1925 roadster pickup

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: 1925 roadster pickup
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Hood -Long Beach, California on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 03:57 am:

Looked at a 1925 roadster pickup yesterday. It hasn't run in a few years and the owner has asked the Long Beach Clubs help in getting it running and roadworthy.

It looks to be all original and complete. The serial number is 119xxxxx so it is definitely a 1925. It still has the engine pans and original paint as well as Minnesota dealer plates on the bed and Minnesota Pioneer license plates. It also has pin stripes on the bed, body, and wheels. I think it is a dealer built pickup rather than a factory built one due to the dealer plates and pin stripes, but I am not a 25 RPU expert. The bed appears to be 1925, no fender reveal and front stake pockets, but the rear fenders look like roadster fenders and the tailgate has Ford script. I couldn't get a good look at the rear spring, but it appears to be 8 leaves and the front is 7 leaves.

What is Larry's opinion?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Peterson on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 07:32 am:

Gee I missed that one, it would look good at my place in Minnesota. Very nice, thanks for the pictures. I hope it is just a tune-up and a clean-up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Alexander in Albion, Maine on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 07:51 am:

Looks good to me. Very similar to my '25 pu. Many dealers did put them together as I believe that the factory only did it for a couple months in '25. Tailgate with Ford logo is correct but the pin striping was added, probably by the dealer. I think the spring leaves are also correct. Is there a battery box cover behind the driver in the box bed ? Looks like a great ride once you get it going.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 08:02 am:

Woodhead Ford, neat! They had a very impressive collection that was auctioned off several years ago.

http://fordlegacymn.com/woodhead-ford/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 08:22 am:

What a nice unmolested RPU!

(I would love it and squeeze it and call it George :-) )


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Thomas on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 08:23 am:

Nice time capsule indeed. From what I know, the few RPU that were built by the factory in '25 did not have the sheet metal sheathing under the pick up frame. Seeing as this one does, I assume that it was a converted roadster. Having said that, the rivets along the bed rail are rather convincing to me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 08:54 am:

Jeff -- Thanks for taking and posting all those nice detail pics.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kim Dobbins on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 10:25 am:

Very cool Jeff, that's is a nice one!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 11:03 am:

Minnesota Pioneer Plate 1697 was originally registered to Joseph Lundquist of 3915 17th Ave S, Minneapolis, MN for a 1925 Ford pickup. I don't have issue dates on my list but, based on the number, I would say the plate was issued in the early 1960s.

The Woodhead nameplate is most likely not original to the truck and appears to be from the 1930s. 1) Ford was not using the oval in 1925. 2) Woodhead started selling Fords during the teens in Brainerd, MN but they did not have a Ford dealership in Minneapolis until 1926. The building still stands at 412 E. Lake Street. (It is only 1.5 miles as the crow flies from where Lundquist lived at 39th and 17th.)

Based on what I see, the truck has been repainted over the original paint (and perhaps over some rust and dirt). That is why it is you see a lot of alligatoring, cracking, checking, flaking and wrinkling of the paint. If you look at some spots, you can see some of the original paint where the repaint has lifted.

(Message edited by Erik_johnson on February 27, 2017)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 11:12 am:

I thought I'd heard of most '25 pickups, but not that one! That is and exceptional example indeed of a late '25 pickup. Notice the '26 features. I hope you can find a good home for it, as you will never find a better example of an original.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 11:20 am:

I thought I'd heard of most '25 pickups, but not that one! That is and exceptional example indeed of a late '25 pickup. Notice the '26 features. I hope you can find a good home for it, as you will never find a better example of an original.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Hood -Long Beach, California on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 01:34 pm:

I hadn't thought of the blue oval not being period correct as Eric points out. I wonder if this truck was possibly a part of the dealers collection as posted by Derek, and therefore "restored" with a possible repaint, pinstripes, and the dealer plates.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Hood -Long Beach, California on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 01:42 pm:

The only pieces that look to be missing is the front bow for the top, and the correct irons for the folded top to rest on. There are just bolts in the holes now, and they are not long enough for the cradles
to be in the right position for the top bows to rest in them.

Bill, yes there is a battery box access in the bed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Peterson on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 02:22 pm:

The pickup was not part of the Woodhead auction that was held Sept. 18, 2004. I was there for the whole auction. If it was there I would have tried to buy it. It could have been sold years earlier. Bob.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 02:56 pm:

Jeff:

John Woodhead, III had a collection of Fords from 1903 to 2002. The collection was auctioned off in 2004.

