Pretty doesn't mean safe

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Pretty doesn't mean safe
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Butler on Tuesday, March 14, 2017 - 05:26 pm:

One thing we learn very early with restoration is that we have to go backward to go forward. Some time ago while stopping on a steep hill at a stoplight, the pinon gear snapped and punctured the axle housing leaving me rolling toward a 5 lane road. (Yes I remember now that is what the emergency brake is for). In a moment of controlled panic I turned right much harder than i would have liked to avoid traffic.

Suffice it to say that my beautiful front left wheel was no longer concave (front wheels being dished) but rather was convex but did not break.

It has been over 20 years since we restored it so this time, I am stripping off the beautiful black paint and soon they are off to Stutzman Wheel Shop for a remake.

It is hard to take something finished and start over, but I am not really ready to die today.front 15T wheels


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Tuesday, March 14, 2017 - 05:35 pm:

Good point David. Its a reminder that these T's we love to restore and drive are still fragile compared to todays cars. When we begin to drive and treat them like we do our modern vehicles its not good for us and the T's we drive. And most importantly US.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Barrett in Auburn Ca. on Tuesday, March 14, 2017 - 05:54 pm:

David, glad you are OK. The model T can be fixed. Wouldn't this be a good time to think about some auxiliary brakes?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Eddie on Tuesday, March 14, 2017 - 06:02 pm:

What where your spokes made of? they don't look that old in the picture


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Butler on Tuesday, March 14, 2017 - 06:42 pm:

They are hickory and actually very old. It took collecting a pretty extensive number of wheels from the right age to construct them as it was done in our garage and not by a professional. Zooming in on them you will see that they have been filled and the felloe was shimmed to fit tight on the rim. It is interesting what you find when you work on one thing. Removing the right front wheel today for preparation, I discovered the inner bear was actually turning on the spindle rather than in the bearing. It is too soon to know but it may require a spindle replacement. I am going to have to do some measuring as there were some very subtle changes to the hubs as well as the spindles as i remember it. If I was a betting man, I suspect the right spindle is accurate to the '15 but with the newer bearings installed caused the castle nut to not tighten as far as it would have on the later spindles. Just another reminder of good inspection and maintenance.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Butler on Tuesday, March 14, 2017 - 06:48 pm:

And, yes Erik, being a bit of a "purist" AC brakes are in my future.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Tuesday, March 14, 2017 - 07:39 pm:

David...re: I suspect the right spindle is accurate to the '15 but with the newer bearings installed caused the castle nut to not tighten as far as it would have on the later spindles.--- Were you by any chance using the stock spindle washer? They're thicker, when you use the newer bearings in the earlier spindles, you have to get the thinner spindle washer. That'll allow you to get the castle nut on tighter/further and also get the cotter pin better/easier.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, March 14, 2017 - 08:21 pm:

I would get rid of that primer. Here's why. I primed my rims and hubs just like that before sending them to Stutzman. I received my new wheels and a couple of weeks ago I painted them. When I tried to mount the too-small tires (that's another story) I found that the tire irons easily knocked off the paint and left blotches of primer showing. The paint with primer under it was extremely delicate.


It was easy to scrape off paint and leave primer showing with just a fingernail.

I masked the wood with Gorilla tape, sandblasted the paint and primer off the metal parts, and repainted with primerless appliance epoxy enamel.

I would blast the primer off those parts and (1) use a primerless paint on them, or (2) treat them with metal prep and leave them unpainted until the wheels are assembled, and then use the primerless paint.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Barrett in Auburn Ca. on Tuesday, March 14, 2017 - 09:10 pm:

David, good choice as the modern "Rocky Mtn" brakes are a copy of the old A.C. brakes and can be installed without modification to model T parts. Just be aware they don't work worth a $&#T going backwards.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Tuesday, March 14, 2017 - 09:29 pm:

I agree with primerless paint. The Valspar primerless worked well on my wheel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Tuesday, March 14, 2017 - 11:13 pm:

Why not use black primer if you want to prime
But I found motor enamel works best buy it in qt cans and spray it on.
I must be buying the wrong Clintcher tires as if it's not on in 25 mins or less it's time for another beer
Totaly agree on AC brakes of any make but never was a big fan of rockies


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Alexander in Albion, Maine on Wednesday, March 15, 2017 - 07:08 pm:

Just a thought..........to avoid the problem of beating up the paint on newly painted wheels or rims I made my "tire irons" out of oak. About
1 1/4" wide, 1/4" thick and 18" long. Beveled at each end and well sanded. I mounted 5 model T tires and 5 model A tires. And like the old cleanser " Bon Ami " they have'nt scratched yet. I will admit tho' that they are pretty well used up and I'll have to make new ones for next time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Martin Vowell, Sylmar, CA on Thursday, March 16, 2017 - 02:26 am:

Steve, you should've used the plastic bad method...worked for me real well and I didn't mar my rims as all. :-)


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