Steam whistles - would they work as an exhaust whistle?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Steam whistles - would they work as an exhaust whistle?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Dunlap - Orlando, Florida on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 10:23 pm:

I love my Aermore exhaust whistle, but I've been giving some thought to getting a steam whistle for one of my other Model Ts. Would a steam whistle hooked up with a cutout to a Model T exhaust produce any sound? Would it produce a sound comparable to the exhaust whistle? Has anyone tried this?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Doris, Arizona on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 10:35 pm:

Steam whistles are typically designed to operate at higher pressures and temperatures. Would think the gas density would be different as well. Don't know of anyone who has tried it though.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chadwick Azevedo on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 10:44 pm:

Im going to say "yes" think of blowing across a bottle top. A little or a lot of air will produce sound. I believe it has more to do with the direction of the air as to whether or not there will be sound and the volume is related to the amount of air. Now I may be totally wrong or totally right, either way Ill sit back and sip on another beer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 10:56 pm:

I have both. The steam whistle requires an air release much stronger
than what a T engine puts out to give you that familiar "steam whistle"
sound. It WILL make some noise, but you probably won't be happy
with the results. I have plans to run a compressor and air tank on The
Beast with an Aermore, set up like a steam whistle. In bench tests, it
sounds very much like the classic steam locomotive whistle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willis Jenkins on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 11:03 pm:

To each their own but, I have never liked the exhaust whistles and have found them quite annoying at the OCF! I cannot understand why someone would want to put one on their car? A horn works just fine and does not sound goofy like it's out of a cartoon. That's just me, though.

Willis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 11:13 pm:

I do not care for the pulsing of the whistles when the air used is
from the exhaust. When activated by a strong, steady air force, they
sound pretty good.

My original interest was in having a more attention-getting emergency
sounder, in the event of lost brakes or similar. The little buzzer horn
will not alert the average dolt on the streets these days of a problem.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Doris, Arizona on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 11:14 pm:

Found this on YouTube. 1926 TT Truck with steam whistle. As Burger mentioned, it does make noise.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=167FdZwCsJc


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 11:20 pm:

If you think about it a steam engine is going to have maybe 125LBS+ of continuous pressure coming from the boiler unlike say even an air compresses that is cycling on and off and has a rather slow refill in comparison.
There is no way to expect to get that much from the exhaust system of a Model T.
That being said, maybe one of the smaller whistles might work.

I had a steam whistle, maybe 3-4 inch in diameter, about 10 inches tall, three chamber, hooked up the a 20 gal compressor tank, got some sound but sure emptied the tank fast.

Burger makes a good point about using an air tank for even an Aermore whistle, makes a better sound. I have heard better sounds coming out of mine when blowing thru it myself then it makes being on the car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 11:21 pm:

That video shows how "sick" the whistle sounds with just exhaust
powering it. With a pressurized air tank providing a stronger source
that is not pulsating, it would be twice that volume and have a much
more intense clarity of sound.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 11:22 pm:

Some of us like them and they are era correct! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 11:28 pm:

My Aeromore like probably all others does practically nothing at idle and low speeds. It really needs a good head of steam behind it to make it sound like it should. :-)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HzB3aAmj2v0&feature=youtu.be


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 11:34 pm:

To clarify Mark's point, a steam whistle will consume large amounts
of air to really "holler" like it should. Hard to build and carry that kind
of air force with a T. I have an advantage, having a TT, to carry an air
tank where I can build up a higher pressure and volume.
I acquired 3 different Aermores from a guy at a scrap yard and bench
tested each for sound at 100lbs., selecting that one I liked the tone of
the most. The Aermores use FAR less air to get a LOT more sound, so
it is a good match of potential limitations of the T and getting maximum
sound, should that moment come that you never want to happen.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 11:39 pm:

Stanleys come with steam whistles. Below about 250 psi, they sound anemic. At normal operating pressure of 350-550 psi, they sound just like a train approaching a grade crossing - magnificent!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, February 24, 2017 - 11:58 pm:

Perzackly !

Steam whistles. Helping people need to change their shorts for 150 years ! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 01:54 am:

A steam whistle requires a LOT of air volume, and a fair amount of Steam volume--the steam expands a lot a it escapes the confinements of a boiler, so the whistle has a lot more volume with the same pressure of air. An Aermore whistle is designed for some volume, but low pressure. Aermores come in various sizes, and the smallest one is the one to use for a T.
I put an Aermore on my Steamboat years ago. I use a 1/4" whistle valve, then belled up to a 1" pipe about 6" long and then the whistle. This allowed the steam to expand and lose pressure so it wouldn't over-blow the whistle--it wuz purty sounding!
Put one on the T railcar at Portola, and was very disappointed in the results--needed a smaller one, as the railcar NEEDED a loud horn/whistle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 06:39 am:

Thanks David. You are right on track. The problem with operating a steam whistle on air is that steam expands many many more times its original volume than compressed air. Steam whistles will make noise on air, but don't sound like steam whistles. Steam engines can move on air, but not with nearly the torque of one running on steam.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 02:32 pm:

Realy depends on the whistle and how the air is allowed to pass through it


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 02:42 pm:

I put a 1950's 6v car horn on my A Roadster,for emergencies,because modern peoole do not recognize AAAOOOOGAAA as an emergency sound any more than WOOOOO....WOOOOO...My 40 Horse Case could really belt out the whistle.But no one would come running to see whar was the matter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By george house . . .caldwell county, TX on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 02:52 pm:

I also don't believe we'd be satisfied with a steam whistle on a T but I do enjoy my brass steam whistle on my large air compressor maintaining 125 PSI.
That said, I've done almost the opposite of your suggestion: I've attached an Aeromore whistle to the exhaust of a 4 HP Hercules hit & miss stationary engine. Marvelous intermittent BLASTS of harmonious loudness....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 06:36 pm:

If you want to make noise in case of emergency, why not run a 6v siren under the hood with a doorbell type button somewhere within reach.

I've got one on my WWII jeep, hidden out of sight and it's a real attention getter. Everyone thinks Patton is coming!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 02:43 am:

Back when I was commuting up the Feather River canyon every week to work in Portola I added a set of air horns to my little 71 Datsun pickup--and once in a while it did it's job, which more than once was to scare the ##@$#! out of a #$#@@! deer. was a little kit that included an "instant on" air compressor.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 09:04 am:

The video posted by Bob Doris is an Aermore working the way they always do. Not a train whistle at all.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By george house . . .caldwell county, TX on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 09:32 am:

I just watched the video Royce referenced. Although Bob's enclosed cab TT is probably one of the most gorgeous TT restorations I've ever seen, it leaves me with a question:
The 3 'stakes' comprising the 'tailgate'; weren't they supposed to be made of wood ? 2 X 4s ? The terribly difficult to find metal stakes don't fit in the 3 rear pockets. What say you ?


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