Running the Kingston 5 ball carburetor in the 1910

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Running the Kingston 5 ball carburetor in the 1910
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, March 05, 2017 - 01:37 pm:

This thing runs great! I can't wait until it stops raining enough to go for a drive. The Kingston five ball is called out on my car's build sheet, so it is a blessing that this one runs so well with the original Jacobson Brandow coil unit.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ecvy6wu_wCM&feature=em-upload_owner


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary London, Camarillo, CA on Sunday, March 05, 2017 - 02:34 pm:

Nice!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould, Folsom, CA on Sunday, March 05, 2017 - 03:27 pm:

Agree, great carbs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jem Bowkett, Spalding United Kingdom on Sunday, March 05, 2017 - 05:02 pm:

Oh you are making me jealous! Stan's got mine in his carb intensive care unit and I want to play with it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Sunday, March 05, 2017 - 07:41 pm:

Great coils, too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, March 05, 2017 - 07:56 pm:

RV did the coils. Bill Glass rebuilt the carburetor.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mitch Owen on Sunday, March 05, 2017 - 09:01 pm:

Those 5 balls are great when tuned correctly. I'm running one on my '10 and love it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George N. Lemperes on Sunday, March 05, 2017 - 11:48 pm:

I'm jealous! I've been trying to get one for the restoration of my '09 for 18 years!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alan George Long on Monday, March 06, 2017 - 06:00 am:

I have a 5 Ball but it has a threaded section instead if the
flanged 2 bolt pattern that the T uses. Stan reckons it could be off a Tractor or similar from the early 1900's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould, Folsom, CA on Monday, March 06, 2017 - 08:19 pm:

Royce, how does Bill do the valve? Not a Grose jet I assume.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Monday, March 06, 2017 - 08:43 pm:

It has a more recent Holley needle and seat.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould, Folsom, CA on Monday, March 06, 2017 - 09:19 pm:

Can't quite picture it but I guess the float arm somehow depresses the needle into the seat. I don't see how the needle is held steady, though. I am reminded how the original set up worked, the needle (with attached ball) being captured by the threaded hole in the float arm so that when it closed on the seat it was held in a vertical position.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Monday, March 06, 2017 - 10:55 pm:

I think Bill's system does about the same thing as the original design. The main thing is to have the weight of the float PULL the needle off it's seat rather than having the head pressure of the fuel PUSH it off. There is just not enough pressure to lift the needle if there is any stickiness to the fuel.

Somebody (not Bill) was doing them using a Tecumseh carburetor needle and seat and gluing the seat in with J B weld. The best thing about that system is that they are easy to get out and replace with something that works.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Monday, March 06, 2017 - 11:06 pm:

So I just got a PM asking how I do it. I should have a photo but I don't have time to look for one right now. It's no secret, I'm pretty sure I've posted it before.

I use two 3/16 hard brass balls on a brass stem.

I form the original seat with a forming tool, reduce the size of the lower ball until it will pass through the original arm, adjust the float height by moving the upper ball on the rod and lock it in place. That allows the same hollow nut to be used as the original system used and does not require any machine work in the bowl.

This system -- that I have been using for the past few years -- leaves the original arm as part of the system as opposed to replacing it and makes it easier to adjust the fuel level if necessary.

A picture would make it all make sense.

There are several systems used by other restorers that work fine, this is just what I designed. Bill's system works fine.


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