One wheel ready for paint, 4 more to go.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: One wheel ready for paint, 4 more to go.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 - 11:09 pm:

Five wheels de-greased with kerosene, Citistripped and pressure washed twice. This is a newer set with much better wood spokes than my previous set. The Citristrip took off a lot of the paint but there is some paint hanging on and it didn't work as well on the varnish. There is a fair amount of varnish left to sand off. One wheel in the front of the picture is wire wheeled clean with a drill and the spokes are sanded. Total time for wire wheeling with a drill and sanding the spokes for one wheel: 3 hours. I think I am going to try a Corner Cat sander or something to speed things up on the sanding. Otherwise I am in for 12 more hours to get the other 4 wheels in the picture done.

5 wheels for sanding.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 - 11:33 pm:

Here are the freshly blasted and galvanized rims with new tires mounted.

Fresh tires and rims.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 01:46 am:

Which tires are you using?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 02:18 am:

It IS a slow process, but it's a great feeling of accomplishment when you're done!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Sherman Tacoma WA on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 02:23 am:

I would think that metal scrapers, used by wood workers would work on the spokes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 08:04 am:

Best/ easiest/ fastest for spokes is a belt sander belt cut into long strips. About 1" wide. Mounted solidly in a Work Mate if you have one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 10:24 am:

Any opinion on gloss black Valspar all in one paint/primer for wood and metal? This would make it considerably easier to paint this. Practically no taping or masking necessary. One step and your done. Durability as good as Rust oleum or others?

Valspar Gloss Black, scraper and dremel scotch wheel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 11:15 am:

I have had good luck with it. I still use a primer before using it (force of habit, I guess). :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 01:28 pm:

This is what they can look like primed with DP90 and finished with Concept
Primed and bare wheel:


Finished wheel;

These were painted 12 years ago and still look great.
I understand that DP90 isn't the same nowadays though.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould, Folsom, CA on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 03:53 pm:

On the DP 90 issue, some counties in California still sell the old stuff. Placer county is one of these, Sacramento county is not. Living in Folsom makes it easy to go to a DP paint supplier in Placerville. The new stuff is a charcoal gray color, perhaps a blue gray is a better description. Hardly the chassis black I want. The old formulation is much better.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 10:08 pm:

What if anything do you do about rust pits like in the picture? Body filler? Ugh. Here's how mine looks right after spraying with Valspar gloss black. Takes nearly a whole can to cover the wheel with one coat. Imperfections really show.

Rust pits.
Painted gloss black with Valspar.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donald Trumpy on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 11:14 pm:

Ignacio, This is why we use primer. Primer bonds to the metal and fills pits in metal and cracks in the wood spokes. If the pits are too big you can fill them with body filler but it should be done on bare metal before you prime. First coat should be epoxy primer, after that other primers can be used, Pits can be filler with high build primer, sanding between coats until you get a smooth finish. It Just depends how good you want it to look. In the long run it is less expensive to use a spray gun than spray cans and you get a better job. I use a touchup gun for final paint on wheels as it is easier to control the spray in all the tight spots around the spokes and such.
For suppliers I use Eastwood, they are not the cheapest but will ship direct and their products are good. get their cat. on line. There are no shortcuts to restoring assembled spoke wheels. To get the finish you will be proud of take time and patients and a lot of tedious work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 11:33 pm:

I was gonna smart off and say spray it again...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 11:34 pm:

Want it to look good but wow it is a lot of hours to prep these. What is a readily available rattle can epoxy primer? I have Rustoleum automotive primer but if I use that on the wood?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donald Trumpy on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 11:58 pm:

Look at where you are, You have spent the money to blast and galvanize the rims. Your doing a bang up job of stripping and cleaning the wheels. Doesn't it make sense to carry that through to the finishing of the wheels. Go to www.Eastwood.com. They have airasol epoxy primer as well as all the other primers and paints and on line videos on how to use them.

One think I noticed in your pictures. Stuff a little news paper in the axle holes and mask off the threads to keep the primer and paint off. It will save you a lot of time later.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Thursday, February 23, 2017 - 12:09 am:



(Message edited by JP_noonan on February 23, 2017)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Thursday, February 23, 2017 - 12:13 am:

Thanks, I like Eastwood but there is a time issue here. I have only 3 more months that I can take my 13 year old son to school in this. It's going to be his car. I am trying to get this as good, safe, reliable, as I can get in a short period of time. Definitely not trying for a show car yet, certainly not a frame off restore. This will be a driver for sure. Trying to get it completed this week or next. We have nearly everything ready to put a reliable but not perfect drive train back together.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, February 23, 2017 - 01:17 am:

Ignacio, if that's your time period, don't worry about pits and grain, you (or your son) can re-do them later. What DOES worry me is the spokes appear to be "clocked" in the picture you showed. Clocked means the hub is rotated in reference to the rim, so the spokes don't line up across the hub. This is caused by shrunk spokes or ones with rot in the center. Either way it is an unsafe condition. Post a picture looking straight on at the wheel, then we can tell if it's clocked or just two spokes that don't quite line up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Thursday, February 23, 2017 - 01:22 am:

@David, they are good it just looks odd in the picture because of the way it is sitting on the rod.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Thursday, February 23, 2017 - 02:03 am:

If I could source an epoxy primer locally quickly I could do it but having to wait for several days minimum for it to arrive I just don't know.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Mann on Thursday, February 23, 2017 - 02:04 am:

COME ON IGNACIO ... I THINK THEY LOOK GOOD ENOUGH AND MOST IMPORTANT PROTECTED FROM WATER. AS LONG AS THEY ARE SAFE .
BUT WHAT IF YOU HAD THE SPOKES OUT AND HAD TO SEND WHEELS TO GET NEW SPOKES ...

WHATS THE BEST WAY OF DOING ? POWDER COAT ?
ALSO POWDER COAT RIMS ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Thursday, February 23, 2017 - 09:14 am:

@Mike yeah that's why I usually outsource painting. When I do it I am never satisfied and see only the imperfections.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Thursday, February 23, 2017 - 11:41 pm:

So I sanded it with 220 and re-coated it. Looks better. It takes a lot of paint. Two cans for 1 wheel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Mann on Thursday, February 23, 2017 - 11:52 pm:

Ignacio , you might need biger tires ! Lol im sure they look great.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Dix on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 08:15 am:

Just finished six '12 - '13 wheels. Dp90 then Concept. Great fun :^( glad they're done!
I have an old rotisserie motor mounted on a threaded shaft, cones to center the wheel, in pillow blocks, on sawhorses, I use. Figured that I've painted over 30 wheels on it over the years. Amazon has rotisserie motors, figured it was time for a new one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 09:49 am:

One easy way to remove rust and old paint from the metal parts of wheels is to cover the wood with Gorilla tape and blast the metal.

When I made new wheels for my touring I used Rustoleum primer on the spokes. I don't know if that's the best way, but it filled the grain and wasn't terribly difficult sanding.


For the top coats I used Ace appliance epoxy. That was almost five years ago and so far it's fine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 12:21 pm:

Here's the first one. Looks ok with the Valspar, not perfect, not bad.

First wheel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 03:27 pm:

The view from the tedious wire wheel, scraping, and a properly attired refinisher.

Wire wheel.
The view from the scraper.
Properly attired refinisher.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 04:25 pm:

Believe it or not, a year from now you'll look back upon all this work as fun! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 09:13 am:

My local home store had this bounty:

Variety of Rustoleum paint for Model T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 01:15 pm:

Ignacio,

The 6 wheel hub nuts are supposed to be locked in place by peening over the end of the bolt that protrudes through the nut. It doesn't have to be peened much. Just enough to mess up the last thread or two enough to ensure that the nut can't back off, WHICH IT WILL DO. Maybe you used Loctite instead? (which is probably o.k.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen D Heatherly on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 01:29 pm:

Ignacio, maybe it's my eyes but, I believe David Dewey is correct. The spoke on one of your wheels do look "clocked."

Stephen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 01:29 pm:

Ignacio,

I believe David Dewey has a point. See how your spokes do not line up from one side of the wheel to the other? It's as if the hub has been rotated clockwise within the wheel assembly, causing the spokes to skew ahead. This does not make for a strong wheel. Please use great care, especially considering your intended use of the car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 02:31 pm:

I should have shot this before painting, but I think you get the idea.


Whether you peen (mash with a hammer) or stake (use a punch), you want to distort the threads so the nut will stay put. I didn't do a pretty job on this one, but I don't think that nut is going anywhere.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 04:36 pm:

Will carefully re-examine for clocking when I get home from work. Check out this beauty I found doing a cursory tightness check. Totally stripped off on the end.

Stripped hub bolt.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 04:52 pm:

My old set of front wheels had only 2 front bolts in the front wheels, the rest where rear bolts on the front. That can't be good I think. My 'new' set of wheels has all front bolts in the front. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 05:44 pm:

No need to use carriage bolts in the hub, the vendors sell the correct bolts with the correct head shape.

https://www.modeltford.com/item/2825BQS.aspx


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 05:54 pm:

So these pitted dudes are not the right ones? Not complaining exactly but often when I post something to the forum the res$pon$e i$ wrong, replace.* Are front hub bolts and back hub bolts the same size? My front ones the heads are slightly larger than the back ones.

