Front radius rod attachment?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Front radius rod attachment?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Sunday, March 19, 2017 - 11:51 pm:

Hi, I have my front steering gear bolted on and wheels on. The radius rod ball is about an inch short. I've tried getting the weight off of the front and onto the frame but that still didn't do much. I know the front steering gear needs to be angled backward more so the front radius rod ball goes into the socket but I am not sure how to do that under the circumstances?

I don't have brakes or the ability to chock the rear wheels because the rear differential is currently off. If I push it too hard from the front it will take it off the rear jack stands. One solution is to just wait until I have the rear diff on and brakes so it won't move easily but then what?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, March 20, 2017 - 01:27 am:

Maybe you can force the front axle and thus the radius rod ball back with ratchet straps until it fits in its socket?
Another way is to loosen the front engine mount/front spring mount while fastening the radius rod ball, then tighten up the spring again.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Monday, March 20, 2017 - 10:27 am:

I like Rogers's second idea!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Wilson - Omaha NE on Monday, March 20, 2017 - 04:38 pm:

I just did this Sunday with a ratchet strap. But I was only about 1/2" short. I looped it around the back axle, and hooked it to the front axle. It only took a few ratchet's to draw it into place, really not that much pressure. The ball just slipped into place on it's own.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Barker, Somerset, England on Monday, March 20, 2017 - 04:45 pm:

I'm a bit worried that you may not have the correct radius rod. Late cars (26-7) had a shorter one to allow for the flatter spring and lower ride height. You certainly must retain an adequate castor angle (lean-back of the axle). Pulling the radius rods back will tend to reduce the castor angle. Has this rod been on this car before?
Is the spring properly seated in the crossmember so it is at right-angles to the frame when viewed from the side?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Monday, March 20, 2017 - 05:01 pm:

I will have to replace the wishbone mounting cap on my '21 before I drive it. It has a homemade (not by me) cap with mis-matched bolts in it now. I have already bought the cap, studs, nuts, and safety wire. I will be concerned if the ball on the wishbone does not fit right into the socket. It doesn't seem like there should be any pressure on the ball and socket in any direction.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Monday, March 20, 2017 - 05:22 pm:

According to the October 1927 price list of parts, the under style wishbone 2733B is the same for all years that used that style. There is not a different wishbone listed for 1926-27.

It's easier to install the ball into the cap if the car is down on all fours and you push the car forward with the front tires chocked. You can also jack up the wishbone just in front of the ball to push the ball up into the socket.

Wait until you get the rear end back on. In the mean time, it's not going to hurt anything if the wishbone is not connected.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Monday, March 20, 2017 - 06:23 pm:

Ignacio, Tommy mentioned something very important. Once everything is together, be sure to safety wire the two studs together instead of using cotter pins.

If you use cotter pins, the studs and cotter pinned nuts can still back out of the threads in the socket.

When I bought my '24, the previous owner had cotter pinned them and one of them had backed out about three full turns. Luckily, I caught it in time. :-)

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/411944/473702.html?1409007830


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Thursday, March 23, 2017 - 01:35 am:

Fortunately the bolts and nuts for the ball are in poor condition, no wire, no cotters, only double springs and corrosion holding it together. Like my first marriage. So I bought the kit from Lang's which gives you a strong hint as it comes with enough wire in the zip-loc to do the job.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Barker, Somerset, England on Thursday, March 23, 2017 - 10:12 am:

Erik is correct in saying that the wishbone part number did not change, but I checked a collection of about 20 post-1919 wishbones and there were definitely two lengths. My 26 had the longer one, and too much castor angle. It is now correct with the shorter variety.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, March 23, 2017 - 11:21 am:

Chris, it's odd if you have found any under style wishbones for 1926/27 in England? By 1925 and until the end of production English production used the drop frame chassis with a new and stronger over the axle wishbone in combination with special perches and a lowered front axle:

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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John T. Tannehill III, Hot Coffee, MS on Thursday, March 23, 2017 - 10:14 pm:

Appears the wishbone is attached to the axle the wrong way for a 26/7


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Sunday, March 26, 2017 - 01:01 am:

So the radius rod is back on using a tow strap and a come along wrapped around the differential as suggested by John Tannehill. So how tight do I put the castle nuts on? The spring and the hole drilled in the stud suggests that it should not be tightened as far as it can go, that it should only be below the hole like a normal castle nut?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Sunday, March 26, 2017 - 01:55 am:

Since Ford put a couple of springs there, he wanted the cap to have some flexibility, just not so much that the ball can come out. So I tighten until the springs are fully compressed, then loosen a couple of turns and wire the nuts together so the studs can't unscrew.

Check if you have any play there - if there is, you can file the cap or make a cup shaped shim out of copper / brass.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Sunday, March 26, 2017 - 08:29 pm:

Those fat springs are stiff, as long as the cap is tight, then springs are compressed enough. Wire the nuts, as Roger posted. Don't use cotters here!

Be sure to grease the ball and socket before fitting.





(Message edited by Dan_Treace on March 26, 2017)


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