OT - Shoulder Replacement/Medical

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: OT - Shoulder Replacement/Medical
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Saturday, March 04, 2017 - 07:16 pm:

-Looking for input-
Anybody who has experienced? About 8 years ago, I had my rotator cuff repaired and bicep tendon re-attached. Had been reasonably functional, but now 'clunky' has been temperamental and contributing to sleep deprivation. Doc took X-rays of the arthritic shoulder, and mentioned "replacement"... Am wondering if anyone has experienced doing this? Should I try the cortisone treatments? I don't want to give up using my tools, or cranking a T! Thanks.
Marv


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob from Nova Scotia on Saturday, March 04, 2017 - 07:24 pm:

Getting it done will be the best thing you could imagine. Joint replacements now are like putting new parts on a car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mitch Owen on Saturday, March 04, 2017 - 08:23 pm:

I am in same situation, arthritis, bone spurs, loose bicep anchor, etc. from prior repair. Still have a little cartilage left so we decided to go in and clean up the bone/joint vs. replacement. Problem with replacements are you can't really lift anything of significant weight. Doing so wears out the appliance pretty quick I'm told. Good luck with your decision.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Saturday, March 04, 2017 - 08:57 pm:

You will need to follow through with the required therapy. One fellow I met at the beef cattle short course could spin his shoulder around better than new. On the other hand one kinfolk did not follow through with the therapy and has limited use. Its my understanding the therapy is not for scissies.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Saturday, March 04, 2017 - 09:09 pm:

I had a hip replaced one October, one shoulder replaced the following January, and the other shoulder replaced the following April. Amazingly positive results. I can ski, do gentle yoga, row a boat, paddle a kayak, and crank a T. I can do pushups, but only from the knees. But then, I'm 80, and I sure wasn't doing pushups before the replacements! Don't skimp on the PT, even when it hurts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Saturday, March 04, 2017 - 09:16 pm:

Gil, you're the bionic man!

"We can rebuild him". :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Albert Lemon on Saturday, March 04, 2017 - 09:31 pm:

Hey Marv, hate to be the bearer of bad news BUT, just live with it !!! I've had rotator cuff surgery twice on the same shoulder, once opened up seems that arthritis sets in. Some days are "diamonds" and some are "stone" but the pain really never goes away. The therapy is "key" and man it really hurts to lift that broom handle over your head, but you gotta do it. The cortisone shots are very short term, don't bother with it and hurts like hell when injected. By going to the "Y" and doing low key to mid level exercises does help especially during the winter. A lot of this can be attributed to getting older too. About the only thing that's GOLDEN in our later years is your URINE !!! Take care my friend, I know exactly what your going through.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, March 04, 2017 - 11:09 pm:

Just make sure you get correct parts. Show judging can be harsh
on the guy with a wrong-year shoulders on an otherwise original body.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Saturday, March 04, 2017 - 11:14 pm:

I asked my doctor if I'd be able to play the piano after surgery. He said, "Yes!" I said, "That's great! I never could before."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Pharis on Saturday, March 04, 2017 - 11:39 pm:

I'm just a whipper snapper, and I've never had any joint replaced, or any kind of surgery for that matter... But, I do manufacture joint replacements for a living.

What I can say is;
The industry is well developed and refined
The manufacturers and surgeons are experienced
The materials are better than ever
The incisions are smaller than ever
The patient outcomes have never been better
The recovery periods are shorter
The rehab routines are extremely effective (if you follow thru)

However... Knowing what I know, and despite all the pro's, there are a few things you should discuss with your doctor;
You need to understand not only the potential side effects of surgery, but the steps you must endure to correct them
Ask not only how many surgeries of this type, but how many with this particular brand and product line
Research the brand and product line independent of the hospital provided propaganda
Know the expected "life span" of the product, and what revision surgery entails

Of course this is an incomplete list of pro's and q's, its just my 2 cents.

All the first hand accounts of success can not be overlooked, the reality is joint replacement is a life saver/changer for many. The odds of having a complication are slim, but cannot be ignored.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, March 05, 2017 - 12:23 am:

Henry's comment reminded me of this:

Paddy said to Mick, "I'm getting circumcised tomorrow"
Mick replied, "I had that done when was just a few days old"
"Does it hurt?", Paddy asked
Mick thought for a moment and replied, "Well, I couldn't walk
for about a year".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Schedler, Sacramento on Sunday, March 05, 2017 - 12:46 am:

My experience with cortisone has been mostly negative. I have a half knee replacement with good results. Wish there were other parts they could replace???

