Another new web page

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Another new web page
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, March 15, 2017 - 11:30 pm:

Recently the subject of front end alignment came up. I had some pictures of the tool I made for it, so I put them on a new web page. Being able to post a link on a particular subject saves me having to retype the same thing every time a recurring question comes up.

http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG104.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Wednesday, March 15, 2017 - 11:38 pm:

Thanks, Steve. _Nicely done (as usual).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Allen - Conroe, TX on Wednesday, March 15, 2017 - 11:50 pm:

Thanks for taking the time to create web pages like this.

I've looked through all of your pages and they've made my introduction to T's much easier and more enjoyable.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Thursday, March 16, 2017 - 12:04 am:

Looks good, excellent craftsmanship.

While not ideal like this tool, might an adjustable shower rod achieve the same result?

https://www.lowes.com/pd/Style-Selections-72-in-Brushed-Nickel-Adjustable-Shower -Curtain-Rod/4764534


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, March 16, 2017 - 12:27 am:

I see two problems with the shower rod. At 72" it's way too long to fit between the wheels. You would have to add the set screw to lock it in place to hold the measurement.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Thursday, March 16, 2017 - 12:30 am:

Thanks Steve, very helpful indeed. Although i went through my front end and replaced everything that was loose and of dubious nature, i still need to go back to it again this Spring due to some uneven front tire wear. I thought i read somewhere here that roadsters when driven mostly without a passenger can have this happen. Anyone else here experience this?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, March 16, 2017 - 02:44 am:

Steve - Might be that I make too big of a deal about this, but rather than jack the front wheels off of the garage floor to check and adjust toe-in, I roll the car forward at least a couple feet and then block a rear wheel, being extremely careful not to let the car roll back at all,....not even a fraction of an inch. THEN, I measure the difference between distance between rear of front wheel rims and front of front wheel rims to determine toe-in. The idea being that unless all steering gear, wheel bearings, etc. is absolutely tight an perfect, the actual toe-in when the car is actually rolling forward just might be different than when the car is stationary with front wheels up off of the ground. Does this make sense, or again, am I making too much of this? FWIW,..... harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, March 16, 2017 - 02:47 am:

Steve - Might be that I make too big of a deal about this, but rather than jack the front wheels off of the garage floor to check and adjust toe-in, I roll the car forward at least a couple feet and then block a rear wheel, being extremely careful not to let the car roll back at all,....not even a fraction of an inch. THEN, I measure the difference between distance between rear of front wheel rims and front of front wheel rims to determine toe-in. The idea being that unless all steering gear, wheel bearings, etc. is absolutely tight an perfect, the actual toe-in when the car is actually rolling forward just might be different than when the car is stationary with front wheels up off of the ground. Does this make sense, or again, am I making too much of this? FWIW,..... harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, March 16, 2017 - 02:49 am:

Oops! Sorry for the double post!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Thursday, March 16, 2017 - 06:07 am:

Steve,

Thanks for taking the time to illustrate how it can be done. It will be helpful to lots of folks that haven't aligned the front end a few times before.

I suspect your tool is a lot sturdier than some alternatives. In my case I don't check the toe in that often so I normally just use 2 yard sticks held together with 2 very small one inch C-clamps. Probably not as accurate but seems to have worked ok. And your recommendation to check it in 4 places to compensate for any wheel run-out is a good tip. I also liked your "white stands" you used to hold the rod.

Again, thank you for adding that to your site and all your support to our hobby.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Thursday, March 16, 2017 - 09:09 am:

Strange as it may sound, I use two yardsticks, coupla small clamps and a tape measure. First I set the wheels "straight as can be", mark front and back of tires on the inside at halfway up point. Take two yardsticks and I usually "measure" the back side first by holding them up to my marks, then clamp 'em. Measure that distance, record it 'cause I'll forget what it was. Then I do the same with the front. Compare recordings and adjust accordingly. This isn't necessarily "accurately spot-on" but pretty dang close, and very simple. Actually I've got my 3 T's within tolerance this way.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Thursday, March 16, 2017 - 11:18 am:

I use a carpenters framing square. I place some masking tape on the wheel at the point where the square touches the tire at the front of the wheel with the other side of the square on a flat floor. I make a mark at a point in the center of the tire and measure the distance from one wheel to the other with the wheels on the ground. I then roll the car so that the tape is in line with the square at the back of the wheel and measure the distance between. That way you will not get a false reading from a crooked wheel. If you measure from felloe to felloe, you will not get as accurate a measurement.

Tow (gather) and castor are the most important measurements. Camber will not change unless something is bent.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Sean Butler Huntington Beach, CA on Thursday, March 16, 2017 - 12:46 pm:

Steve: It seems you have typed "Being able to post a link on a particular subject saves me having to retype the same thing every time a recurring question comes up." quite a few times.


Seriously though, we all appreciate the time you put into producing your web pages. Another job well done, sir!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Thursday, March 16, 2017 - 01:00 pm:

Thanks Steve, for not just doing the work on your own T's but maintaining a website and Youtube channel for us newbies.

If it helps, one of your pics won't load for me. It's whatever you have posted immediately before, "Adjusting gather (toe-in) is rather simple."


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