South Carolina

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: South Carolina
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Wilson on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 03:45 am:

New guy here, just wanting to introduce myself and my 1922 (based on the engine number) Model TT. I am a complete novice and am sure I will have plenty of questions. Anyone from South Carolina on here?





Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James G Fisher III Peachtree City, GA on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 07:57 am:

Hi Chris, and welcome.

Looks like you have quite an opportunity there. In not in SC but in GA and have allot of relatives in Hartwell on the border.

From experience I suggest you get a notebook and document all the history and dates you do things and take a ton of photos no mater how mundane the task. History adds to the emotional and physical value of T.

Again welcome and I look forward to seeing the progress. Dont get discouraged and the forum and the people on it are a resource beyond price.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 08:22 am:

Wow,looks like you have most if not all the parts!I started with just a chassis!
Just take your time and eat the elephant in small bites. You will be driving in no time.
You have the option of putting a electric starter and generator on there which is a good thing. Keep us posted.
BUT 1 word of advice! Go ahead and add a couple bays to the shed. They multiply. you wind up with a car or pickup to go along with it. The a few extra parts pile up and then it is "Um,I liked that speedster I saw on the net the other night".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 08:31 am:

Great looking TT. I hope you find whatever help you need here.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James M. Riedy, Sandusky, Ohio on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 08:37 am:

Chris, Did you purchase this or was it in your family? If it is an heirloom it would mean all the more to you to get it running. Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Wilson on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 08:53 am:

Mack - the shed you see in the picture is where the TT has been sitting for 20+ years. It is actually still sitting there till I can arrange to move it. I want to get it out of there soon as the shed it starting to fall apart.

James - It was given to me by my wife's grandmother. To her knowledge it was purchased new and has been in the family even since. She is not sure when it quit being used.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison - Rice, Minnesota on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 08:57 am:

Welcome Chris. It'll be nice to watch another one go back on the road. These old model ts have their own set of circumstances that take some learning. But you'll find year after year they become easier and easier to understand. Hopefully you'll find some local assistance. Stay close to the forum. There are literally thousands of years of accumulated knowledge here.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 09:14 am:

Howdy, Chris. As the old forum saying goes, welcome to the affliction. You came to the right place. This is a very active forum, with a lot of participants who have decades of Model T experience and expertise. I've been seriously into the Model T world for only nine years, and this has been a big source of what little I know.

The Model T and Model TT are relatively simple, but very different from most other vehicles. They contain some surprises which demonstrate that knowledge is power. Knowledge of what to expect when you dig in is the power to avoid expensive mistakes. That brings me to this link for folks who are new to the game.

http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG80.html

As others have said, take pictures and keep track of what goes where, and how things are put together. If you get stuck on something, don't worry. It's very likely you'll find the solution here.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eubanks, Powell, TN on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 09:25 am:

A non starter TT with the correct mag horn still on the firewall. 23 up front axle spring mounting and 26-7 wires on the front. Interesting combination.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Kiefer - Adams, MN on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 09:44 am:

The first thing I would do is go to grandma's house and go through her photo albums and find as many photos as possible of that T. Congratulations on your new old car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Wilson on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 09:50 am:

Jim - The original front wheels are still there, they are just sitting beside the truck.

I am curious as to the date of the truck. The engine serial number would indicate a manufacture date of August 1922, but the engine block looks to be cast with a 23 on it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Wilson on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 09:51 am:

Dean - It sounds like most of the old family photos were lost in a house fire many years ago unfortunately.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 09:58 am:

The discrepancy in dates suggests a replacement block. Replacement engines came with serial numbers, but bare blocks were sold unnumbered and were to be stamped with the numbers of the engines they replaced.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 10:06 am:

This is so late in 1922 that there weren't any engines with two valve covers anymore. They were the last USA built T engines with casting dates, so the 23 might be a mold number or something else. The 1923 model year didn't start until September 1922, so your TT would be considered a late '22 :-)

Jim - the front spring/engine mount style shifted in 1921, so the only thing we can see that is modernized would be the '26/'27 front wheels.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Wilson on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 11:24 am:

Thanks for all the info already! Here are a few more photos for anyone interested.






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 11:45 am:

Chris,

I must ask - Are you planning to restore it or rehab the running/safety items and preserve the "patina"?

Also, it does not appear to have an auxiliary transmission nor auxiliary brakes. Until you get further into it, it's reasonable to think it probably has low speed rear end gears (most TT's do), which means you'll have trouble breaking 20 MPH with a tail wind. So, in addition to the advice given above, I suggest you educate yourself about power, speed, brakes, etc. before you go too far with it. You may choose to make some changes for practical reasons that you're not even aware of yet. You'll be able to get all the information and varying opinions you need right here on this forum.

You'll certainly get various opinions as many of us are a little opinionated, but it's a really great truck and you should proceed in whatever manner you prefer. All I'm saying is consider the options first, then proceed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 11:58 am:

Nothing good can come from this. You know that, don't you ? Is it too
late to say "no" ?

I am pretty sure those tires are gonna need some air. You will want to
determine the exact date of manufacture and then consult with some of
the purists to make sure you get the right vintage air.

So sorry to hear this happened to you. Just say no to old trucks ! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Wilson on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 12:04 pm:

Henry - I am thinking of rehab at the moment. Being a novice, I don't want to get too far over my head right from the start. Plus I have a new baby on the way, so time will be an issue. Eventually I would like to restore it and add auxiliary brakes and a high speed rear.