Well stated Kevin!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond on Sunday, March 05, 2017 - 06:35 am:

I had shoulder repair 10 years ago. I have not heard any good about replacements. I personally would check the INFECTION RATE at the facility where the doctor does his surgery. That's the key. Joint replacement goes hand-in-hand with infection. I have a badly worn rt knee total replacement from 10 years ago. The Dr. says DO NOT replace it again- he said I guarantee the 2nd time around infection will be a problem. It's a tough decision. Best of luck! Gary


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Sunday, March 05, 2017 - 06:48 am:

READ WHAT GARY WROTE: INFECTION RATE. Yes I was shouting. My wife had an Arteriogram little over year ago, got infection and still is having problems from it. My Dad had a pace maker put in and died from the Infection he got in facility. They will not cut on me! Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Sunday, March 05, 2017 - 08:00 am:

I have a back broken in 6 places and arthritis in all of my lower back and no fluid in the discs from L5 down. Joints are really sore in the mornings but car wrecks and motorcycles are hard on the body. I have a friend of 25 years going in for his second knee replacement and every since the first he's been on a cane. He is only 54 like me. So I always so know for the doctors tune ups until I just have to have them later. Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Sunday, March 05, 2017 - 09:16 am:

Two things I know a little about due to experience. One are Model K, and the other Joint Replacement. (Both are OT on this forum..:-) )

With two knee and one hip twice (Dr. error) replacements, I've had great success. Anyone who follows me on Facebook knows I've recovered and have full range of motion with all the artificial joints.

Two years ago this July, I had shoulder surgery, much like you, with rotator cuff repair (four places) and bicep tendon reattachment. That has also gone great, and now that shoulder is equal to the "good" one.

When I went to the first Orghopedic surgeon for my shoulder (coudn't sleep, constant pain, last of strength and mobility), he wanted to do complete replacement. I did a little research and this sounded drastic and limiting (no lifting over X number of lbs., limited mobility, etc. I went to another Ortho with the same group, and he said "no, I can repair your shoulder without replacement.

I am sure glad I went for the second opinion. With that said, I know some who have had good success, as has Gil, with replacement. I suppose there will come a time when I may need to pursue that route too. However, maybe a second repair attempt could save total replacement?

For me, pushing therapy, then even pushing suggested limits has helped me overcome my replacement joint operations. Good luck, and push your therapy (as many mention above).

One last point, Burger said this jokingly (I think, never sure about him....), but he is right, make sure you're getting the right parts. There are several makers and styles of replacement joints, and I've learned vendors sell to Orthopedic Surgery groups, and I'm a little skeptical that the decision by the group/Dr. is always for the right joint for the patient, as it is what company is best at marketing their parts. Check reviews on line, after asking what replacement joint they intend to use.

I feel your pain, I'm having my other hip replaced soon too....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Barrett in Auburn Ca. on Sunday, March 05, 2017 - 11:05 am:

About five years ago I was wrestling with a spring on an Autocar truck when something in my arm went pop. The guy standing next to me heard it happen. Couldn't move my arm too well after that. I found out that things move very slowly on workman's comp cases. First they give you pills and hope you feel better. Then they shuffle you off to physical therapy which only irritates your busted shoulder. Then they finally authorize an MRI. Then you wait for an appointment with a surgeon. I go to the surgeon and it has been over a year since that "pop". This guy looks like Doogie Howser from the old TV show. Like he should be on a skateboard, not in the O.R. He looks for five seconds at my MRI pics and says "You've got a broken shoulder. When did this happen?" He was a little miffed with the delay that resulted in scar tissue and something called frozen shoulder. Too late to make a long story short, but I couldn't be happier with what he did for me. Reattached my sub scapular tendon and also my bicep tendon at a new location. Not only that, but worked around a tattoo I have on said shoulder. After faithfully doing rehab, I feel as good as new. Well, at least as good as I was before. Now I am having trouble with arthritis or tendonitis on the other side. I can only hope for results nearly as good. Marv, I hope yours works out well also. Fordially, Erik


