Old Photo - Deep In The Forest

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Old Photo - Deep In The Forest
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 10:57 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 11:28 am:

Whats that noise? Sounds like wood cracking. And where is that tall tree I saw earlier?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 11:45 am:

What a great bridge !! It helps to remember a Model T weighs about the same as a good-size saddle horse.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 11:48 am:

McReady springs? Anybody know where that is ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Layden Butler on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 12:00 pm:

McCready Springs ( spelling) is here:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/osucommons/7263075466


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lonnie Doan S. E. Illinois on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 12:09 pm:

Check this out.Road to McCready Springs.Gerald W. Williams collection. https://oregondigital.org/sets/gwilliams/oregondigital:df66vd23v


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 12:15 pm:

By its bark, I think that's a Ponderosa Pine. The picture makes it look like it's over the bridge, but it is probably a ways to one side.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 12:15 pm:

Thanks guys. That is the same car and that is an acetylene headlight mounted in front of the radiator.
"Veerry Interesting"
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil McKay on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 01:17 pm:

No, not Ponderosa pine. Probably Douglas fir. Location is in Lane County, Oregon some miles east of the town of Oakridge.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 01:47 pm:

I was thinking the type of tree might hint at the location, but now that the location is known, it hints at the type of tree! I think Neil is probably correct.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 03:17 pm:

It was probably not that unusual to add an acetylene headlight on a magneto headlight car.

At least the gas light was steady and dependable.

Ken in Texas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Layden Butler on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 03:21 pm:

Ken,
Not just steady and dependable, they can be darn bright. I have had oncoming cars flick their high beams at me thinking I had my high beams on.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 07:15 pm:

The bark doesn't look like the Ponderosa Pines in my yard. But the SIZE sure does! I think it may be a Douglas Fir, or a close relative. Their bark is similar to the tree in the photo, and I have seen them that large also. There are hundreds of varieties of pine and fir trees. Most are indigenous to fairly small areas (like one medium size state, or less than half of Califunny). We are only a bit under 100 miles from the area of Lake Tahoe that was the setting for the "Bonanza" TV series, and home to the Ponderosa Ranch, and the trees for which it was named.
I am not an expert on trees, but I love and appreciate trees, and picked up a little information over the years. One thing I notice about the fallen tree in the photo, is that the trunk is very long and straight (much like a Ponderosa Pine). I am not sure what is typical for a Douglas fir, but several I have known were more tapered going up the trunk. Like a giant Sequoia Redwood as opposed to a California Redwood (and you thought all Redwoods were one and the same!).
If someone that knows trees better than I do can identify the one in the photo, I would be curious to hear about it.
I met such a person years ago. I was restoring a 1925 Studebaker I had at the time. I needed to replace one of the running boards (made of wood) that was broken. Long before internet research, I located an exotic woods supplier not far from where I lived, and took samples of the broken running board with me. The fellow looked at my samples, eyes wide, said "Where did you get this?!" He starts rattling off what it was (some kind of fir) and reciting the history, where it grew naturally, its history as a marketable material, and the one place in the world where a small amount might be available from (about 100 acres someplace near the Mississippi River). I politely repeated that I did not need an EXACT replacement, just something close. He was very nice. Told me the closest thing currently available was in fact Douglas Fir. He spent several minutes telling me the best local lumber yard to go to, and how to check over the grain to find the best piece for what I wanted. The fellow spent about half an hour with me, for no sale. But that guy knew his trees and wood! To this day, I thank him for sharing his knowledge the way he did, even though I never saw him again. Sort of like this forum.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, w2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Sullivan on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 10:20 pm:

Looks like Doug fir, pretty common in my 20. Dave in Bellingham,WA


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 11:02 pm:

Definitely Doug Fir, Psudotsuga Menezesii

I *think* I spelled that right.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 12:25 am:

Very good, Burger.

You get an A.

Now, how about the Scientific name for the Dawn Redwood?

: ^ )


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil McKay on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 12:47 am:

Menziesii...only two e's


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 02:31 pm:

Dawn Redwood is not a native tree, so no clue ....

Mr. Google says: "Metasequoia glyptostroboides"

Off the top of my head, Thuja Plicata (Western Red Cedar), Sequoia
Giganteum (Coast Redwood), Abies Grandis (Grand Fir), Abies Concolor
(White Fir) .... Western Hemlock is right on the tip of my tongue !

Not bad for 40+ years since last using these terms !

Now, for the bonus question and the win, without looking, which street
divides upper from lower Pispicattiquawttimauken ? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 02:38 pm:

And my favorite of all, Pinus Ponderosa !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 02:46 pm:

I thought by now that someone would mention that while you can tell a tree from its bark, does it bite?
DD (quickly ducking)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 02:49 pm:

I dont see apples so Im pretty sure its not an apple tree. Pears are out to.??????????


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 03:06 pm:

Burger, your picture finally dropped in (dial-up) I should take a picture of the one right next to my house and post it. We have a few on the mountain here. (Dewey Mountain, I call this place!)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 05:01 pm:

Thank you Mr B, and all!
Neat stuff.


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