Speedo cable 1911

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Speedo cable 1911
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By stuart clipson on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 08:26 am:

i could use some help in determining and finding the correct speedometer cable assembly for my early 1911 touring. is the cable housing steel or brass? are the wound housing coils wide or narrow like the repro brass ones? are both nuts on the ends knurrled or one hex and one knurrled? any and all help is appreciated. cheers stu


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Layden Butler on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 12:41 pm:

Aren't the new repro cable housings made from horn tubing? That would be why they are so limp.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 12:48 pm:

The housing is heavy steel inside a brass sleeve. Both's ends are knurled, brass, and identical.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Colin Mavins Winnipeg,Canada on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 12:53 pm:

Our car is a late 12 stewart cable steel case Knurled on the speedometer end Hex on the swivel end we also have 2 spares they are the same as what is on the car. 1911 may be different, the early cars some have a brass case. Cheers Colin


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By stuart clipson on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 02:35 pm:

hi royce

pardon my novice knowledge of subject.....i'm confused as to whether your referring to the housing of heavy steel as the steel link cable and the sheath is brass into which it turns? if anyone has a detailed pic it would help me with the nomenclature. thanks and cheers, stu


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 08:22 pm:

I am not talking about the inner links at all.

The cable housing has a heavy inner flexible steel sheath covered by a brass outer sheath. The steel links run inside the inner steel sheath. Sorry I am on the road until Saturday no pictures until I get back home.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By stuart clipson on Thursday, February 23, 2017 - 07:04 am:

thank you royce

i appreciate the clarification. i had no idea.
sounds like an impossible task to find an original assembly or parts to make up one. i look forward to see your pics.

cheers
stu


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By stuart clipson on Thursday, February 23, 2017 - 02:10 pm:

layden.....comcast has message blocked as spam cannot send
send me a pm thanks stuclipson1@fuse.nospacenet

leave out nospace

thanks
stu


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Thursday, February 23, 2017 - 04:41 pm:

What is the length, i have a few lying in the rafters i need to identify .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By stuart clipson on Thursday, February 23, 2017 - 06:10 pm:

i believe the 1911 cable is to be 48"

cheers
stu


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael L on Thursday, February 23, 2017 - 07:38 pm:

Anybody have a 60" and plus brass cable?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard E Moore Jr. Pickwick lake Tenn. on Thursday, February 23, 2017 - 08:47 pm:

Mines brass.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 09:03 am:

This is an original 1909 - 1912 cable housing as described above on my '10.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By stuart clipson on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 03:23 pm:

royce...

are you running a brass gear on the swivel unit?
if so, is a little noisy?

cheers
stu


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 03:35 pm:

Stuart,

The wheel gear from 1909 - 1911 was brass plated steel engraved with Stewart part number 22. The gear on the swivel is brass, engraved with Stewart part number 1. It does not make any noise that can be heard above the engine.

The swivel in my photo was only used in 1911, it is 2 1/2 to 1 ratio with a cast iron body.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 03:44 pm:

Royce-

That forged steel swivel was introduced very, very late 1911, and used on 1912 and 1913 cars.

It might be marked A-12 and B-12 or A-13 and B-13, or might have no markings at all.

-Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 03:56 pm:

Keith,

What would have been used prior to the iron or steel swivel? I did not think there was any earlier 2 1/2 to 1 swivel? All the 1911 speedometers require 2 1/2 to 1 ratio.

There are no markings on it that I could find.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Layden Butler on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 04:08 pm:

a


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 06:27 pm:

OK so I have the correct one for 1910, and the one currently on the car is correct for 1912. Good thing I don't need the 1911 version!

Thanks Layden.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 11:04 pm:

Royce,

Like the print that Layden posted says, and according to Russ Furstnow's Speedometer book, there were two different Stewart Warner swivels used in 1911.

The first one introduced a grease cup on the top side of the input shaft side of the housing. The second had the grease cup on the end (in line with the input shaft) of the housing.

In an article Russ wrote for the Model T Times in 2011, Russ identifies actually four types of swivels.

Type #1 has the grease cup on the top side of the housing at the end of the intermediate shaft.
Type #2 has the grease cup on the top end of the housing near the end of the input shaft.
Type #3 has the grease cup on the side of the housing at the end of the input shaft opposite of the pinion gear.
Type #4 looks the same as #3, but the steel sleeves that they had run the shafts through was eliminated. All the 1911 Swivels used the threaded nut to hold the pinion gear on.

Type 4 is very similar to the swivel that was used from 1914 on.

All of the earliest 1911 swivels that had the steel sleeves were very brittle and often failed.

The forged steel swivel was by far the best, but was also expensive to make. In 1914 they re-introduced the all-pot metal (no steel sleeve) design (last of the 1911 type.)

The 1910 swivel had NO grease up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 09:06 am:

Yes, correct, my 1910 1:1 swivel has a place to insert a pin style grease gun.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 10:44 am:

Your car should have knurled nuts on both ends.


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