Plate glass windshield!

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Plate glass windshield!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jonathan Delancey on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 11:36 pm:

I was told the windshield in my Roadster is plate glass. Seems dangerous. The glass is 5/16" thick. I guess I should replace it with safety glass. Where do I get new glass?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kirk Peterson on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 11:42 pm:

Remove the windshield with its frame and take it to a local glass shop

Hope this helps


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Thursday, March 02, 2017 - 11:51 pm:

In the last windshield frame I had redone
I used laminated glass was not auto grade but close
Yes plate glass will turn into many sharp flying objects with the least assistance
Don't ask how I know


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, March 03, 2017 - 12:04 am:

Kirk is correct. Any local glass shop should be able to do the job. But if your frame needs new brass channel, they won't know where to get it. You can buy it by the foot from Lang's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Allen - Conroe, TX on Friday, March 03, 2017 - 07:33 am:

My great grandfather was driving home from working in the oilfield near Baytown, TX in 1934 in a Model A.

He was in a relatively minor accident, but it was forceful enough to shatter the windshield, a piece of which hit him in the neck and severed a major artery.

He bled to death sitting there in the driver's seat...in a car that he could've otherwise driven away from the accident scene.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Blanchard on Friday, March 03, 2017 - 08:23 am:

How can you tell if its plate glass or not?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RalphS in NE Oregon on Friday, March 03, 2017 - 08:44 am:

Are you sure it was a Model A? All Model A's came out of the factory with safety glass windshields, but not for the side glass windows.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Friday, March 03, 2017 - 08:44 am:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/599638/658655.html?1468424344


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Friday, March 03, 2017 - 12:01 pm:

Out goes the dangerous plate glass with help of a hammer. Its those flying shards that will spear you!



Confirmation of safety laminated glass, with the two panes sandwiched between a thin sheet of plastic, safety glass gives a double reflection of a flame!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Allen - Conroe, TX on Friday, March 03, 2017 - 12:18 pm:

Ralph....I'm not 100% sure that it was an A....that's just way it's always been told to me.

I do have a newspaper clipping somewhere in a box that describes the accident and how he died...and it does state that a piece of glass cut his neck.

It could've been a T though...it's probably unknowable at this point.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By lorenzo leon on Friday, March 03, 2017 - 12:25 pm:

Don,.. seat belts could have helped i will install seat belts on my cars + safety glass
sorry to hear about your grandfather


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Layden Butler on Friday, March 03, 2017 - 12:51 pm:

In the 1920s it was the glass that was the leading cause of death in auto accidents not blunt force trauma. Many people would not purchase or ride in sedans because of all the glass.

When you take the frame in the glass shop do not tell them it is for a windshield. It is illegal for the shop to put in anything but windshield thickness safety glass if they know it is a windshield. Tell them to use the best they can get in the frame/channel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By steven miller on Friday, March 03, 2017 - 01:35 pm:

Dan shows a good way to check for safety glass. If you are not allowed to play with matches a coin held on edge against the glass will also have two reflections.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Landry, Hudson, NH on Friday, March 03, 2017 - 02:19 pm:

Laminated glass is two (or more) panes of glass laminated with a plastic sheet in the middle. Tempered is heat treated by heating the glass to a certain temperature, then cooling the surfaces quickly. That puts a lot of tension in the surface, which strengthens the glass and causes the entire sheet to crumble if it is broken. It also has some sensitivity to being hit on the edge, although that's less so with thicker pieces.

Both laminated and tempered could be considered to be "safety glass".

It would be very hard to tell the difference between un-tempered and tempered glass without a tempering logo (bug). Flat glass is often tempered in a flat oven so the slight depressions from hanging the glass may not be present.

I used to buy 100's of square feet of glass a year - most of it tempered. I don't know current pricing, but I wouldn't expect there to be a big difference in pricing between laminated and tempered. One thing to remember is that there are several different edge treatments you can choose, from "seamed" to fully polished. You'll care if the edge will show. Work with your glass supplier as they seem to have different names for the same treatment. I never had any issue getting tempered glass without the logo, but that may depend on your supplier and local laws.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Heavner on Friday, March 03, 2017 - 02:42 pm:

Hey, Jonathan, Steven, and Don. You just saved me a pile of money. I was also wondering if I had safety glass in my runabout. After testing first with a coin and then a candle, safety glass was confirmed. I even tested it on a known plate glass (window) and safety glass (door). It all had the same result. So thanks again guys. I feel a bit safer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, March 03, 2017 - 03:39 pm:

Usually you can spot safety glass by looking at the edge, you can see the two pieces and the plastic between.
The accident could have been in a Model A, apparently not ALL A's had safety glass windshields; early on that was the only piece of safety glass, side, rear were plate (my '30 sport coupe had plate in the side and back windows). Safety glass all around became an extra-cost option somewhere in the production run, and was more common in the '31 models.
As to finish: most glass shops today will sand the edge, especially the visible edge in windshields. The sides are important in windows that go up and down. For the visible edges, I like to get some wet/dry paper, and WET, sand the edges until I'm up to at least 600 grit; I usually put masking tape on the sides of the glass just in case I slip! you can end up with a nice polished edge that looks like what the dime store glass shelf edges looked like when we were kids. If you're really careful, you can use polishing compound to get it really really smooooth. A little oil on the edge can also hide stuff. In the old days ('30s - '40s) the edges were painted to keep moisture from delaminating the plastic.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jonathan Delancey on Saturday, March 04, 2017 - 12:40 pm:

I checked with a lighter next to the window, and there were two distinct reflections! This means I'm good to go?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Saturday, March 04, 2017 - 03:23 pm:

If it's not it sure would be safer and cheap to get the windshield changed at a glass shop as mentioned above. JMHO Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Saturday, March 04, 2017 - 07:06 pm:

Two reflections is good. As confirmation, if you look closely at the edge of the glass, you can usually see the two panes with the thin plastic in between.


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