2017 - 06:27 pm:

Anyone have experience using one of these with a hidden acetylene tank to run the lights?

http://www.valworx.com/product/high-flow-precision-air-regulator-14-0-10-psi/t10 -precision-air-regulators-18-14-38?gclid=Cj0KEQiA25rFBRC8rfyX1vjeg7YBEiQAFIb3b79 yjihhFxiWsLa73v2Fl4-1ErTPa8EGzPYj4qAPj7QaAsVk8P8HAQ


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Monday, February 20, 2017 - 06:52 pm:

I don't think you need to spend that much . I just crack the tank open a tiny bit then light the lamps and adjust up or down. Make sure the lamp doors are open before you crack open the tank. Just the slightest pressure is needed to light the lamps initially and then you can raise or lower the pressure to get the desired result. The pain is in having to get under the car to open the valve and I don't see how that valve will make that any easier.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Monday, February 20, 2017 - 07:52 pm:

We use a normal acetylene regulator and a torch valve after that to adjust the lights.Bud in Wheeler,Mi.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Monday, February 20, 2017 - 07:56 pm:

I do the same as Val except that I have a Prest - O - Lite tank mounted on the running board. I don't use any regulator just like the original set ups, and it works fine.

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 - 01:21 am:

Greg-
Keith and Val do what I do- Just barely open the valve on the Prest-O-Lite tank.

Your profile say 1923 centerdoor. Hmmm. No acetylene light there...

When I used my hidden MC tank I used this cheap MC regulator.



You could use a Turbotorch type of regulator:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/TurboTorch-Compressed-Acetylene-Gas-Regulator/122202590761?_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIC.MBE%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D41376%26meid%3Db946659c61d54c29aac9639a8b45762e%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D122202615768

The problem with using an MC tank is it will not provide adequate acetylene supply for the lamps to be used continuously. You can only use it for brief demonstration purposes.

I have to put on my safety guy hat here:

"To minimize the withdrawal of liquid solvent, acetylene should be withdrawn from the cylinder at a rate not to exceed one-tenth (1/10) of the capacity of the cylinder per hour during intermittent use. For full withdrawal of the contents of the cylinder on a continuous basis, the flow rate should be no more than one-fifteenth (1/15) of the capacity of the cylinder per hour.

If you don't adhere to withdrawal rates, acetone (contained in the acetylene cylinder to stabilize the acetylene gas) will be drawn off with the gaseous acetylene. This acetone reduction from the cylinder makes the cylinder unstable and poses an explosive hazard. The acetone withdrawn with the acetylene gas passes through the regulator and on through the entire system. If this happens...the acetone deteriorates any rubber or plastic parts of the system. Typically, the regulator will fail and shut down the system before the cylinder becomes unstable."

An MC tank holds 10 cubic feet of acetylene. Standard burners used are 3/4 (that means they burn 3/4 of a cubic foot of acetylene per hour) Since there are two of them, the flow is 1-1/2 cubic feet of gas per hour. So you are already way outside of the safety standard. If you use burners marked 1/2, you can get down to the safe operation range for intermittent use. However, 1/2 cuft burners only give off about 18 candlepower. Whereas 3/4 burners give off about 29 candlepower.

A B tank holds 40 cuft of acetylene. An E tank holds 30 cubic feet. Either of these are ideal for continuous use.

: ^ )

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marty Bufalini - Grosse Pointe, MI on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 - 05:49 pm:

Does anyone use one of the period regulators? The kind that you just open it and it automatically release the correct amount? I've seen them before. Just a round thing with multiple bolts around the perimeter. Apparently you open it and it release the right amount to the headlamps. I'd like to try one -- if I can find it -- but I wonder if they are safe given their age.

I just crack mine open now but I don't like the guess-work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 - 06:58 pm:

I believe you are looking for a 3-psi Prest-O-Lite regulator. The old POL tanks had the tank pressure gauge on the bottom so you knew how much gas you had in the tank. That's why I use the little Uniweld double gauge. All I do is turn the B tank valve on and light the lights.

Ken in Texas



Ken in


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Hahs on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 - 07:12 pm:

I'm putting them on my 1917 that was hot rodded very poorly. Building a new chassis for it as the one it came on was a piece of junk. My 23 is all stock.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 - 07:15 pm:

Marty-

Here is an ad for the Presto-O-Lite Automatic Reducing Valve:



Here is a picture of an original:



They are preset at about 3 lbs pressure and more than 100 years old.

If you use one of these newer types:



1) Make sure the fitting is the right size for the tank you are using.

2) Look at the center of the raised cover and see the marking. I think you want one that is marked 5 lbs. I think I have seen them 10 lbs and 15 lbs.

3) Make sure it has the needle valve for throttling it back and fine tuning the flame.

I had one for my B-tank, but the seal of the fitting at the tank was not good and it leaked, so I took it off. I have more confidence in my opening the valve "just a crack" than the operation of a pressure regulator that is nearly 100 years old.

Your mileage may vary...

If you find one and hook it up, Marty, please give us a report!

: ^ )

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 - 07:17 pm:

When i first just used only a regulator i found i was burning paint and the lamp chimneys turned dull red! Hence the valve in the line?? Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marty Bufalini - Grosse Pointe, MI on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 10:45 pm:

Ken, yes! Keith, that's the one in the first pic! But it sounds like I should just stick to my current method and not bother with one of those. The "newer" ones in the lower picture, are they old, too, or can you still get them new somewhere?"


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