Devastating news-- a wake up reminder

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Devastating news-- a wake up reminder
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ross Benedict - Calgary, Alberta on Sunday, March 12, 2017 - 07:50 pm:

One of our local car collectors has lost his entire life's work to a devastating fire. Let it be a reminder to be diligent with oil, gas, paints and any other flammable.
http://globalnews.ca/news/3301923/devastating-fire-destroys-barn-full-of-antique -cars-worth-millions-north-of-olds/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Sunday, March 12, 2017 - 07:58 pm:

If you have a sizable amount of chemicals, you should store your paints, thinners, and flammables out in a storage shed, away frpm your garage or main structure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Sunday, March 12, 2017 - 08:06 pm:

In a metal cabinet of any type is best. I keep 90% of my chemicals in an old filing cabinet. Its better than them being out. Its the 10% that are out in the shop that I worry about sometimes.

And of course a separate building as Ed said is also a good idea, just not always feasible.

At work we have self closing cabinets that hold chemicals. The will hold back or contain a fire. But when it comes to flammable objects, once the flash point is reached by direct flame or not, it wont matter.

I hope he had insurance on at least some of that collection. Looks like some truly unique items were lost.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Sunday, March 12, 2017 - 08:19 pm:

Totally no insurance. Not only the monitary value ,the history lost is terrible.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip thompson on Sunday, March 12, 2017 - 08:38 pm:

I hate to hear about the loss. I think it is also a good practice to understand plug stuff like cheap drop lights. Philip


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip thompson on Sunday, March 12, 2017 - 08:40 pm:

I hate to hear about the loss. I think it is also a good practice to unplug stuff like cheap drop lights. Philip


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Sunday, March 12, 2017 - 08:46 pm:

We had the misfortune of losing our house to a fire about 22 years ago. It was a total loss. Years of family heirlooms, my model T accessory collection up till that time.(about 500 items) and everything else we owned. At the time I estimated about $86,000 loss not covered by insurance. All lost in less than 2 hours. I was lucky that the shop did not burn, or I would have lost my first Model T and the 1908 Reliable Dayton Highwheeler. So after going thru that we have lots of separate buildings that my "toys" are stored in. Any one building burning today, would be bad, but I would not lose it all. I feel for this man, He will be living with the fire for a very, very, long time. :-( But, thank God no one was hurt, The stuff lost is just stuff. but I do not know how I could have dealt with someone being hurt in our fire.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Monday, March 13, 2017 - 01:43 pm:

I was a fire investigator for a good number of years and many fires were caused from things you would never think of. In a barn where incandescent lights are used birds will build nests over the light bulbs and when the lights are turned on in the fall after being off all summer fires will frequently occur. Dust collected on light bulbs over time will ignite when the light is energized and the dust particles will fall to the floor and ignite combustible material. Mineral oil and rags will not ignite the oil has to be vegetable and mixed with an oxadizer such as bleach and the temperature elevated somewhat. Usually it involves cotton or linen, linen is made from the flax plant, linen is Latin for flax.

Magnification of the sun and chemical mismatches are some factors that go on unnoticed. Rodents chewing energized conductors and heat sources too close to combustibles. Many fires are of a seasonal nature, summer time usually involve barbeques, magnification of the sun, birds nests, cleaning chemicals, friction from machinery to name a few. Winter fires are frequently over heated heating appliances and/or too close to combustibles. In shops, welding is not common however there are a few per year, local regulations require a 30 minute fire watch after any welding operations (this is rarely done). I don't know the cause of the Olds fire but a thorough investigator asking the right questions can determine at least a most probable cause if not the cause. Being cautious helps but not always. Pyrolysis is a common cause that escapes many investigators.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Monday, March 13, 2017 - 01:56 pm:

This is why my shops are all steel construction with in floor heating with the boiler in a separate building. Yes it costs a little more up front but worth the increased peace of mind


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Warren on Tuesday, March 14, 2017 - 11:54 pm:

The neighbor had a fire in there garage caused by them putting a 4X8 piece of plywood against a wall but on an extension cord, the weight of the plywood finally shorted the cord and caused the fire. Luckily someone was home and got it put out before it burned the whole house. My heart goes out to you that have lost things in a fire.


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