Sold my Model T - no sellers remorse

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Sold my Model T - no sellers remorse
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RalphS in NE Oregon on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 03:01 pm:

A few years ago I bought a wrecked 23 roadster in Washington which had been rear ended by an inattentive driver on the freeway. I did enough work to get it back on the road; replaced the bent rear end, broken wheels, popped tires, straightened the rear fender enough to drive it, etc. Had fun driving it around but since it had a standard rear end and I live at the top of a long hill I could sure see the advantage of having a Ruckstell.
So when a high radiator, Ruckstell equipped 23 roadster came available locally at a reasonable price, I jumped at the chance to buy it. Have been driving it a lot and the old roadster sat unused. Last summer, while getting my sheep sheared, my shearer commented that he had been wanting a T, but had always missed out on them when one become available at a good price. Have I got a deal for you I told him and ended up selling him the old T a short while later. He had never driven one before so I gave him driving instructions on the taxiway of a lightly used local airport. Pretty soon he was giving his two adult sons driving lessons and giving his grandkids rides as well. I have had numerous reports of my old T being spotted at various locations in the county. This winter he is getting the body work done that I had not gotten around to. And now I have someone else to drive T's with.
So I am really happy to see the car being used again. No sellers remorse from me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 03:06 pm:

Thats a sneeky way to infect new people to this affliction. Great to hear you found it a great home and kept it on the road.
Drive safe and often


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 04:23 pm:

No such thing as a high radiator '23.

If your Ford was manufactured in 1923 but has the high radiator, hood and cowl, then it's a 1924 Ford.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 09:35 pm:

Ford changed the car in the fall, but some of the last years models were sold the following year and some of the next years models were sold in the fall. Depending on the particular state or country's method of registering the vehicle, it could be either last years model or the following years model. In some places cars were titled according to the year first sold. So it could be a change made for year 24 which was sold in 23. I have a car like that. Mine is a straight windshield registered as a 22, but I have seen several slant windshield cars also registered 22.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Derocher on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 09:58 pm:

Not true, have one locally that is a high hood but is titled a 1923 touring here in northern Michigan. Very common cause of each county doing titles by date not model year. JD


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 10:03 pm:

Disirregardlessly of high hood and year, this man is poisoning the minds
of others with his evil work. Just watch, this new owner will only infect
MORE innocents with this black car scourge !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 10:09 pm:

Titles and registrations do not determine the model year of a car. The model year is determined by the manufacturer, not the government.

If the model year is misstated on the title or registration, that doesn't magically make the car that model year.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Derocher on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 10:28 pm:

So if it is purchased and titled as a 1923 does that make it wrong to display the 1923 plate that the state of Michigan licensed it as??? I would guess that there are lots of cars that fall into this category, every year, based on state regulations, I see your point, but in a model year with few changes no one would probably notice, high hood to a low hood model, I guess so. JD


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 11:39 pm:

"Wrong" ???

Like "Sick and wrong" ?

It's an outrage !

It's a crime !

Just drive the #@! thing and to hell with anyone who might tell you
it is "wrong". :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison - Rice, Minnesota on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 12:35 am:

I'd be willing to bet the majority of the people that see my Model T's wouldn't have any idea what year they were made, would probably call it a Model A, and might ask me what kind of model A it is. I had a kid ask me if my Touring car used steam. I figure the only people who really care enough to worry about whether it's correct to any specific year are the owners of Model T Fords.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 12:37 am:

There is a lot of information readily available on Model T Fords. Most of the research and homework has already been done for us.

If you own a Model T Ford, in my opinion you should at least possess some basic knowledge of what you actually own. That only takes about ten to twenty minutes worth of reading for a given model year.

Then, for example, with a little knowledge a person can simply say "I own a 1923 Ford" instead of saying "I own a low-radiator 1923 Ford" which is redundant because all 1923 Fords have low radiators.

Similarly, a person can simply say "I own a 1924 Ford" instead of saying "I own a high-radiator 1923 Ford," which doesn't make sense because 1923 Fords did not have high radiators.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 02:06 am:

My Model T touring car was assembled in Dec, 1915. This makes it a "pre-16 car, elegible for HCCA tours, etc. BUT, it IS a 1916 Touring car, according to the Ford Motor Company. If I get YOM plates, they will be 1915 plates, as that's the year first sold. California titles used to have (may still have, I don't know)that listed both year model and year first sold.
I have no problem telling folks that I have a 1916 T built in 1915.
As we are keeping a piece of history alive, I DO think it is important to not perpetuate misinformation that was once accepted as "Truth." This would include calling a 1923 built 1924 year model a "high hood '23" or claiming there is a "Commercial" front fender! As time goes on, fewer and fewer folks will know the truth about our cars if we don't pass it along.
But then, I used to be a curator, and you know how curators are!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 02:44 am:

When I was stationed in Mississippi I bought a new '72 car, when I got my tags and title the lady said that all pre '72 transactions were bill-of-sale only. I soon after bought an old GMC pickup truck, the guy wrote out a bill of sale and signed it on a piece of brown paper bag. I went up and saw the lady again, she took my brown paper bill-of-sale and the state gave me the first title for this '54 GMC. Back in pre-database days the vehicles were bought and sold by whatever the buyer, seller and county clerks agreed on. LOL


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 08:04 am:

Ralph,

Great thread ...... :-)


Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 11:31 am:

Ralph, great thread
One T on the road is worth many unfinished projects.
I have a 16 with many improper parts done mostly for safety and personal comfort. Bet it will receive as much attention as a pristine T when its on the road.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 11:43 am:

In the 15 T's I have owned in the last 25 years I have owned both a low and high radiator 23 T's.
Most interesting was the low rad 23 had the late winshield and top and turtle deck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 12:12 pm:

Again - no such thing as a high radiator 1923 Ford. No reason to say low radiator 1923 Ford as that is redundant.

