Tractor conversion steel wheels on front PART 2

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Tractor conversion steel wheels on front PART 2
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Strickling on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 - 11:22 am:

So I am looking at my full length, probably un altered axle and the holes for the king pins appear to be parallel. I put long dowel rods in them and the dowels are parallel. So the new question is......Where is camber created ? Is it at the king ins or built in to the spindles?

thanks again.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Strickling on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 - 11:44 am:

I found this. It looks like it is in the spindles.
What does that really mean? Well if we have a properly aligned axle and spindles then the pre 1926 cars will have 3 inches of camber and the 1926-27 cars have 1 15/16 inches. But what if the axle is bent a little and the camber is off? Then bending the axle to restore the proper camber should work. Or better yet taking the axle off and making sure it is properly aligned. All the holes in the axles are parallel to one another (see the diagram earlier in the postings).

Note we have a lot of good information in this thread for front axle alignment etc. if anyone has something else to add please do so. Then we can refer folks to here for the information.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap Tucker 1915 Model T Ford touring cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Saggese on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 - 01:03 pm:

There are 3 things that are important to the front axle geometry: Camber, Caster, and Toe.

Camber is set by the spindles, as you have found. This is so that the contact patch of the tire is underneath the kingpin axis- for ease of steering. To adjust, you would need to bend the axle ends relative to the perch holes. You likely will not have to adjust this unless you are doing something custom. If the spindles are busted- get another set.

Caster is the angle that the entire axle leans back. This is for a self-centering action. Caster can be adjusted with a large wrench, pulling or pushing the axle while it is in the car. It bends the wishbone attachment points.

Toe is the angle that the wheels make when viewed from the top. This is to help the wheels track straight. Toe can be adjusted by adjusting the length of the tie rod. If the axle is bent inward or outward, this would affect toe.

Proper specs and adjustment procedures are found in the service manual.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Strickling on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 - 01:35 pm:

It is custom and I need ZERO camber. The axle will be cut shortened and welded back so that the spindles have a common center. Thanks all


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 - 04:09 pm:

Tom - concur. And honestly, with steel wheels operating at the average doodlebug speed 5-7 MPH (at least that's the speed mine are comfortable at), none of the normal considerations for a road car are really that critical; you won't notice it in the ride.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Strickling on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 - 07:29 pm:

I am concerned about 100 year old implement wheels not sitting flat. If I was using rubber it wouldn't matter to me, BUT I think I would still like straight up and down even with the rubber. I just think it would look cool.
Thanks to all for facts and opinions.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 - 07:36 pm:

Oh boy - I cannot wait to see pictures of this as you put it together!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Zachary Carrico on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 - 07:48 pm:

I get that steel wheels have no give thus removing the camber would allow them to be square to the ground but the ground is rarely very flat it's self and most ground will have some give. The only reason I see to worry too much about zero camber is if you will have some reason to be on asphalt or concrete which gives a pretty bad feeling ride.
-I'm not really trying to talk you out of removing the camber, if you are planning on shortening it anyway but I wouldn't spend too much time fretting it either. -Just some thoughts for whatever it is worth.

Here is the front of mine from the day it came home -sorry it is not square on to really show the camber.





Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration