Newbie. Got it running but the exhaust manifold is red hot...

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Newbie. Got it running but the exhaust manifold is red hot...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Martin on Monday, March 27, 2017 - 09:56 pm:

Some kind advice please... Got a 1915 at an auction last week. Ran when parked.;) (it's my first Model T) Replaced the fuel & it started on the first crank. Started but did not run "well"... coughed & sputtered and when I ran it for about 3 minutes, the exhaust manifold started getting red hot. I suppose it's the mixture or timing but don't know where to start.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Lynn on Monday, March 27, 2017 - 10:01 pm:

I would guess that the spark advance was off in some way, may be also that the carburetor fuel mixture is to lean. Lots of knowledgeable guys here will chime in I am sure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Schrepfer on Monday, March 27, 2017 - 10:08 pm:

Did you pull down the lever on left had side of steering after you got it running?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Monday, March 27, 2017 - 11:20 pm:

Another contributing factor may be a too-lean mixture.
Turn the knob counter-clockwise to richen.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Noel D. Chicoine, MD, Pierre, SD on Monday, March 27, 2017 - 11:28 pm:

Need to pull the lever on the left side of the steering wheel down halfway or more. After starting, the spark needs to be advanced to fire before top dead center. To start it you need to push that lever up to retard the spark to fire AFTER top dead center. If you don't you risk a broken starter or worse, a broken arm.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 07:46 am:

Yep. Read up on how to set the timing. No telling what a previous owner has done. You need to make sure that when the lever is all the way up, it fire just after TDC. The book says 15 degrees ATDC. I don't worry too much about exactly how many degrees, but it HAS to be AFTER or else it's dangerous. Once you know that part is right, then crank with the lever up and then pull it down after it starts. This is all assuming you are starting on battery, not magneto. Starting on magneto is a little different, but the initial adjustments I mentioned are the same either way.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 08:06 am:

Many T's, maybe most these days, start easier on BAT than on MAG, so do it that way.

Here's how to set timing: http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG97.html.

Start on BAT with the spark lever fully up. As soon as the car starts, move the lever down at least .

The stock carburetor for 1915 is a Holley G, but many are wearing a Holley NH. With either one, the initial setting is the same. Close the spray needle adjustment (clockwise) gently so as to not damage the end of the the needle. Then open it 1 to 1 turns. With the engine running open it some more until the engine starts to "stumble" then turn it back the other way to where it starts to stumble again. Open it back up to halfway between the two stumble points.

If you still get a red manifold, come back and report, because something else is going on.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willis Jenkins on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 08:26 am:

Tom,

I can't help but wonder if there is some kind of exhaust blockage? I would check for that as well. Who knows how long it has been sitting? Maybe a nest in there?

Willis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 08:35 am:

Thinking the same thing Willis.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 08:45 am:

Did somebody say nest?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Horlick in Penn Valley, CA on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 10:34 am:

I've heard of folks putting sawdust in a transmission to quiet it down enough to get it sold. Steve, it looks like your mouse has managed to quiet down your transmission, and engine!

TH


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 11:24 am:

That ain't no nest, that's a mouse hotel for every visiting mouse in the county!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Martin on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 01:22 pm:

Thanks for the information, I'll check the mixture setting & try the recommended spark advance settings & let you know what happens.
Thanks To All!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 01:27 pm:

The reason the exhaust manifold is getting hot is because the fuel is burning after it is in the exhaust. This condition is usually caused by retarded timing, however, you could have a misfire on one or more cylinders and the unburnt fuel is going out into the manifold on the exhaust cycle. Either way the fuel burns in the manifold.

Try ,as posted above, starting with the spark lever all the way up and then advancing it at least half way after it starts. If you have a working magneto, switch the ignition to magneto soon after starting. Do this in neutral at a slow idle. Also adjust the fuel mixture. As the engine warms up you might need to further adjust the fuel mixture. If it still runs rough, you might have an ignition problem where it is not firing on all cylinders.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RE Helgeson on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 02:02 pm:

Remove spark plugs and lay them on the head. You should get all four coils to buzz in 2 complete revolutions of the crank. When a coil buzzes you should see one of the plugs sparking. If this is the '15 from Shipshewana I would guess you might have ignition issues in cylinders 3 and 4. Just a guess on my part.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 02:41 pm:

Generally it's the lack of fuel cause the manifold to glow. The still burning fuel exits the valve over heating it and the valves. You need a mixture that's a little on the rich not too lean side, the unburnt fuel helps cool the valves and manifold.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RE Helgeson on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 03:24 pm:

Maybe I should give a better explanation. If you have a cylinder that does not fire it will load up on fuel and push the fuel into the manifold on the exhaust stroke. This can cause the fuel to burn in the exhaust Manifold.

I would first check to make sure all cylinders have spark. If not you can swap coils around in the coil box to see if the non-sparking plug moves. If it does not you should check the plugs the same way. It could also be a bad plug wire or a carbon arc in the coil box. I would check these things first. However you are getting good advise from everyone.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willis Jenkins on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 08:24 am:

Sounds like it would be easier to just move the spark plugs and wires than moving the coils around. You will still find the bad coil, wire or spark plug.

Willis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RE Helgeson on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 03:30 pm:

You could just move the plugs. Sometimes a coil isn't seated in the coil box. That is why I move the coils. Plus gives me a look at the inside of the box. Moving the plugs would work just the same.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 04:01 pm:

pic


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willis Jenkins on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 08:02 pm:

Mark,

Nice illustration! Thank you

Willis


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration