Model T subcultures...what is yours?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Model T subcultures...what is yours?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 01:21 pm:

There's speedster freaks, snowmobile addicts, slow-boy TT guys, pedantic factory "correct" guys, the snobby early brass upper class, etc. etc.

What is your Model T subculture?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 01:35 pm:

Drive it until the wheels get loose, fix it, drive it some more!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 01:38 pm:

Ts as daily drivers and for "overlanding". I also have a soft spot for WW1 T armoured cars :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth in Alabama on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 01:45 pm:

I fall firmly in the Speedster Freak category. But if I had more money I could be in the Snobby Early Brass Upper Class. Lol


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Govoni on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 01:52 pm:

I think I'm in the hope to get it running soon class. Ha!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 01:57 pm:

Antiques and steam! :-) Fixing other peoples cars A and T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 02:03 pm:

My Name is David, I am a Model T Addict.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 02:06 pm:

OK Mark, I'm also addicted to Model As, Brass anything, Anything Steam, toy trains and player pianos. I need a mentor!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 02:20 pm:

I was infected with the T virus as an infant. The TT I now have (an '18) was first introduced to the family a year before I was born. My first ride in it was as a baby in my mothers arms. It was downhill from then on.

While I love the ol' truck for what it is, it also represents an important and irreplaceable piece of family history.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 02:30 pm:

David - In your post above, if one were to substitute the word "sailboats" for player pianos, it'd be a perfect description of "MY" subculture! Not that I don't like player pianos,....and I like music, but I just simply have no musical ability at all! I've always said, steam engines of any kind or size, sailboats, and old Fords, not necessarily in that order, and that's ME!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 02:35 pm:

All of them. :-)

I like mostly correct appearing cars, authentic looking speedsters/racers, TTs, Brass, Black, Nickel, etc.

The only thing I'm NOT into is natural wood finish and wrong colors...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Luke----central TX. on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 02:35 pm:

I'm with Robert in the hope to get it running soon class.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don - Conroe, TX on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 02:47 pm:

Anything pre-1970ish that's showing where it's been and what it's done.

Not into the current "patina" craze, but prefer original paint cars and trucks that are still wearing 75% or more of their original paintjobs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 02:56 pm:

Harold, I think sailboats and model T's sort of go together. Got rid of my SB a few years back but now thinking again, sure miss those sailing days on the ocean.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 03:02 pm:

I like T's with factory bodies, original color paint and good running & driving cars. Safety accessories are a must, like extra brakes, stop lights, turn signals help, etc. I also like Ford Woodies & have a '49.

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 03:16 pm:

How early does the brass have to be before you can be snobby about it ? Or are all '09 thru '16 owners automatically snobs ? (Snobby is as snobby does regardless of one's preferences)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 03:18 pm:

I seem to be a Model T sub something because I spend a lot of time under the T.

OK - I am a family T guy -
Grandkids to the ice cream stand
Wife to get coffee.
Son for an excuse to do something with him
When I work on it I think of the times I spent with my dad working on it!

Like my dad - I want to keep it as original as possible.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 03:47 pm:

I have found many ways to enjoy a model T from one extreme to the other. Restoring, preserving, making parts, painting pictures of them, racing, running out of gas, driving them til something breaks or whatever. The bottom line for me is to have fun with it and not take it too seriously. As Stan Laurel said "Life isn't short enough.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 03:59 pm:

Harold,
Sailboats, Steamboats, both in the same "subculture"--it's not IF you get there, it's how you go about getting there! And in your neck of the woods there is, or was, a lot of Steamboaters. Also, most steamboats share hull design with sailboats, hulls designed to go through the water, not push the water!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 04:11 pm:

Pedantic- of, relating to, or being a pedant Ľa pedantic teacher


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 05:30 pm:

Doodlebugs, conversion tractors, power units, saw rigs, any farm or industrial equipment made from a T (or A).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth in Alabama on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 05:38 pm:

Rich I think the brass snob scale increases inversely with the year. '15 folks are the least and the snobbishness goes up as the years go down.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 05:53 pm:

I'm a sucker for anything that burns acetylene up front, oil in the back, and in between has artillery wheels, a flat wooden dashboard, sizzling coils, mysterious levers & pedals, diamond-tufted upholstery, lots and lots of brass, an absence of front doors, smells of 3-in-1 oil, starts with a crank, shakes like Tina Turner, makes blue smoke and goes kisskisskisskisskisskiss.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 05:55 pm:

Seth, I haven't had that experience, I have a '13, but I would feel pretty bad if that automatically made me a "snob". See, I tend to love 'em all !!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walt Berdan, Bellevue, WA on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 05:57 pm:

I'm kind of Schizo it all depends on the day and the tour.

