Otis, Frank and Clarence are getting a baby brother this week

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Otis, Frank and Clarence are getting a baby brother this week
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Mays on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 07:06 pm:

https://youtu.be/jOrGufKJpuY Freighter Jim is on the way here with a 1925 Tudor that sat in the barn since 1946, where it was parked by the first owner. Original owner, 1881/1956, bought the T in mid 1925 (March,'15 engine). The car was pulled out of the barn about 3 months ago and started for the first time in more than 70 years. The car was hauled to a parking lot so Jim could load. Still has all the original interior, including a headliner with no rips. Original owner and wife are shown. I will do my best to get the car back on the road looking as close as possible as to how it was when parked.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Mays on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 07:36 pm:

Should have said "March, 1925 engine". The car was originally green.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 07:41 pm:

I notice they put new metal on the roof over the T, must have thought it was special!
Can't do u-tube, so awaiting photos posted here!
Sounds fab!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 07:57 pm:

That video is great. Proves how tough these little cars are. What a find.
Thanks for sharing this.
Drive safe and often


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Allen - Conroe, TX on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 08:03 pm:

I love it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 08:52 pm:

" The car was originally green."

I thought the colors did not come about until the Improved cars
arrived in 1926, no ???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 09:02 pm:

Friday afternoon loading up ......



Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Mays on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 09:10 pm:

A little of the green color can still be seen on some of the car, plus the granddaughter of the original owner rode in and played in the car and she remembers the car was green


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Allen - Conroe, TX on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 09:20 pm:

John....I washed the '24 with dilute soap and water, then when it dried, I treated the paint with a paint additive called "Penetrol".

I'm thinking it would work on your new car very well. There's two kinds, one is for oil-based paints, one isn't. You want the one for oil-based paints.

I use a clean shop rag and then rub in a small amount. Then Iimmediately wipe it all off....dry. This gives you a dull shine with no wetness or oily residue.....and the stuff doesn't really have much of a smell either.

Here's a before and after....the body is treated....the splash apron isn't.

That's the can of Penetrol on the running board.



(Message edited by rustyfords on February 26, 2017)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 09:52 pm:

What a great story. That T is gonna be on the road again..Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 09:56 pm:

Nice one John!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 10:32 pm:

Wonder why he parked it? Is 1915 engine a misprint?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Mays on Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 10:59 pm:

Yes, look at the next post---was corrected when I said, " should have said March, 1925 engine-- ". I wouldn't make a very good secretary.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eubanks, Powell, TN on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 08:24 am:

What are those diagonal shocks on the front? Never seen any like that on a T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Mays on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 08:34 am:

The "shocks" are new to me as well. I'll get some close up pictures and post as soon as the car gets here.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 08:48 am:

Maybe the dealer helped the owner to get a green car by repainting it when new or almost new?

Maybe it was parked since the owner didn't need to drive much after retirement - or maybe because the neighborhood kids laughed at the old car, any number of reasons including the need for new bands - and new bands will be needed in any case after such a long time sitting (plus a checkup of the rear axle)

The empty spare rim on the back may have been empty since new - that's how the cars were delivered from Ford unless you paid extra :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Mays on Tuesday, February 28, 2017 - 02:15 pm:

Freighter Jim just left after dropping off Marvin, our new 1925 Tudor. I'll spend some time deciding what to do with the T but hopefully whatever is done won't make a difference in the appearance. I'll post more pictures of the interior but wanted to get this posted today.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Tuesday, February 28, 2017 - 02:29 pm:

Looks like Marvin is resting comfortably after his long trip. Just looking at him makes me smile and he is not even mine.... unless!
Drive safe and often


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Mays on Tuesday, February 28, 2017 - 04:20 pm:

Here are some pictures of the interior showing the headliner, front springs and windshield motor. I've never seen a wiper motor on a T. There is lettering on the wiper motor but can't make it out yet. The spring on the front seems to be dealer installed, but again, that's new to me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Tuesday, February 28, 2017 - 04:35 pm:

I was with Kim Dobbins when he loaded the Rip Van Winkle car in Bakersfield a few years ago

I hauled a nice original Model T that Steve Redelman sold to an overseas buyer a couple years ago.

I have transported well over 100 Model T vehicles.

This is the nicest complete original unrestored documented one owner Model T that I have hauled.

I am glad John bought it .....


Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Allen - Conroe, TX on Tuesday, February 28, 2017 - 05:26 pm:

Beautiful.

Can't wait to see it in person John.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Doris, Arizona on Tuesday, February 28, 2017 - 07:16 pm:

Nice '25 Tudor John! Those are interesting coil spring "shock absorbers". I believe your windshield wiper is a Folberth vacuum wiper.

Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Mays on Tuesday, February 28, 2017 - 08:38 pm:

Thanks Bob. That's the first one I have ever seen. I Googled Folberth Vacuum wiper and there is one on eBay right now for $29.00. Thanks,


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Allen - Conroe, TX on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 - 12:57 pm:

I think that space in John's shop is a triage unit for Model T barn cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 - 02:50 pm:

I think that space is the Chapel Of The Model T.


Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 - 02:54 pm:

John, can you post a photo of that patch on ftont fender in Dons photo? How is it atatched? I need to patch on front fender of my 26RPU. I like that one. Thanks!
Drive safe and often


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Allen - Conroe, TX on Saturday, March 04, 2017 - 12:54 pm:

Had the pleasure of seeing the car up close this morning. It is an incredible time capsule.









(Message edited by rustyfords on March 04, 2017)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Saturday, March 04, 2017 - 12:59 pm:

Don,

I got the impression this was a complete original low mileage Model T put in storage for other than mechanical reasons.


Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Allen - Conroe, TX on Saturday, March 04, 2017 - 01:07 pm:

Jim, it's certainly complete and unmolested.

I don't about the mileage part. It's obvious that it hasn't seen excessive mileage, but it was well-used (but not abused) before it was parked.

What's impressive is how utterly complete and original it is. I spent a lot of time taking photos under the car to get an idea of what, on my 24 Touring, is farm-modification and what isn't.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Saturday, March 04, 2017 - 02:37 pm:

Don,

I would expect to see more damage to the fenders - more stress cracks on the running boards and fenders - more wear on the driver side wood floor that I see with high mileage Model T's.

It would be interesting to see what line of work the original owner was in - I doubt he was a farmer but who knows ?

Most curious to me is why a good running T was put into storage - either there are other mechanical problems
with it not engine related or ( my speculation) - another car was bought.


Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Allen - Conroe, TX on Saturday, March 04, 2017 - 06:35 pm:

Jim....I think we're both thinking the same thing...but we may be speaking of "low mileage" differently.

I consider low mileage to be say....30K and below. I don't think this car has mileage that low. The pedals show a lot of wear, the engine is pretty greasy and things like the fan pulley are pretty worn.

That having been said, I don't it's a high mileage car either. I think it's somewhere in between. But, in spite of the fact that it does appear to have a fair amount of mileage, it was obviously never abused. Just the opposite, it appears to have been cared for during its limited time as a daily driver.

It's a great car. I'm glad John is its custodian.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Mays on Saturday, March 04, 2017 - 07:14 pm:

Regarding the original owner, he ran a General Store in Chatsworth, Georgia. He and his wife had 5 children and one of the sons took over the operation of the store and the farm. The son that took over the store and the farm was a good friend of the wife of the man that pulled Marvin out of the barn and got him running.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Saturday, March 04, 2017 - 07:15 pm:

Don,

Good points.

Makes you wonder what the original owner did for a living - I guess you could rack up 30K miles easily in 21 years.

John is the right fit to be sure.

Glad you got to see the car.


Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Saturday, March 04, 2017 - 07:39 pm:

Its always great to see a T in its original condition and found in a barn or shed. A great survivor! T's like this that are left out behind the barn don't last long in the weather and elements. A lucky find to be sure.

And really straight too! No warped or bent up fenders.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, March 04, 2017 - 08:10 pm:

this thread reminded me of back in 1969 (I was still in high school, probably about 15 years old) when I was visiting friends in Villa Park, they lived (one still lives there) on Brynmar Drive (actually originally part of my cousin's ranch, the Dodsons). I mention all this because maybe someone will know the vehicle. Somehow I met one of their neighbors, on a nearby street. in their garage was a Model T fordor. Now at the time I wars restoring my Model A, wasn't "into" model Ts, but was definitely interested in any early cars. The thing that amazed me about this T was it was unrestored, still had a very visible red pinstripe just below the belt molding, the windows were raised and lowered by fancy straps with holes in them for various window openings; the interior was mint. The doors opened and closed like a vault. Wish I could tell you more, but this car was easily a "Rip Van Winkle" job. I also remembering wishing my A was in such a condition (it wasn't, it spent a decade out in the snow and rain).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Sunday, March 05, 2017 - 02:56 am:

That wiper motor looks a LOT like the one my '27 Paige had as standard equipment. There were different models and sizes available from about 1922, and that "tube" design faded away about 1929. They used to show up often at swap meets, but seem to be rare today. Most of them are non-functional without rebuilding. They have a pot metal center piece that is often in poor condition. However, IF you are careful? I have known a few people to successfully take these apart, and using copious amounts of "two-ton" clear epoxy, make them fully functional again and last for years.
The '25 Studebaker I used to have also had one. I epoxied it successfully and it was still working years later. But I have long since lost track of it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Sunday, March 05, 2017 - 10:17 pm:

It's not quite unmolested. John, you should be able to make a dollar or two trading that early tapered leaf front spring for the correct chopped end one. Then that money could be used to buy a model T horn.
I envy you fellows being able to find such nice survivors. I had one back in the 1960's, but in those days it just had to be restored. I am currently repainting the fenders and body on a 1926 roadster pickup. From the photos of the car the owners showed me, I think they now see that it too should have been preserved.

Allan from down under.


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