Model t saw mill

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Model t saw mill
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By joe macintosh on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 12:18 am:

I picked up this sawmill for the 1927 engine .
The engine turns over fine and was not stuck.
Inside the transmission looks like new .No scoring on the brake or reverse drums and minor scoring on the high low. I am going to start this engine as soon as I can round up a carburetor.
Was stored in a bar for many years


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 01:43 am:

Will you be using the sawmill, or just taking the engine for something else ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Barrett in Auburn Ca. on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 02:51 am:

Most of the bars I have been in would not be a good place for a buzz saw.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James G Fisher III Peachtree City, GA on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 06:05 am:

Very cool. Ive never seen one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eugene Story on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 06:07 am:

If you ever sharpen the teeth file the back side of the teeth not the front or the cutting side, because you loose the angle of the teeth and get a saw set to set the teeth. If you sharpen a lot you will shorten the teeth so deepen the cut between the teeth and don,t cut your thumb off and if you do don't point your finger to show where you did it or it will get the finger too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Thomas on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 08:27 am:

Sounds like Eugene speaks with experience.

I missed one of these in non rusted - stored inside condition a few years back. I was too green to see that the T engine was perfect and of brass vintage. Not sure what OSHA would have to say about operation of a saw like that in 2017.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lenney Glenn on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 08:33 am:

Looks like a "woodsaW", or as others would say a buzzsaw.If so where would the operator be positioned? If on one side the firewood blocks would fall inside the framework. If on the other he would have to drag the log across the framework. My father had a woodsaw set up on an old chev chassis. There was a shaft across the rear wheels with a pulley for each wheel. He would drive it to the worksite. then screw the shaft/pulleys down until tire/pulley contact was made. Of course the rear end was blocked up off the ground. What has been installed in the driveshaft?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By joe macintosh on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 08:51 am:

The saw was barn kept, until the barn fell down a couple of years ago exposing it to the weather.
I will have to dismantle the saw as I live in the city and my neighbours could not appreciate the beauty of it !!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 09:21 am:

Painy a lovely scene on the blade and diplay the entire work of art in the front yard with pride!!! I would like to see how blade is attatched to driveshaft and how it is supported. Cool piece.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 09:26 am:

Refurbishing one now that I saved from the scrapper in upstate NY. '25 engine powering a cutdown Model A rear end with pulley on axle that drives the blade. Blade guard is made from a porcelain (double-sided Valvoline Oil sign). 36" blade.

As found:



Driveline details:



Moving it to pull the engine (new wheels and rubber):



New cradle for the blade assembly made from white oak. Blade arbor was held in place with T bearing caps - those were cleaned up and reinstalled:



(Message edited by Conversiont on March 02, 2017)

(Message edited by Conversiont on March 02, 2017)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 09:29 am:

Arbor mount:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Landry, Hudson, NH on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 09:36 am:

Lenney - it is interesting to speculate how this was used. At first I thought it might have been set up like the one below, but the rollers at the back of the blade and the block of wood strapped down in front of the blade don't completely make sense to me. Most T saws in pictures seem to have the blade in the front-to-back orientation relative to the chassis.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lenney Glenn on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 09:44 am:

Once dismantled it will NEVER be reassembled. I would get it running, clean it up, and be liberal with linseed oil. It will be wonderful as is. Lock and cover the blade to protect curious children's fingers. a fine example of the versatility of the model t ford.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By joe macintosh on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 09:51 am:

As you can see the carriage is on rollers and slides back and forth


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 09:54 am:

The planks form the cradle. Really a nice rig - too bad you're not in a location you could keep her as she is.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By joe macintosh on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 09:57 am:

this is the drive line. Not sure what the coupler is ??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 10:19 am:

The coupler looks like a Spicer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 10:37 am:

I use a saw on the back of one of my 8N Ford tractors- a factory "Dearborn" outfit, and I have a old 1920's Hercules engine/sawmill rig out in the fence that I may drag out and get running "One of these days..."
I have a neighbor about a mile away who uses his similar saw in the fall to cut his firewood. I go out on the back porch in the morning and I can hear his blade go ZZIIINNNGGGG! through his stove links when he's working it- I love that sound.
I wonder if he does the same when I'm the one doing the cutting.

It too bad you will not be reassembling it as a buzz saw, but as you say, it probably wouldn't get much use in your neighborhood. Maybe someone else could use the parts you don't need?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 10:45 am:

Before the idea is lost from wood rot,i would replace the planks with treated wood.I would also cover the planks in [the table] with sheet metal so the wood to be cut slides easily.I also like the outboard table plank as it will give the person throwing away a place to rest the wood until the cut is made and will stop saw pinch.Nope,a buzz saw and a stock model T engine will not power a saw mill! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By joe macintosh on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 10:58 am:

The saw came on a wooden axled trailer that is adjustable in length ,with wood spoked wagon wheels with inflatable tires. you can see 1/2 leaning against the trailer. one tire was flat and made it impossible to roll so I didn't re mount the saw


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By joe macintosh on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 11:05 am:

As sorry as I am to say, this saw will never be used by me as I cannot store or leave on my property.If somebody wants to step up in the Toronto Ontario area I will sell it to be preserved , other than that I will have to save the motor and discard the rest.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Stephens - Arnold, CA on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 11:05 am:

What a great project, Joe!

I'd never seen one in action until just the other day when my brother forwarded this on to me: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2LMv_Y4axYw

The video portion starts @ 1:30

Tom


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 01:33 pm:

Thank you for the link I used to have a T-9 like the one pictured only i built a hyd 6 way blade for it! Bud.


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