The speedster is probably my favorite as I built it up from a bare frame. Not as era correct as some prefer but all mine and a lot of fun. Will go plenty quick, stops well, steers well and looks cool (IMO). The power is T with a few tweaks, the stop, steer and lighting are more modern.

Then there is a nice early '26 coupe. Stock except for a Stipe cam, Z head, Stromberg OF, and horrors an E-Timer to manage the coils. OK and a Henry approved Ruckstell with some slightly improved mechanical brakes. Really a fun car to tour with other T's or just when choosing the slow lane.

My first T was a bitsy 23-25 touring that stayed stock except for brakes and a distributor. Lots of fun for 30 years but something had to leave to make room for my wife's 544 Volvo. Oh, it's fun too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 07:59 pm:

For me, it is the era. A very short time in human history where the greatest "single generational leaps in human history, both technological, and sociological", were made. For a few thousand years, before the mid 1890s, many discoveries, developments, and inventions, scientific, and sociological, did happen. Without those developments, the leap of the twentieth century could not have happened. Things like steam power (leading to both ships and trains), the telegraph, and artistic endeavors, made wonderful strides in both quality of life, travel and communication.
While the leap of the twentieth century could not have happened without these, and hundreds of smaller developments. On their own, their change to society as a whole was slow, and limited to a small percentage of people and their lives.
Prior to 1890, entertainment was live. It was limited to major theaters, travelling bands or individual artists, and whatever family or local group was performing. There was no recorded, nor broadcast, entertainment. Light at night was from the moon, or by fire of some burning oil or gas. Steamships were faster and more reliable than sailing ships. And, like trains were limited to where they were, as was telegraph and early telephone systems. The effect to the daily life of most people in the world, hadn't changed much in a hundred years. Most people lived and worked on small farms, or little towns that provided social connection, goods, and limited services, for all those people. The two thousand years before that, changed at an even slower rate.
By 1925. It was all different. About 1/3 of all people in the world, lived quite differently. Even South America, Africa, and Asia had been been touched by it. Most of the people in the world had at least seen an automobile, and knew of a world beyond what thirty years earlier they would have not known about. More people now worked in factories, and the businesses that supported the factories, than worked the family farm. Instead of horses and oxen, millions upon millions of people drove automobiles for daily transportation. And every day, millions of people watched movies, listened to radios, and phonographs.
Between the mid 1890s, and the mid 1920s, more or less, thirty years, was the leap from civilized man of olde, and modern man.
As both a "cause" and an "effect" of that leap, the automobile (and especially the model T Ford) is the ultimate icon of that leap.
I love the automobiles, the movies, and the music, along with the hundreds of technological stepping stones, of that era.
I think, as much as anything else, I also love the work ethic, morality (yes, there were a lot things where mankind did need to grow wiser), and the determination to make a "better world" for the generations that followed. Greed and corruption have always been with us. But given how out of control that has become in the past half century? I do not think the people of today could have accomplished that leap now.
I think I better shut up now. Beginning to drift too much.
However, and whichever, you prefer. Enjoy those model Ts, and what they represent.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 09:07 pm:

Anything to do with antique machinery
Of all kinds
Repairing tinkering and sharing
Other black powder rock bangers and cannons


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 10:07 pm:

My Model T subculture: Keep it original (or close to it) and drive all you can.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison - Rice, Minnesota on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 10:07 pm:

My T's are the only hobby I've had that I've stayed with. I had Model trains, a few semi-expensive guitars, did some oil painting, woodworking, stained glass and have had cars from every decade from the 1920's to 2011.

I've got a Corvette out in the garage that I have very little problem ignoring. Every so often I take an old harmonica out of my pocket and make some noise with it.

I don't drink or smoke and do very little traveling. I don't care to have a woman in my life. It's not that I don't like women but after being married 33 years but with only the first 15 of them happy I've got very little desire to put myself in that situation again.

I like guns and shooting. I don't hunt. I like to go fishing with my brother or my son but not both of them at the same time.

I like most domesticated animals though I know enough to stay away from horses because they don't like me. I don't care to have snakes or rats around me. I eat too much and spend too much time in front of the television.

When it's all said and done, I like my Model T's the most. I love driving my '22 Touring around the neighborhood and talking about it to anyone who'll listen. It's got the same paint they smeared on it and the same interior they put in it back in the 1950's and being around it makes me happy.

