Which state has the most model t's?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Which state has the most model t's?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Saturday, March 18, 2017 - 12:24 pm:

So what is the densest model T territory?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, March 18, 2017 - 01:20 pm:

The question is worded incorrectly.

This involves a state of mind, and in this case, it looks pretty grim.

Just say "NO!" to old rusty junk ! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Saturday, March 18, 2017 - 02:30 pm:

To answer your question Ignacio I think Texas has a bunch.
Growing up in Central Texas and going to farm auctions years ago I saw a LOT of T frames, parts and T bodies.
Still see a few T remains in the local salvage yard in piles of junk before going to the crusher.

Must be a lot of T's in Texas that are restored in various ways. I have 3 and have been thinning down my parts. I'm sure there are folks that have more cars and parts than I do in Texas.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, March 18, 2017 - 05:34 pm:

A question that has been asked many times before. Never been adequately answered, and probably never will be.
There are many reasons why it will never likely be answered. First, one needs to clarify the question. Complete cars? How complete, how correct, together or apart, running? Does it have to be a "from the original days" survivor, or put together from pieces? And from how many pieces of how many cars? Licensed, and registered?

Then, there are a couple ways to count how many. Per capita? Total in a given state or region? Or relative to the size of the state?

Registration itself makes it difficult to count. Many states did not register cars at all until recent decades, and some still do not keep records of cars beyond a certain age.
Most states do not have accurate records going back more than a few years. Any car not currently being driven (probably more than half the surviving intact cars) are not in any readily accessible public record.
Many model T owners do not belong to any clubs, local or national, so will not be listed in any club rosters. On top of that, Most people that own multiple model Ts do not list all of them in the rosters, for a variety of reasons.

I think both Texas and Califunny are solid contenders, either way you want to count it. Colorado, Minnesota, and Missouri all have a lot relative to their size. So do Oregon and Washington.
Califunny has about 25 local model T clubs. About half of them are fairly large and active with tours and meets often. The Santa Clara Valley Model T Ford Club puts on two major invitational meets every year, and has been known to have nearly a hundred model Ts at a single event. Their membership has been about a hundred member families nearly every year for a decade or more, and most members have more than one model T Ford.
There are a lot of them out there, still.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Saturday, March 18, 2017 - 08:32 pm:

Maybe way off base, but I'd think the current Model T population wouldn't stray too far from the number sold in a given state. A rough estimate might be half of a state's automobile registration in 1925, comparison would give you the state with the most Ts in all conditions.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Saturday, March 18, 2017 - 08:45 pm:

A few years ago, I phoned Hagerty Insurance to ask how many Model T Fords they had enrolled. _A few taps on the computer turned up an approximate five-thousand, including hot-rods. _I would imagine they could also give you a state by state breakdown and though not conclusive, it'd give you a pretty close idea. _They have a concierge service for this kind of thing. _Very nice of them to provide that service.

I read somewhere that there are 250,000 Flivvers worldwide, including everything from pristine restorations to rust deposits that barely cast a shadow; and of these, 60,000 reasonably intact units are in the United States. _I wish I could substantiate that with a source, but I can't, and so, also can't speak for the accuracy of such estimates. _Anyway, those are the numbers I quote to spectators at car shows 'cause, well... it's the best I can do. _The know-nothing newbie always welcomes correction.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Saturday, March 18, 2017 - 09:01 pm:

Interesting. When I search for license plates of the era, you find a ton of PA and MA. Other northeast states. I don't think I've ever seen a TX one.
Now, that's registered T's back in the day, not current registered T's. Perhaps state affiliate club memberhip roles?

Yes, state vehicle registrations would be a crapshoot.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Perry Goble on Saturday, March 18, 2017 - 09:29 pm:

One reason you don't find early Texas plates is , the state only started state plates in 1917 . Then you keep your large plate and added a small radiator plate until 1922 . After that the state had a new plate each year.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Saturday, March 18, 2017 - 09:30 pm:

Here in north Georgia I don't see ever see them.... I know there must be some around. Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek Brookshire, Texas on Saturday, March 18, 2017 - 09:32 pm:

I was told by a older fellow years ago that much of the scrap metal collected for the war effort and sent to allies, including boat loads of Model T's, was sent predominantly out of the Port of New Orleans and since rail traffic was reserved for more important supplies most of the scrap metal was sourced from the Deep South.
Don't know how true the story may be.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, March 18, 2017 - 09:36 pm:

Has everyone forgot the work Tony Cimorelle [Spelling opt] did with his listings?? I think Michigan was on top with Ill a very close second??Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Klemmer on Saturday, March 18, 2017 - 09:53 pm:

When we designed the new light system for greenfield village remodel about 12 years ago, and went to see the first ones cast, I wandered back behind the foundry with some folks from the village and there was a pile of engine blocks, many of them Model t and a, that were being recycled into new poles and bases. Somewhere I have a photo of the stack.
That was pretty neat to see.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthony J. Marino - League City, Texas on Sunday, March 19, 2017 - 10:25 am:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/6/1204.html?1042151079

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/331880/402706.html?1385027513


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Sunday, March 19, 2017 - 12:47 pm:

The Model T Ford Club International made a roster several years ago by state,year,and body style.These were a quality hardcover book and expensive so there was a lot of bitching about the price and i'm sure they quit.I haven't seen mine in at least 10 years! Bud.


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