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Sunday, March 05, 2017 - 11:13 am:

So far I'm one of the lucky ones. After enduring increasing shoulder pain, mostly left shoulder, for almost 5 years, it came to only 20 mins. at a time of sleep at night due to the pain. Went to the Ortho...conservative guy...short of it is, even after all that time caught it just in time, no surgery yet anyway, just lots and lots of therapy. So far it's making a difference. I can now sleep a good 3 hours straight. Night pain not near as bad, don't even feel any during the day when I'm vertical. Worst of it is, this all hits at the same time I'm really into the hand crank cars!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Sunday, March 05, 2017 - 11:21 am:

This OT is another great reason to stay tuned here.

Over the years I have read about and learned about many different topics. From cars to our bodies. I hope we can continue these OT's for our help and knowledge.

I too am thinking about a hip replacement, just need to get down to the sawbones and get an opinion. I too plan on seeing several different "installers" before I make the final decision.

thnx for the very insightful input,

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Sam Mendenhall on Sunday, March 05, 2017 - 12:47 pm:

Marv,I have the same problem. I do get cortisone injections every 4 months. I have had no bad experience with them, its the only thing that keeps me going. Everyone is different. Ask your doctor are you a candidate for them. I just wish I could get them more often. Good luck and health.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Sunday, March 05, 2017 - 02:54 pm:

Thanks, Guys!
Kinda like I phiggured... 'A crap shoot!'
Wasn't aware of the different replacement models (Ford or Chevy?), but that makes a lot of sense. Already aware of some pitfalls, I was hoping to hear of 'always successful' experiences. Perhaps I'm being ever hopeful?; or maybe just a fear of the unknown??
My original injury was a WC situation in 2009, with the judge "keeping treatment 'open' for 10 years".... Now, here I am. The physical therapy became compounded by "RSD/CRPS" (reflex sympathetic dystrophy / chronic regional pain syndrome), within 10 days after surgery. My arm and forearm ballooned to almost the size of my leg. Not fun! Hospital stay for 'Bier Blocks' (elevate the arm, a double tourniquet, drain blood & replace blood with Lidocaine, then alternate releases of tourniquets), presented re-hab / P.T. problems. Will still get a reaction to steroid-sensitive's (i.e. 'Zoster' vaccine for shingles), so you guys likely understand my concern. My ortho guy is nationally ranked, so I'm hoping he can provide some additional answers in a week. There will be a lot of questions.....
When 'wrenches & cranks' have been an enjoyment in life, one seems to want to keep it going!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By harold lee cartwright on Sunday, March 05, 2017 - 03:26 pm:

last march tore up left rotor cuff 100 percent doc told me they could try to fix it he said I hope to hit a home run but we may only get a bunt possible to not even get a single come home took off the sling got in the pool and started swinging my arm under water till the pain was unbearable every day for at least 1.0 hour for 6 weeks I can move it with no pain ride 200 miles on my motor cycle with no discomfort at all lot cheaper than pt age 74


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Sunday, March 05, 2017 - 06:07 pm:

Marv,
You have some "extenuating" circumstances, so I understand your concern....... Good luck, and we will pray and think of you as you move forward. Keep us posted as you make your choices if you would like. Many have been in, and almost all will be in a boat like this at some point, even though we think it will never happen to us.
Take care,
Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, March 06, 2017 - 06:04 am:

I had my first hip replacement in 2000, the other one 8 years later. At just 54, the surgeon realised I still had a lot to do. He fitted the joint from the front, so it was stable right from the start. I was able to walk on it next day. Should have done more physio to keep up mobility and range of movement. Did so on the second one and have never looked back.

The only drawback is I can no longer get travel insurance cover them, as both are now over 10 years old!