I also enjoy tooling around in my little yellow Speedster. I don't know or care if it's era-correct to any particular decade. I know I get a kick out of people that seem to not be able to resist taking their telephone out of their pocket and videoing or photographing me when I'm out driving it.

I really don't care what color your wheels are or if your motor is the correct year. I can't afford nor do I want a Model T built before 1917. I can't imagine spending driving time polishing brass. P

I hope I have my Model T's until it's time for me to take the never-ending dirt nap. After that, ???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Prochko on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 10:26 pm:

I'm more of a "time period" fellow than a strictly Model T guy. Orthophonic Victrolas, records, battery radios, furniture, appliances, even period wall papers are my hobbies. My last project was a little bungalow. I hope that my next will be a Flivver, if I can comfortably fit in to one...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Fischer - Arroyo Grande, CA on Thursday, March 30, 2017 - 12:06 pm:

Wayne,

I wish I'd said that. Your post expresses my sentiments exactly. Only I'm not as articulate as you.

My brass T was inherited from my father. So ownership is an accident of birth. Hopefully that exempts me from snobberhood.

Dick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Thursday, March 30, 2017 - 12:15 pm:

I pretty much meet the criteria spelled out by Steve Jelf. I probably also fit into the Slow-Boy TT Guy category. And a lot of you on here have categorized me as a Pedantic Factory "Correct" Guy, although I'm not as bad as some of you would have others believe.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Thursday, March 30, 2017 - 12:18 pm:

Wayne: you reminded me of an old college professor.
He always said "The rate of change is changing at an ever increasing rate!" then he would ask "Are we running away with ourselves?"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Linus Tremaine on Thursday, March 30, 2017 - 12:24 pm:

Camping! Pop ups, tents, folding camp tables, canvas, wood, metal. Stoves, lanterns, cots, dog carriers, ice boxes, running board racks, water/oil/gas service units.
Travelling and using old cars for every day purposes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James G Fisher III Peachtree City, GA on Thursday, March 30, 2017 - 01:07 pm:

I love the taste of rust and dirt dobbers. Feel sad when their all gone and I have to paint :-(


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, March 30, 2017 - 02:51 pm:

David Dewey - You found another way to say what most of us have heard before, and what probably could have, or should have been, a "favorite quote" on my profile, and what certainly applies to antique and classic cars (especially Model T's) and sailboats:

"Sometimes, the journey itself "IS" the destination!"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, March 30, 2017 - 03:13 pm:

I'm a speedster freak that also loves to learn about the hows and whys these cars were made like they were from the factory - and how life was back then when they were used.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, March 30, 2017 - 03:25 pm:

David Dewey - You mentioned "steamboats" in your post, which reminded me of something which has provoked an interesting "thought" and memory:

Yes David, there are steamboats and "steamboaters" in "my neck of the woods"!

(.....and by the way, Steve Jelf is right when he says, when you get old enough, like me, and Steve, it seems that everything somebody says reminds you of something.)

Years ago when my four boys were small, I heard about some sort of a steamboat "regatta" to be held somewhere in N. Seattle. So long ago that I don't quite remember where it was, I just remember "somewhere" on Lake Washington. I took my youngest son with me to that (the other three were not interested enough to go) and to this day, it has become one of the most memorable days I have ever spent! It was a group of a dozen or more little steam launches, many were similar to the one you had David, and Eric and I actually ended up cruising around the north end of Lake Washington with a nice old fellow that had invited us aboard to go for a ride with him. And that's only one of the reasons that it was such a memorable experience for me. I was so impressed by the "comraderie" displayed by that man and all the others, and it would compare with the sort of folks involved in our Model T hobby. They were a great bunch, all of them, and I'm sure that the old fellow that took us with him has long forgotten my son and I, but we'll never forget him! In fact, I often think of that old fellow whenever I take someone for a ride in one of my T's, and hope that maybe I've provided a memory or two for a few others, especially the few really interested kids that I've run across.