*I am grateful for the advice and help. And down goes Valdes again to start over on the wheel paint job with new correct bolts. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 06:36 pm:

Don't feel bad Ignacio, lots of Ts have had their original bolts replaced with carriage bolts over the years.

IMO, If you have to buy new bolts anyway, you might as well get the correct ones.

The vendors sell them as a set of identical fronts and rears, but when I installed mine it seemed like the fronts could have been a little shorter and still had plenty of length left to peen (BTW, I used loctite on mine instead of peening).

Can one of the experts chime in on whether original Ford hub bolts were a different length front and rear? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 08:25 pm:

The trouble with carriage bolts is they usually come with rolled threads. A 3/8" rolled thread bolt will have a smaller diameter shank which is not a firm fit in the wood spokes. The ones I buy from a wheel builder have cut threads on full diameter bolts.
I believe the rear hub bolts should be longer to accommodate the brake drum. If rear hub bolts are used on front wheels there is the possibility that burring over the threads will stop the nut coming off, but may not stop it coming loose.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 09:19 pm:

Clocked! :-( The others are not clocked that I can see. This clocked wheel does not appear rotted out so I wonder how it happened.

Clocked wheel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 09:26 pm:

Nice paint job, but I wouldn't trust that wheel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 10:01 pm:

My new front wheel bolts, like the one in my picture above, were a bit too long. It was easy enough to cut about a quarter inch off each one before I staked them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 10:58 pm:

You'll have to take off at least the front plate of the hub and inspect the spoke ends. There is a SLIM chance the tapers were miscut, creating the "clocked" look, but I suspect you'll find some problems hiding behind the metal.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Tuesday, February 28, 2017 - 12:17 am:

Important question: Are front and rear wheel hubs interchangeable?

Can I transplant my front wheel hub onto a rear wheel? I have a good extra rear wheel. Are the front and back bolt holes in the same spot? Will it wreck the wheel spokes for me to take both hub sides off on the rear wheel?

Otherwise I am in a bad position and will have to seek a good front wheel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Tuesday, February 28, 2017 - 01:49 am:

Ignatio, they are interchangeable, but they can be a real pain to get out of the wheel. The outside plate comes off first. To get it off, the hub outside must be stripped of all paint/rust. When you remove the six bolts, the plate can be driven around a little. Then you can use a drift through the hole in the back of the hub to drive the plate off. On a good wheel the hub should still be firm in the wheel and it is best to press it out. If it comes out easily, I would be looking to see why.

Putting in the replacement hub is just the reverse.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Tuesday, February 28, 2017 - 03:07 am:

As for the hub bolts, aren't the correct bolts from the vendors made from a better steel than the original and the modern grade two carriage bolts? Seems like i read that somewhere. Whatever you do to keep the nuts from coming loose, DON"T tack weld them, which I have seen recommended. They need to be able to be retightened if necessary. Loctite is probably OK, as long as it is the blue "removable" type, the red "stud and bearing mount" stuff will have to be heated to be able to move the nuts. Personally, I prefer to pein the nuts as opposed to staking them, makes it easier to retighten them if needed. They don't need to be beat down like a rivet, just enough to upset the threads a bit. JMHO Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Tuesday, February 28, 2017 - 03:11 am:

Jerry V. and David D., good call on those spokes, I didn't catch that. Something ain't right! :-( Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, February 28, 2017 - 09:01 am:

"Important question: Are front and rear wheel hubs interchangeable?"

If the question means using front hubs in back and vice versa, the answer is no. They're completely different.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, February 28, 2017 - 11:10 am:

Steve,

I think he means are front & rear hubs interchangeable within a given wheel. That would be a yes. Obviously, doing so would make a front wheel into a rear wheel, or visa versa.