Burger - Yeah seems like I am going to be jumping down the rabbit hole. I already have plenty of hobbies, so this will be competing for both time and money. My wife is just thrilled.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 12:15 pm:

Keeping your wife happy is important. Keeping your pregnant wife happy is CRITICAL!! Glad to hears he is " thrilled"! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 12:21 pm:

Chris, some guys have all the luck. Very cool truck. Dont mind the wife,she will come around. Thats what I keep telling myself. I am getting ready to dive into rebuilding a wood cab truck. I would love to see some detailed photos of entire cab construction.
Burger is probably right. You are poisoned for life. May as well get it on the road and poison the minds of others. As others have said, the forum is the go to for any questions. Look forward to watching progress.
Drive safe and often


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 01:23 pm:

Chris be sure to look for a tag on the cab from the maker.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 02:01 pm:

One thing you have going for you, is that it's from the Wife's family! That should keep you out of the doghouse! What a great family piece!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, March 10, 2017 - 11:27 pm:

Family heirloom antique cars are very special indeed. Whether your, or your wife's family, they give an added connection to history and heritage.
I look forward to more and better pictures of the body. Nice original wooden bodies are rare. The more of the original body you can preserve or restore, the better.
As for the rest of it? I would be of the opinion that it is rusty beyond "patina", and should be restored. This does not mean it has to be done right now. Fix the mechanics, wheels and tires. Get it running and drivable. Enjoy it a little bit, then decide what long-term course of action you want to go with it.
Neat truck!!! I like what I see, and think it would be a wonderful project.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Kiefer - Adams, MN on Saturday, March 11, 2017 - 10:40 am:

Chris, you are lucky the same way as I. Our 14 Touring was purchased new by my wife's grandparents. She wanted it fixed so bad she went out and got a part time job to pay for the parts. If it were my grandparents T it would still be a meaningless pile of rust.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Doolittle on Saturday, March 11, 2017 - 01:22 pm:

Chris- there is an active club in s. c. Go to mtfca.com. --- chapters---- South Carolina. Many members. Contact the pres. there might be a member nearby.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nicholas Lingg - Tarboro, NC on Saturday, March 11, 2017 - 02:04 pm:

Also check the HCCA


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Sunday, March 12, 2017 - 08:43 pm:

Chris,

As John mentioned there is an active MTFCA/MTFCI chapter in SC. There are several members in the Lexington area if I recall correctly which is not that far from you. Their web site is: http://www.scmodeltford.org/contact/ and a better contact information is listed at: http://www.mtfca.com/clubpages/chapters.htm#sc -- Where Susan is listed -- in Lexington -- about 12-13 miles from your area?

There is also Smith & Jones Antique Auto Parts near the airport in Columbia, SC -- their web site is http://www.snjparts.com/ and they are active supports of the local chapter (both T & the A one).

Looks promising. Be sure to measure the garage opening before you roll the tuck in. Some garage doors and some of the electric garage door openers are little low for a T or TT to fit under. One TT owner had a set of very small front wheels he would put on to get it in and out of the low door on his garage.

The photo of the wood in the truck cab also looks promising. It appears the shed gave it the protection so the roof didn't disappear.

Be sure to check the engine & transmission for deposits. The TT that I once owned had been used by a small boy to put sand and small rocks in the oil breather. Gave the boy something to do....

On the other side of the coin, my Dad purchased a T from a junkyard once. The engine was frozen but after pulling the plugs and soaking the cylinders for several weeks (he used kerosene back then -- but penetrating oil -- see: http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=59511 would be my recommendation today). He actually got it running and it was in usable shape. More often -- they were parked for some mechanical reason. You might want to ask if they know if it was parked because a replacement truck was obtained or if it died and a replacement truck had to be obtained.

I'm over in Sumter SC so a littler further away. But a T is relatively easy to work on.

DO NOT TOW the T -- except for very very short distances. And then at very slow speed, and with the car in gear (and then only if the engine turns over freely, has oil etc.) See the posting at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/708324/734277.html for what happens when the T is towed without the engine turning over. And with the tires on the truck it looks like a car trailer will be the answer.

From several of the photos it appears the truck has the original wooden firewall and even has the dimming coil for the headlamps still attached to the firewall. That is the metal object above the horn with the electrical wires running to it.

Good luck with your project. And by all means contact the local club they are wealth of information and help.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Golden on Friday, March 17, 2017 - 08:05 am:

A friend had an earlier Model T with a casting date that is a few months later than the serial number indicates.

The only conclusion we could draw was that the early replacement engine blocks were sent without any number stamped in them.

The Ford dealership was sold a set of stamps and told to stamp the same number in the new replacement block that was on the old block.

Perhaps the original engine engine failed early and the dealer replaced it, perhaps while still under warrantee, if there was one, with a new block and stamped the same serial number in that block.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, March 17, 2017 - 09:51 am:

James - you are correct about replacement blocks, but there were no casting dates on US made Model T engine blocks after the spring of 1922, so the "23" on the block in this case isn't the casting year.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Wilson on Thursday, April 27, 2017 - 06:13 pm:

Small update. The TT is still there in the shed thankfully. Those photos were taken 3 years ago and no one has been back there since then, so I wasn't sure what I would find. I was greeted by a small pine forrest that had completely grown around the shed blocking all access. Took a few hours and several gallons of sweat, but I cleared it out enough to be able to remove the truck. Should get it home next week!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Thursday, April 27, 2017 - 06:23 pm:

Thanks for the update. Still looking forward to more photos!
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


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