Didn't mean to start "rambling", but it's pretty neat, how a bunch of folks with a common interest, no matter what it is, seems to bring out the best in all of us,.....at least it seems that way to me!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis R on Thursday, March 30, 2017 - 03:28 pm:

I like em' with lots of patina! My old Light Express Delivery would have probably "whistled Dixie" in the wind if it could have gone that fast. I like survivors, make them safe and drive them. I don't care much for trailer queens and non driven show cars. I like to be able to drive them without having to worry about getting a scratch or stone chip. On my cars that usually just knocks some of the rust off, which heals by itself. Is that great or what?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Thursday, March 30, 2017 - 03:53 pm:

I love 'em all, if they're reasonably authentic. (I draw the line at T-buckets and rat rods.) I own brass, because I tour with the Horseless Carriage Club. I just sold a '13 runabout and bought a '14 touring so I could give rides to more people. I've taught people from 16 to 60 to drive my Ts. I drive in the rain, and I drive on dirt roads. If that makes me a snob, I'll bear the title proudly!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul iverson freeport ill. on Thursday, March 30, 2017 - 04:56 pm:

I like em well used the perfect cars I walk right past! I appreciate the workmanship and skill but it's not interesting to me.I grew up in the family junkyard around old cars but our 16 was in my grandpas garage long before I was born. Every visit I would spend playing in the T it was the only car my dad would not sell! My dad and me had big plans to take it home and use it but he worked 7 days a week when he sold the yard in 74 and had the time I didint! I finally found the time! with the help of this forum it's running great! I wish my dad lived to see it at least my 99 year old uncle can enjoy rides!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Friday, March 31, 2017 - 12:49 am:

"Clunkers are cool" (my T subculture). About town I say "Hundred year old junk!" They have no idea what I'm... A couple of 'em do.
Patina shmatina. I like rust. It's what I know. Ya rub yer hand across a fender and it's a bit rough yet smooth. Mmmm. :-) I am a patina lover, I just wanted to say shmatina.
I do like perfection. I like my Crappy non perfect stuff tho.
Otherwise if it has a motor, an engine or a hydraulic pump on or under it? I'm in. Bad. My 1953 motor-grader that used to work for the ND Hwy. Dept. needs a "paint-lift" not a paint job. Get it?
Paul (right above), If I've never said before, I just love that picture of your Fords!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, March 31, 2017 - 01:24 am:

Harold,
Yep, steamboaters are usually a great bunch, just like T folks. I've met and talked with some of the "giants" of the old days in steam, and they were just 'regular folks."
Seems to be true in quite a few "special interest" folks; Recently a guy I knew only as a neat silent film & projector expert passed away, and then I discovered he was VERY significant in the silent film preservation community and his obit was written up in The New Yorker! I didn't have a clue!
Perhaps it should also be said of our lives that, "It's not the destination, but the journey that's important."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, March 31, 2017 - 01:43 am:

My T interest came from rooting through barns and out along fence
lines. T's are just part of a MUCH larger "fabric" of old and cool that
is the reason I get up in the morning. A "barn fresh" vehicle ALWAYS
trumps a pristine restoration. A vehicle used as a regular old car or
truck ALWAYS trumps a show queen.

Got no use for the contrived car show, LOOK AT ME! scene. Just
drive 'em like they were meant to be used and perhaps inspire others \
to celebrate the Golden Age of Americana.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carl Sorenson-Montrose,CO on Friday, March 31, 2017 - 11:46 am:

I like Colorado narrow gauge Steam Locomotives , all the sounds and smells that go along with them..Growing up in the SoCal surf subculture of the 60's ,Ford Woodies with flatheads is what we cruised around in ..I have a 1948 (same as me) Station Wagon..As of a few weeks ago a T has been taking up a space in the barn...1926 Touring.It was my sisters,she wanted me to bring it here from SoCal ...It hasn't run in 11 years,but got a buzz out of three coils yesterday..I ordered a battery for it and will pick it up today...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Raynor in Southampton on Friday, March 31, 2017 - 02:27 pm:

Orginal unrestored brass T would be the holy grail. Till I can find and afford that "level" of car I will be working on getting this Canadian 15 as close to orginal as possible. Show it ,then DRIVE it!Picture my wife is standing next to the third owner and it's in the daylight for the first time in 22 years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond-Forest, Va on Friday, March 31, 2017 - 07:38 pm:

I love 'em all, but my main focus has been pre-T. I had a 26 roadster but sold it several years ago. Anyway they are as close as I can make 'em. My Miller Ford speedster will be post-T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eddy Lee Emerson on Saturday, April 01, 2017 - 12:26 pm:

David, When you find your mentor, I need to borrow him also. I too am crazy about A's and T's. For a number of years I operated a band instrument repair shop, so I've pounded out dents and polished a lot of brass. Next month our Model T club has a tour scheduled to the Pawnee Steam Tractor show, which I have attended many times in the last fifty years. My toy trains include Marx, Lionel and Ives. Over the years I have repaired a number of player pianos for other people, and accumulated a house full of players that I intended to restore when I retired. Then I suffered a stroke and all plans have changed. I now have an extra house that I can't sell because it is full of player pianos. I see that you also have a theater organ. I have never had one of those, but at one time I owned the Cremona Orchestral J photo player. which came from the Perry Opera House. To bad we don't live closer, I suspect we would be good buddies. Ed


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie Spokane, WA on Saturday, April 01, 2017 - 12:49 pm:

My thing is to make T's with minimum modifications run really well, and then run them.

