Tire, tube, & hardware questions

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Tire, tube, & hardware questions
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 04:05 pm:


Model T era bridge washers have a raised ridge like this to press against the rubber for a good seal. The new ones are flat, with no ridge. With new tubes that have the metal stems already sealed to the rubber, I would guess the flat ones are OK. Is that right?


These valve covers screw directly onto the stem, not onto a separate nut like the nickel era covers.

Is this the correct nut to use with these covers? It looks that way to me, but I want to be sure before I order.
https://www.modeltford.com/item/RW1-OR.aspx

Flaps, or no flaps?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 04:54 pm:

The original valve stems are smaller than the current batch of repros Steve. Here's what an original brass era set looked like for one tube:



With the current tubes you can use the flat bottom bridge washer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 05:03 pm:

There is good evidence that all the dust caps from the brass era may have been nickel plated. Here's a bunch of unrestored ones, they always have traces of nickel plating.



Personally I like them polished brass. Just had to mention in light of the correctness police.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 05:40 pm:

When you use a smaller diameter Schrader dust cover that screws directly on the larger diameter valve, there is a round knurled lock nut that is screwed down tight against the felloe, not the hex style nut with interior and exterior threads shown by Royce.

This is how my dad's 1910 IHC roadster is set up - knurled valve lock nut is against the felloe. The dust cap screws directly on the valve stem threads.

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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 06:03 pm:

That won't work on a Model T dust cap Eric. You would not have anything to screw the dust cap to!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 07:53 pm:

Royce:

I'm aware of that.

However, Steve is showing a dust cap that screws directly on the valve stem itself - the longer and wider stem on the current inner tube offerings, not a correct Model T stem.

If he goes with that route, he'll need the knurled lock nut against the felloe.

This is the correct dust cap for my 1917 Ford. The nut will not work with current tubes off the shelf because the inside diameter of the nut is too small. Even if you use stamped nuts with the larger inner diameter, the cap is too short.

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If you don't want to install the correct stem, here is the solution for the current tubes with wider and longer valve stems - this stamped nut fits the larger diameter stem and the dust cap is longer.

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(Message edited by Erik_johnson on February 26, 2017)

(Message edited by Erik_johnson on February 26, 2017)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Syverson on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 10:25 pm:

If you use the current available metal stem inner tubes, and you decide to use flaps, you can put the valve stem through the hole in the flap and then install the bridge washer and it's nut. So you are tightening the flap against the tube. Only on current style tubes where the stems are sealed to the tube already. The bad thing about the wider stems is that it takes forever to unscrew the valve cover to check the air pressure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 12:08 pm:

The current tubes with vulcanized stems are a joke. The only way to get it right is to use original parts. The current brass stems are too big of a diameter, which is the size much larger cars used. There was an old photo posted recently of a new 1917 in the dealers show room. That car was still using the knurled dust cap, indicating that it would have been nickel plated. I have a number of those plus the brass ones. I wouldn't use the flat bridge washers period, although as Steve mentioned, with the vulcanized stems they would probably be ok. The other reason not to use the vulcanized stems, they are too heavy. With the speeds we drive today, who needs to throw our wheels out of balance? I only wish Coker would do their homework, and get things right. For those who are familiar with A&L Model A parts back east, they have faithfully reproduced all of the Model A valve stems, and even have the Schrader logo on them. Why can't Coker do the same? I'm sure with all the money they make, they could afford to do it. Until that happens, do your research and use original parts!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Tuesday, February 28, 2017 - 08:35 pm:

Here's what you need Steve:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/599638/640373.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 - 12:00 am:

I'll watch for original type stems at swap meets. Tubes with rubber stems are ten bucks cheaper than new metal stem tubes. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 - 11:45 am:

What got me started on using metal stems, is I had a tube that had a bad rubber valve stem on it. I cut it off, and used an old metal one I had laying around. Back then, I had no idea which way to install the bridge washer, and had to look at some old catalogs to find out. I've been collecting them ever since, and when I have rubber stems go bad, I replace them with the correct metal valve stems. This was probably 30 years ago.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 01:57 am:

Steve, I can't believe you are even contemplating using flaps!!!! Save yourself at least $150 plus shipping and make rim Liners from use bicycle tubes.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 10:23 am:

I can't believe there are still people in this club that don't know the difference between a flap and a rim liner!


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