Your point is well taken however.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Tuesday, February 28, 2017 - 07:14 pm:

Full stop on painting the wheels until I get a new set of correct hub bolts and a new front wheel. Without a wheel press doing a hub transplant sounds like a recipe for destroying an ok wheel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, February 28, 2017 - 11:58 pm:

Hmm, front hub plate is not that hard to remove, then you can tell what is causing the problem. I don't know how hard it is for you to find a good "new" wheel, but being metal felloe, it isn't that difficult to buy new spokes and install them, voila! New wheel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 - 01:16 am:

@David, I don't have a wheel press right now to install new spokes. Having never done that I assume you need a wheel press to put new spokes in?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 - 01:50 am:

Ignacio, a wheel press isn't hard to build.John Regan has some plans for one, many on here have built them. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 - 03:41 am:

Yes, you do need a wheel press, but as David S. mentions John Regan has a simple plan to build one out of common lumber and all-thread. It does take some patience though!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 - 06:06 am:

Yes it does take patience!These are my wheels when I started! haha


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 - 09:49 am:

Be sure you read the notes with the video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UKZ7WrfHdf8&t=18s





Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 12:09 am:

Look what I built today :-) I think I am turning into Steve Jelf.

Regan spoke press by Valdes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 12:49 am:

Now you are talking- his video is a life saver !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 10:07 am:

Yes it looks like they rolled. Maybe they were not the right size to begin with, too short?

Rolled wheel spokes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 10:19 am:

Possibly. Maybe a previous owner used standard Ford length spokes when the felloes required the 1/32 inch longer Hayes / Kelsey length spokes.

My idle speculation is that it started life as a rear wheel, then when it twisted from the torque, a previous owner switched hubs and moved the wheel to the front.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 10:24 am:

Gentlemen, this 30 x 3.5 demountable wheel inner diameter is 20.75 inches (see picture). It is a notched wheel (see picture) indicating Hayes but according to Lang's website a Ford wheel is 20.75 and a K-H is 20 13/16. The spoke size as found in this wheel is 9.75.

Which spoke does this wheel take a K-H like this one https://www.modeltford.com/item/2800HS-HY.aspx or a Ford?

20.75 inch wheel measurement.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 10:40 am:

It doesn't matter what the manufacturer is. If you've got the 20.75" rims, buy the spokes made for them. Also, be sure to measure the diameter of the hole that the spoke end fits into. Lang's sells the spokes meant to fit in 1/2" holes, however, some are 5/8". Measure the holes in your felloes to be sure.

Also, when you drill the 6 hub bolt holes, be certain to drill them on the seam between two spokes, like your original wheels are. Also, use a drill size that will give a snug fit with the hub bolts. You should have to tap them in with a mallet, (ideally).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 12:24 pm:

If you're using the tab end of the tape measure at the other end, you are not getting an accurate measurement. Start from the 1" mark, and check it again, I'll bet you come up with a different number.
Glad you decided to look into that wheel! Looks like you're on your way. BTW, I think you can get the spokes a little less expensive straight from Stutzman's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 12:48 pm:

My spokes from Stutzman were about half the price of the ones from the parts dealers. But I've heard that he doesn't sell separate spokes anymore. If that's the case, I'd check with some of the other wheelwrights before paying full retail.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 12:59 pm:

IMO, you have Hayes felloes and the spoke you identified in your link is the correct one <if> your felloes have holes for 1/2 inch tenons. Please measure the tenon holes in your felloes to make sure!

I bought those same spokes and used them to build up a set of wheels with Kelsey felloes, they turned out great.

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/411944/454203.html?1404960383


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 06:18 pm:

Felloe holes are 0.5 inch. I re-measured at the inch mark of my tape measureand the diameter seems to be 20 13/16. So it would appear that this spoke is the correct one?

https://www.modeltford.com/item/2800HS-HY.aspx


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 06:39 pm:

Yes! :-)

If you're going to do all four wheels, you will need at least 48 spokes (12 x 4). I bought 50 so that I had 2 spares in case I messed one up during pressing (I didn't need to use the spares).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 08:27 pm:

Transplanted! I used the Regan press to hold it and advanced the nut little by little while bopping each spoke and its brother round and round with a rubber mallet until the back wheel hub came out. Then I put a front hub in until the bolts threaded and here is the result. Correct bolts BTW.

Transplanted front hub on what was a rear wheel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Friday, March 03, 2017 - 08:00 pm:

Looking good!
Nice and snug stuffing it all back together?
:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Thursday, March 09, 2017 - 10:14 pm:

We have wheels.

Wheel.
Wheels.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 01:10 am:

Ignacio-
They not only look beautiful, but safe too!
What brand of tires are they?
: ^ )
-Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Troy Todd on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 01:15 am:

When we did my wheels we ended up using a sandblaster with walnut shells. It was taking forever to hand sand them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 01:22 am:

Fresh tires & rims, new paint, solid wheels: very pretty.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 09:07 am:

Well done, Ignacio! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 10:49 am:

Thanks all, made it to this finish line a few remain. Keith these are Wards.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond-Forest, Va on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 01:36 pm:

CONGRATS!!!


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