Setting valves KR Wilson method with Stipe Cam

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Setting valves KR Wilson method with Stipe Cam
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eubanks, Powell, TN on Wednesday, March 08, 2017 - 12:50 pm:

Would it make any difference setting the valves with the KR Wilson gauge if you have a Stipe 280 Cam?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan McEachern on Wednesday, March 08, 2017 - 02:55 pm:

Short answer- yes it will make a huge difference and simply won't work. The stipe cam lobe timing is totally different than a stock Ford cam. And to add to that, if you have aftermarket pistons with a different compression height than stock CI pistons, that will compound the issues further.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Wednesday, March 08, 2017 - 04:07 pm:

Ditto what Dan said. The KR Wilson method is a crutch for a cam that is unevenly worn. Using that method on a cam with all the lobes the same size will result in poor performance.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eubanks, Powell, TN on Wednesday, March 08, 2017 - 05:25 pm:

Thanks all, it does have modern alum. pistons which and not HC. I sort of figured it might not work because of cam timing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Glen Chaffin on Wednesday, March 08, 2017 - 08:25 pm:

The only thing you can do to improve a Stipe cam is to advance it 10 deg or at least 7.5 deg. .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Blake, Kansas City on Wednesday, March 08, 2017 - 09:47 pm:

This is the second time a post has referenced the K.R. Wilson tool, or the K.R. Wilson method for setting valves. IIRC, the first one gave some specifics about measuring piston travel or maybe height and using that to set tappett clearance. I don't think that is the full story.

Is there a link to the full procedure? It's hard for me to conceive ANY advantage for setting clearance. It sounds more like a method which amounts to a surrogate for ensuring the cam timing is correct, like using a degree wheel before degree wheels were widely available.

Thanks

GNB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Wednesday, March 08, 2017 - 10:10 pm:

Gary, here's a short vid on you-tube. Not sure how correct or not it is though.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8dxl8vjQzM


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Blake, Kansas City on Thursday, March 09, 2017 - 12:20 am:

I watched it. Worn cam, new cam, Stipe cam I still see no connection to setting proper clearance.

Valve clearance is intended to make allowance for thermal expansion of components when running at operating temperature, with some margin of error built in. That's why exhaust valve clearance is typically higher. An exhaust valve runs hotter and expands more. It's got nothing to do with piston position. Cam timing? Yes, clearance? no.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Glen Chaffin on Thursday, March 09, 2017 - 12:57 pm:

Setting valves by piston travel was an old procedure designed to compensate for a worn cam. No one would do this today unless you are cheap and do not want to buy a reground or new cam. Setting valves by piston travel had questionable good results and resulted in a very noisy engine because the valve gap became a big variable. Don't even consider it today.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Thursday, March 09, 2017 - 01:45 pm:

No one has talked about the fact that most blocks have been decked many times too. If you do use this method, use the one that uses the piston at the top of the stroke. Dan.


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