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd, ............Red Deer, Alberta on Monday, March 06, 2017 - 11:58 am:

I envy you fellows that can get your shoulders repaired. I have a torn tendon in my right shoulder that I've been told cannot be repaired because it is too deep under some other tendons. The main problem with it is that I have no strength in that shoulder, I can lift stuff straight up but not out in front.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul griesse--Granville,Ohio on Monday, March 06, 2017 - 12:15 pm:

I just had my second hip replacement...first one lasted 17 years....my second one was called a "revision"....much more cumbersome than the first time around...I 'm still on a cane after 3 months but have been pretty diligent with P T so I'm getting better...best to have these procedures before age 60----us old guys take too long to heal....Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr., Riverview, FL on Monday, March 06, 2017 - 01:30 pm:

To Marv and others contemplating joint replacement surgery. I've just learned from a friend who has had a hip replaced that some of the materials used in artificial joints may be giving off cobalt and chromium which can detrimental to the health over time. Before you choose a brand it might be wise to ask some questions. Good luck. Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Monday, March 06, 2017 - 02:00 pm:

I've been fortunate. Next click I'll turn 70 and so far no joint problems. For those of you who do need a couple of replacement parts, the advice to do your homework is very good advice. However, from my field of experience, don't let the horror stories scare you off. Once you've done your due diligence make your decisions based on the facts.

A little story:

When my grandmother was in her middle 70's her knees were in need of replacement. My cousin, who is an MD, told her he interned at Stanford with a guy who specializes in knees. He can greatly improve your mobility. She said, "Oh no. I'm too old."

Well, it turned out that she lived to age 97, and sharp as a tack until the last few weeks. During her last 15 or so years the knees were her limiting factor. Had she taken care of them when it became evident they needed replacement her last years would have been significantly different. Even it she ended up having trouble with the replacement joints, she almost undoubtedly would have been no less mobile and in no less discomfort than it turned out.

So, I guess the moral of the story is, "KEEP MOVING!!"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Wednesday, March 15, 2017 - 01:39 pm:

-An update, as promised-
"Thank you" for everyone with their experiences, suggestions, and advice.
My orthopedic appointment was yesterday. Doc looked at the X-rays, did an exam, and had some questions for me. My shoulder's arthritis has progressed significantly since 2009. Four of the five questions strongly indicated 'shoulder replacement'.... However, his last question was about attempting the cortisone treatment. Questions and discussion.... "OK." Last evening' hours reflected about a 90% improvement without the 'clunk & grind'.... More improvement today. Still some pain to the outside of the bicep, so the next few days will likely be an indicator. Doc said the cortisone treatments could be repeated in 3 to 4 months. Any immediate restrictions will be as I self-impose.
Bottom line so far? We wait and see, (and what actual 'shop time' reveals.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Wednesday, March 15, 2017 - 02:05 pm:

Marv..sounds good. Any time you can avoid surgery, you're better off. And like you said, you'll have to impose your own lifestyle restrictions. That's what I'm doing too. Still doing PT probably until the end of March. Things are getting better though. Hope you will too. I've enjoyed our emails..keep me posted.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Wednesday, March 15, 2017 - 05:51 pm:

A friend of mine had a hip joint replaced about a year and a half ago. His therapy went well and he was told to enjoy life. He was working on his 63 falcon in the shop 1 day and just reached for something and heard a horrible pop and he went down to the floor. They had to remove the hip joint,put in a plastic spacer,and keep him in a rest home for 3 months while they tried every trick in the book to deal with the infection. A new joint was put in and he is back on his feet and seems to be doing ok. But he went thru h-ll for 3 months with just a spacer in there to hold things in proper place.
The shots, are short term. I have had a couple in my hip and 1 or 2 in my elbow.


I would find a pain medicine that helped and I would use it sparingly. My neighbor is in a sling now from cuff repair and the therapy is really giving him a hard time.

IF you have the surgery done, get it done during the time you wouldn't be vacationing with family or driving your T .Like during the winter months. It is a long process to recover from.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Wednesday, March 15, 2017 - 08:58 pm:

Having gone through the surgery before, I'm hearing you. Today (the day after) seems decent. My plan is to continue with the cortisone treatments for as long as they'll continue to work.
I won't put my bride behind a snowblower. Kids & grandkids aren't exactly next door either, so this stubborn, 'Kantankerous Kraut' isn't ready to yet give up. Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Thursday, March 16, 2017 - 07:25 pm:

Marv...you need one of these.(the tractor...okay, maybe a runabout too!! ha ha). Far handier than "just a snowblower" and a lot more comfortable. It'll punch through a 3 foot snowdrift in half the time a snow blower will.


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