Bob - 1923 Model T Ford roadsters have a low radiator, slant windshield, one man top and revised turtle deck. So, there was nothing odd about that particular 1923 Ford the you owned.

It is very simple and logical:

1922 model
all body styles:
- low radiator, hood and cowl
touring and roadster:
- straight up and down, folding windshield
- two-man top

1923 model
all body styles:
- low radiator, hood and cowl
touring and roadster:
- slant windshield
- one-man top
roadster:
- completely revised trunk design

1924 model
all body styles:
high radiator, hood and cowl
touring and roadster:
- slant windshield
- one-man top
roadster:
- trunk same as 1923

Black radiator tourings and roadsters for the casual observer:

1917 through 1922: basically the same
1923: unique
1924 and 1925: basically the same


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RalphS in NE Oregon on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 01:34 pm:

Gee, I really didn't mean to reopen the great debate with my high radiator comment; I wanted it to be about not having sellers remorse.
But here's what my research indicates about the radiator issue (took more than 20 minutes). From Bruce McC's book, page 308: 1923 model year ran from September 1922 to July 1923. The front section of the car was revised in mid year, with a new and higher radiator. These cars were generally referred to as "1924" models in Ford Literature, although some were built in fiscal 1923 (before August). (Note that it doesn't say ALWAYS) Page 309: Windshield (for 1923). Unchanged when the "1924" style appeared in June. (Note that June is clearly in the 1923 model year)
Page 330: In June 1923 the entire Ford line was restyled somewhat and this new series was referred to as the "1924 models" in the Ford parts list. (I think this may not be accurate information for the following reasons)
Go to the August 1923 Ford parts list. It lists the low radiator as 3925B fitting 1917-23. Now go to the November 1923 parts list and it lists the 3925B radiator fitting the 1917-23 models and the 3925D (high)radiator fitting the 1923 models. Now go to the March 1924 parts list and you find the 3925B radiator fitting 1917-23 and the 3929D fitting the 1923-24 models.
Seems pretty clear from all this that back in the day you could have purchased a 1923 high radiator from Ford, and that there were definitely high radiator cars built at the end of the 1923 model year, in June.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Michael Rogers on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 06:13 pm:

So, does this thread mean that there are no 1916 black cars and all 1916 cars are brass? I take it to mean that if it is in print it has to be true.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 - 05:03 pm:

Some Ts MADE in 1916 had black radiators and rounded hoods, BUT they are 1817 YEAR MODEL cars.
Ain't life confusin'? Even today you can buy a 2018 car in 2017 (well, you can in a few more months).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Kiefer - Adams, MN on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 - 05:43 pm:

Getting a little off topic here, I was at a new auto show in Orlando FL in the fall of 1995. there was a new 1997 Ford F150 there. I new Ford was coming out with this in the future so I asked the sales person there how much this pickup was going to change before 1997 rolled around? I was thinking this was a prototype. He said this is it. He said it will be on the market January 3rd of 1996 and it was.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 - 09:09 pm:

"1817 Model cars"? Yes David, life is very confusing. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, March 08, 2017 - 03:33 am:

Ah yes, my dyslexia shows up at odd moments!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Suratt on Sunday, March 12, 2017 - 11:52 am:

Wow. I just joined this group to get some advice to help with my '26 Runabout. It seems to have some members that would rather be right than polite. If this is the norm here, I think I'll pass.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Lebeda, Humboldt, SD on Sunday, March 12, 2017 - 12:03 pm:

John: This is not the NORM; just sometimes. With text/print it is hard to tell if is just gentle ribbing?? Hang in there! This is a great web site,
Chuck


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Jull in Oakland on Sunday, March 12, 2017 - 01:37 pm:

I see nothing wrong with one identifying their car as a 23 high cowl. Yes, I believe that that is actually a 24 model as far as Ford was concerned. However, if you call it a 24 then you could also state it was built in 23. So what's easier to say: " a 23 high cowl" or "a 24 made in 23". Either way you are clarifying something. So as far as I am concerned everyone is correct. Yes, it is good that people are informed about when models changed but does it really need to turn into an "I am right and you are wrong" discussion all the time?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, March 13, 2017 - 02:34 am:

What was it the Buffalo Springfield said?
"Nobody's right if everybody's wrong"?

And some of you think I only like old country/Western and opera, or theater organ with silent movies.

Don't give up on us John Suratt. There are a few of us that can get worked up about some of the lesser important details. On the other hand. Sorting out some of the important details has been difficult because of a half century of misinformation. And a lot of it IS good-natured ribbing within long running disputes. The keyboard does not always convey the sentiment. :-)
How about some pictures of your car? A few details? How long you have had it?
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Aldrich Orting Wa on Monday, March 13, 2017 - 12:16 pm:

I have a titled 1923 Runabout with a high radiator. In truth it is a "parts car" but the engine serial number etc make it a 1923. (titling it that way didn't hurt either).


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