The Montana 500 dovetails nicely with this.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Blanchard on Saturday, April 01, 2017 - 01:12 pm:

If I had a subculture it would be "expedition". Using ones T to go to hard to reach places, maybe an archeological expedition, and preparing the T for such adventures... ala Wonderwall.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Pat Kelly Montana on Saturday, April 01, 2017 - 01:58 pm:

I'm with you Robert, our Rocky Mountain club does a lot of back country trips. Period correct roads.
My other illness is old tractors and flywheel motors. I'm working on getting this 1925 12-20 Case cross motor unstuck right now. I think I'll leave it in it's work clothes and just get it running.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, April 01, 2017 - 02:30 pm:

Eddy,
I don't know if we would be such good buddies--most of my trains are American Flyers!! :-)
I am starting to worry about getting my player pianos done before something happens to me (and the model Ts too!). When I finish the house and pianos, I will have 3 pianos, one reed organ and an upright talking machine in our 1,500 sq ft house. Walk around? What on earth for?? :-)
Photoplayer ! Had a friend decades ago in Medford OR, Dennis McMenamy, who had a 4 cabinet photoplayer in his basement music room. Wow!!
Well, have to go work on the brakes on my everyday truck, later!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Saturday, April 01, 2017 - 04:42 pm:

Pat, I'm with you on leaving that sweet little Case in it's workin' clothes. Now after 20 years, the paint job on my Twin City 17-28 looks like heck.
Shoot, anytime they get painted, (tractors or gas engines) they never run as good any more. There is some truth to that statement. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Sunday, April 02, 2017 - 12:13 am:

Harold,

The steam launch regatta you mentioned was held on Lake Washington for a number of years. Sadly the steam guys have either passed on or sold their steamers. One participant was Horace Nelson from Edmonds.

Horace also sported a 1913 Stanley Steamer Touring and often participated in HCCA meets around the Pacific Nothwest.

I had the pleasure of riding in the steam launch and his Stanley. He was a grand old guy who took the time to actually talk to a kid.

just sayin'

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, April 02, 2017 - 12:53 am:

Upon returning from AFG (where the decision was made to finally
hunt down a TT), I contacted old insulator collector friend John Williams
to discuss T's and how to go about finding what I wanted. He invited
me up to his place for a ride and "primer". Upon arrival, he said he had
just painted the wheels for his '15 and we went downstairs to a room
full of fumes to have a look. A wad of empty Rustoleum rattle cans were
all around, and I was instantly sold on the T as a vehicle that looked better
as a beater than it ever does as a pristine restoration. No $10,000 paint
jobs required. No $15,000 chrome bills, just a simple car that presented
better in "down on the farm" patina than it ever would with cubic dollars
thrown at it. It was perfectly fine to have dings, dents, rust, and dirt. In
fact, it was better !

I enjoy my TT more than I do my other cars that are 100x more work and
money to make "nice". A 1950's car looks like a white trash beater when
not kept squared away. The T looks best when a little tattered and worn.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Thomas on Sunday, April 02, 2017 - 07:24 am:

I never thought about "sub culture" before, but it makes sense.

I bought my old wooden sailboat from a guy I met at an old car lunch. Sight unseen for the cash that happened to be In my wallet. That guy owned a Model T too. So I would say that there is an old wooden boat-Model T connection.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Murray on Sunday, April 02, 2017 - 09:42 am:

After WWII my dad and one of his brothers formed a partnership to take over my granddad's building construction business; their older brother had operated a dirt and demolition business since before the war, and their brother-in-law moved buildings and hauled industrial heating oil for American Oil in the winter. One thing my dad and uncles had in common was the ability to take someone else's cast-off equipment and squeeze a few more years of life out of it, and I grew up in the 50s and 60s in and around that war surplus and post-war junk.

