Installed Bendix cover oiler

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Installed Bendix cover oiler
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 03:15 pm:

Thought I would show how I installed a bendix cover accessory oiler. This does require permanent (well almost) alteration to parts. If that doesn't interest you, then this isn't for you. I really didn't want to hack a giant hole in the hogs head with the Texas T-Parts kit...not to mention it is a little pricey. I figured I had minimal cost in this to give it a shot, plus it has been done before with success. This does require welding or brazing.

My total investment, $10, But I had the two brass fittings given to me. Depending on your location, it would probably cost $25-30 total. The fittings and hose can be had at a better Napa or diesel truck parts stores.



I started with a couple 1/2" NPT x 3/8" NPT reducers in steel. I cut the outside threaded portion length in half.

Using a 3/4" hole saw, I made a hole in the oil pan, just in front of the first rod. If you look right above that, there are two oil pan bolts, I made sure I was between them. I then used a 1/2" NPT tap to tap the pan. You might be able to get away from using the tap by slightly grinding the hole a little bit bigger. I then threaded the fitting in until it was approximately flush on the inside.





I then welded the fitting to the pan to give the area strength and be leak free. I used a MIG, this could be brazed in also. Here it is after a quick coat of paint. I also tapped the 3/8" NPT threads a little deeper to get the brass fitting in farther.





Next I did the same thing to the bendix cover. Welded in the shortened fitting. I will note that I offset the fitting to the right side (passenger side) of the engine so as to still allow screwdriver clearance for the bottom cover screw. This offset also allows the 90 degree fitting to point slightly downward. Again, I tapped the 3/8" NPT threads a little deeper to get the brass fitting in farther. Also as a note, if any of the fitting or weld protrude into the inside of the cover, grind it flush with the inside. I used a carbide burr on a die grinder. A little teflon tape on it (do not get above the threads so none will break off and clog the line) and screw the fitting in. Make sure to point it towards the left front wheel, the hose will need to clear the pan support arm.







Install the front pan fitting, pointing upward slightly.





The last part is to install the 1/2" hose. This is plastic hose often called "synflex" in the trucking industry (can you tell the business I work in? LOL). It is used a lot in the trucking industry for fuel and air lines. It is flexible and inexpensive. I bought a 4 foot piece (I ended up using 2 feet) and it cost me $5.00, My local Napa stocks it, along with the proper fitting that I used. It uses compression fittings, just as if you used copper, and there is an insert in the fitting to keep the plastic from collapsing. Important factor here is don't kink the hose, make gentle bends---it will actually find its own way. This oil line is at an approximate 10 degree downward angle. To give a little more perspective, a 10 percent grade hill typically runs at about 6 degrees. This should supply extra oil to the front without issue.





The last thing I did, was to cut a couple of notches in the front "horseshoe". I was reading an old post of someone doing this and because it can hinder oil getting to the dips in the pan. Others say not true. While oil will get where it needs to be ultimately, I can attest taking this engine apart, there was a dam of sludgy oil up against the horseshoe ring. Oil drain back is very important for engines in general, and I am conscious of it because I build high performance V-8 engines. It certainly doesn't hurt to do this and anything you can do to encourage oil to flow back and to where you want to is a advantage. The slots are about 5/16" wide and just shy of half way through the thickness of the retaining ring. I used a cut off wheel to make them. The slots point down, the one on the side will be in proximity to your pan fitting.



(Message edited by Chad_Marchees on February 26, 2017)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Tillstrom 30 miles N of Memphis TN on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 08:40 am:

You will find that puts a bunch of oil to the front. I've done that to about 4-5 T's now (not all of them were mine). Cheap insurance against a plugged internal oil line.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 12:02 pm:

Thanks Gary. It was your pics that inspired me. Having plenty of oil to the front is the goal. I will probably do a test to see how much it puts out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Tuesday, February 28, 2017 - 07:43 pm:

Nice oiler! I must admit I'd never seen nor heard of grabbing oil from the Bendix cover before.
I'm excited to hear about your tests.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Barrett in Auburn Ca. on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 - 03:20 am:

Chad, anyone who has had a bendix cover loosen up can tell you that a tremendous amount of oil moves through there, so that is a good spot to pick it up. I would advise you to be vigilant in keeping the screws tight as adding forces from oil plumbing to it will make it more likely to come loose. As long as I am on the subject, using a 12 volt battery on a T starter causes the shaft to flex and the bendix to touch the cover. It can loosen up, leak all the oil out, and destroy the bearings in short order. Keep a watch for leaks under the starter area whenever you are on a break on a drive.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 - 06:13 am:

Thanks Erik and Duey.

Eric, to the added stresses, that is part of the reason I wanted a flexible line. I was going to do another style that uses a cloth covered hose (which may have looked more period), but wanted to not spend a lot on this endeavor. With the female pipe bungs now welded in place, I can always change the other fittings abd hose later on if I choose. If I paint the brass fittings black, most probably would never notice the whole set up anyhow.

I am on 6 volts so no worries there. I also as mentioned had to get some new bendix cover screws (which I ordered from Bob's yesterday) because the heads on the ones currently are pretty tired and I fear I won't be able to tighten them in the future....or loosen them for that matter.

I also used a thin smearing of Ultra black RTV vs. a gasket feeling that it would not only seal, but help hold the cover on if the screws did loosen up. If the old timers had RTV way back when, they probably wouldn't have used gaskets either. In my opinion, RTV was made for poor fitting surfaces such as a Model T. The trick is not to over do it so it squeezes out everywhere.

I tried to think of everything I could.....sometimes I forget though, just ask my wife.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Zachary Dillinger - Charlotte, MI on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 - 08:29 am:

Thinking outside of the box here (and maybe too far), but has anyone tried a rivet nut for this type of installation? It would eliminate the welding / brazing and I imagine it would be oil tight if properly installed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Tillstrom 30 miles N of Memphis TN on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 - 09:33 am:

I don't believe there is room in the bendix cover for anything to protrude into it. My experience with "rivnuts" working around airplanes is, I'm not a fan.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 - 09:54 am:

Nice. News to me. Never seen one before.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ernie Williams on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 - 10:25 am:

What timing. Just last week a bolt came loose on my Bendix and knocked the Bendix cover off. I didn't hear it. I backed out of the garage to turn the car around. I can assure you, that AN AWFUL LOT of oil comes out of the Bendix hole in the hogshead! Saw it quick, no damage done, but a big spill clean up was needed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ernie Williams on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 - 10:29 am:

P.S. As a follow up the Erik's 12V comment, my car is 12V. That's the way the car came to me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthonie Boer --- Klaaswaal NL on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 - 10:55 am:

I did nearly the same as Chad.
1276M
1277R


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Barrett in Auburn Ca. on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 - 11:16 am:

Good choice on the flexible oil line. I also use 12V on some of my cars. It has become a habit o keep a watch for oil leaks. We have put new bearings in a few engines for starter cover leaks, also broken oil level sight glasses.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 - 12:25 pm:

Erik - That's exactly what happened to me! Unknowingly lost all the oil on a tour and it cost me an engine! Engine rebuilder's "diagnosis" was that something had come loose from the bendix and tore the bendix cover loose. Must have happened when I started the car in a very noisy area (adjacent to noisy railroad yard) and didn't hear any unusual noise when starting the engine, however, so railroad so noisy that I hardly heard the starter at all when starting the engine. After driving only a mile or two, engine seized up due to unknowingly loosing all the oil!


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