All the cars were in pristine condition - either low mileage originals or professional restorations. I saw the collection 15 or 20 years ago. I never saw that truck. It was not in the auction so I doubt John Woodhead, III. owned it. However, there is no reason why you couldn't call him if there is a slim chance that his grandfather (John I) or father (John, Jr.) owned it and/or displayed it at the dealership, etc.

As far as I know, John Woodhead, III was never involved in the operation dealership as he was too young. He was a banker and involved in other enterprises. His grandfather established the dealership and his father later bought it from his grandfather.

As I indicated earlier, Woodhead Ford was located 421 E. Lake Street starting in 1926. It was sold and renamed Bill Boyer Ford in 1967. I don't know when Bill Boyer left that location. Lake Street runs the full width of Minneapolis and there were many dealerships but they all closed and/or relocated to the suburbs by the late 1980s. Boyer no longer deals in automobiles - strictly commercial trucks. (I had been in the building many times in the 1980s and 1990s because it was a fantastic thrift store/junk store and it was one of my regular stops when hunting for collectibles.)

The Woodhead plate was probably just stuck on the truck as a decoration. The Minneapolis AAA sticker is probably from the 1950s or 1960s.

My dad has been in the antique car hobby since 1948 and is a charter member of the Minnesota Region of the AACA. He's lived in the same south Minneapolis neighborhood his whole life which is about three miles away from where Joseph Lundquist lived. He doesn't remember anyone named Joseph Lundquist. If I show him the photos of the truck, there may be a chance that he may recognize it.

If a person wanted to research the history of the truck, I've already provided a major piece of information. You could hunt down Mr. Lundquist, or, if he has passed away, locate relatives and see if they know anything about the truck. Also, the current owner should be able to tell you from whom he purchased the truck. You could also work backwards from there.

(Message edited by Erik_johnson on February 27, 2017)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 04:36 pm:

Erik mentioned the "rivets" along the bed rail. These are actually carriage bolts through the body rail to hold the bed on. These are why I'm not going to put my 25 Ford bed on Barney--I don't want to drill holes in the sides of the bed rail, in case I want to go back to a turtle deck. However, I do have the remains of a Perry wooden bed that doesn't bolt through the body sides I will use instead.
(Sorry Larry, Barney will not become a "real" 25 PU)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Allen - Conroe, TX on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 05:00 pm:

While I'm new to Model T's, I'm not new to old cars.

My particular interest has become cars wearing their original paint and I've become pretty good at spotting originality.

This pickup appears to be a old repaint based on the way the paint is cracking and a few other clues.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not running the car down...it's still very neat, but most likely a repaint.....probably more than 50 or 60 years ago.

(Message edited by rustyfords on February 27, 2017)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 07:07 pm:

It's a repaint over the original paint, rust and probably over dirt.

That's why the paint has alligatored as I mentioned earlier.

It's typical of what happens when you paint over the original Ford factory paint. Also, the original Ford finish does not behave in that manner even if the car has poor storage or sits outside and rust starts blossoming through the paint.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Allen - Conroe, TX on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 07:30 pm:

I think it was pretty well established above why the Woodhead sign wasn't original to the car.

But I might add that it would be kind of odd in 1925 for a dealership to be touting the fact that they'd been around since 1913.....that's only 12 years!

Something about original old cars....I just can't get enough of them. I have a 66 F100 short box Styleside that has thoroughly original paint and low miles. The paint is only rubbed through a little bit where the original owner leaned his arm out the window.

My '54 Ford Mainline had just over 10,000 miles on it when I bought it in 1986 and I drove it like a regular used car....put 80,000 miles on it before I did a body of rebuild. The original paint was long gone.

I've had a few other thoroughly original paint cars...a slant six Plymouth Valiant, a 39 Ford deluxe and a 53 Plymouth Belvedere hardtop to name a few. And...I believe the limited amount of paint remaining on my newly acquired 24 Touring is factory paint.

This '25 however is, at least a repaint, if not a rebuild....which is fine, but one should approach it knowing that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Monday, February 27, 2017 - 08:06 pm:

The 1913 date is strange because John Woodhead, I didn't open a Ford dealership until 1916 in Brainerd, MN.

He did, however, work for the Ford Motor Co. branch in Minneapolis before that so he was probably including those years.


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