In a lot of ways the "good old days" weren't actually that great, but there was some amount of satisfaction in waking that old stuff up and coaxing it to continue doing what it was built to do...I guess you can get addicted to the smell of hot oil and exhaust fumes, and the sound and feel of those old low RPM engines running. So I guess my sub-culture is the heritage of rural poverty.

I got my first Model T last fall, after hearing my dad tell stories about them for as long as I can remember...my granddad drove Model Ts for over a decade after they went out of production, and Dad, born in 1926, grew up tinkering on them and always claimed they were a perfect design except for one flaw - they wouldn't go fast enough! Now that I've retired I wanted to have the Model T experience first-hand!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jesse L. Ashcraft on Sunday, April 02, 2017 - 09:44 am:

When Carly Simon recorded "Your so vain" in 1972, I thought the song was about me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Sunday, April 02, 2017 - 12:00 pm:

Actually You're So Vain was about me.

I am sick of always owning cars with lots of patina.
I especially like speedsters and MGB roadsters... without patina!
I spend too much time ballroom dancing so all my cars still have lots of patina, even my '26 touring.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Sunday, April 02, 2017 - 12:43 pm:

brass car guy - Sorry to hear the steam launch regatta thing is apparently no more on Lake Washington. I can't help thinking, from what you said, that I'll bet the "Horace Nelson" fellow you mentioned is the very one who provided my Son and I with the memory of such a wonderful afternoon on Lake Washington in a real, honest-to-goodness steam launch!

Also, another thought that this thread has "provoked" is the tendency for so many of us Model T guys to gravitate toward the same types of things,......especially "antique" type things of a mechanical nature. Besides the Model T's and other antique and classic autos, antique toy trains, such as Lionel/American Flyer, antique power such as steam engines, whether in autos, boats, railroad, or skidding logs out of the woods, and then there are the old record players, radios, player pianos, etc, etc.

Also, about 50 years ago, as a young man, car-pooling to work in the Chicago area when I was a draftsman, working for International Harvester, I got to know an IH engineer that belonged to a club who's membership basically focused on the removal, salvaging, restoration, etc. of so many of the theater pipe organs from out of all of the many pipe organs that at that time ('60's) that still remained in old Chicago theaters that still existed since the long-gone silent film days. Roland Frase was this IH engineer that lived near me in Roselle, Illinois, and he had a one-car garage, that was absolutely FULL of all of the pipes and components of a pipe organ that he'd planned on restoring. As I remember, Roland's problem at the time was that he needed a much bigger house to actually rebuild and reassemble that pipe organ. Having left the Chicago area in '72, I completely lost touch with him, but I wonder whatever happened to him and that theater pipe organ???

Well, again, I'm just "rambling" now (sorry) but this thread does sort of provoke such memories,..... harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Sunday, April 02, 2017 - 12:48 pm:

O.K.,...one other "thought" from my "aging" and ever-wandering mind, and then I'll shut up:

It just occurred to me, the strange similarity of the good natured "rivalry" between Ford and Chevvy guys, power boat ("stink-pot") and sailboat guys, and Lionel and American Flyer guys! Strange, huh?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Sunday, April 02, 2017 - 02:19 pm:

My name is Tony. I am a addicted to Model Ts.....
My first T was purchased in Duluth Mn 41 years ago and it still runs, the picture was on the recent tour from Escondido.



In 1993 my daughter and son in law wanted to join the fun so we built a Speedster. Now my youngest grandson thinks it is his ....



I bought the 1914 Touring about 2002 and rebuilt so my family could use it in the Canadian tour in 2005. It is so easy to drive that I use it very frequently.



I also enjoy working on the mechanics of Ts, simple enough yet rewarding. This is a batch of starters I converted to 12 volt operation for club members.



So there it is, I enjoy rebuilding, driving and fixing them, I am addicted.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darren J Wallace, Woodstock,Ont. Canada on Sunday, April 02, 2017 - 04:13 pm:

Early brass cars(non-snobbish) daily drivers, restoring pre-1900 large cylinder musical boxes made by Nicole Freres, Lecoultre, Langdorf, Mermod,Palliard, dics boxes such as Reginas, Symphonions, Polyphons. Antique phonographs of all shapes and sizes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darren J Wallace, Woodstock,Ont. Canada on Sunday, April 02, 2017 - 04:19 pm:

Used to have a bunch of old engines too :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Sunday, April 02, 2017 - 10:10 pm:

I like model Ts that look nice and are mechanically dependable. I also am a model A ford freak and still have my first new Gt mustang I bought with 31k on it. I like them all but have been thinning the heard in the last 3 years. Some of the non running projects had to go... Tim


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