Battery shut off

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Battery shut off
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carey on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 10:21 am:

I would like to install a battery shut off on my 23 touring. I have a fuse in line at the starter switch. I wonder where and what to use. I understand that the blue knob ones at the battery are no good for the 6 volts. ???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 11:29 am:

Tom

with a fuse in the main line to your fuse block, you really don't need a battery cut off switch.

If you do add a cutoff, you will almost certainly eventually kill your generator when the switch fails and opens the circuit between the two while driving.

It sounds like a smart addition to a "T" but it really isn't


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 04:21 pm:

It would be more work, but better for the system to remove the ground cable at the battery post whenever you want to turn off the electricity. I have had the experience with the cutoff switch that the switch failed on a tour and I had to start on magneto because everything else was out of service. Also you don't know when it is going to happen and a generator without a battery will overload the generator and burn the generator out. If you have the lights on when it happens, the bulbs will burn out. If you put a fuse in the circuit where the hot wire leaves the starter switch, you will protect everything except the starter. And you can carry along spare fuses or bypass the fuse if it burns out. You still run the risk of frying the generator if the fuse blows while you are driving.

You don't need to disconnect the battery when you park the car if you take a look at the ammeter. If it reads discharge when you turn off everything, you know you have an electrical problem and if it stays at zero you do not have a problem.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lenney Glenn on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 04:47 pm:

I think you should keep all wiring in good condition and forget about a fuse or switch. I have learned that any "feel good" thing that I add to a model t usually creates a "sore spot".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 06:22 pm:

I installed a cut-off switch because of all the horror stories of antique cars and fire. _But in practical terms, it's good because when spectators, who are invited to pose in the car with their kids, accidentally step on the starter button, nothing happens.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jay on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 06:30 pm:

This is what I use and haven't had any problems.

https://www.amazon.com/Post-Battery-Master-Disconnect-Switch/dp/B001N729FS/ref=s r_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1490739934&sr=8-3&keywords=battery+kill+switch+for+car


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 08:16 pm:

I use something like Jay has.

The only problem is the clock I don't have stops, I loose presets on the radio that does not exist, and the engine computer I can't find looses its programming.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Chochole, Oswego, IL on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 08:24 pm:

I have used what Jay used and it does the trick.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 09:12 pm:

That looks like the one I used the day I had to run on magneto. The switch is so close to the battery that eventually some acid works its way into the switch and corrodes the contacts and then the switch will fail.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 09:13 pm:

That looks like the one I had on my car when it failed. The switch is so close to the battery that eventually some acid gets into the switch and corrodes the contacts.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matt cwynar on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 09:17 pm:

I use the one jay uses too and when I unscrew it out it sits right in the thumb hole for the rear floor.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 07:09 am:

I have talked to hundreds of folks about electrical issues. These things are just future troubles and gain you nothing. Model T's were NOT cars known to burst into flames. Common sense and a single 25 amp fuse installed in the solid yellow wire at the starter foot switch will protect your low current wiring which is what is going to fail if there is a short in the car wiring. These brass paint "plated" switches are pure junk and cause nothing but problems. Answer my phone for a week and you won't put one on your T. Put in a single 25 amp fuse in a good weather proof housing as close to the foot switch as practical and you are well protected and NOT installing a future problem.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 08:08 am:

I use this

never had a problem in 6 years use it to disconnect power when other people are in or around my T


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