How to remove paint from synthetic leather tire cover.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: How to remove paint from synthetic leather tire cover.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Thursday, March 30, 2017 - 09:36 am:

Was given a spare tire cover for the War Wagon and, thile the intentions were good, the blue Ford logo on the fake leather or vinyl was probably not allowed by the military. I know it was banned during WWII with the jeeps not being stamped Willys or Ford on the rear panel after the first contract.

So, if I wanted to remove the Ford off the vinyl, but leave the rest alone and maybe stencil on U.S. or A.E.F. or something, how would I remove the existing paint? I guess, worse case, I could paint a block over it and then my stencil.

Thanks in advance.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Thursday, March 30, 2017 - 09:42 am:

Try the mildest solvent you can find first, something like mineral spirits.

Or, just spray the whole thing with Olive Drab vinyl upholstery dye.

https://www.semproducts.com/marine-refinish/vinyl-coattm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Thursday, March 30, 2017 - 09:47 am:

Steel wool.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Thursday, March 30, 2017 - 09:51 am:

If it was done right the imprint will be fused to the material and won't come off well. As Ignacio says, try steel wool (0000). If it comes at all, that will do it. If not, paint it over but be sure you're using a vinyl paint.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris from Long Beach, CA on Thursday, March 30, 2017 - 10:22 am:

My understanding is that brake fluid will remove paint. I would try a tiny bit on a detail brush to see it it softens the paint. IT might simply wipe off. Try a tiny test place and see, it's worth a try.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Thursday, March 30, 2017 - 10:48 am:

Remember whatever chemical you apply to the fabric has to be completely neutralized and removed or your new paint or logo will not properly adhere to the cover.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harry Courtneay on Thursday, March 30, 2017 - 11:21 am:

I have removed the blue logo on several tire covers with success using laquer thinner and very sparingly at that. If you use too much it may cause the material to break down. I wouldn't try brake fluid. It will remove paint but the results are always pretty unpredictable


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Thursday, March 30, 2017 - 08:58 pm:

I'll try the lacquer thinner and a little steel wool. My intent is to remove and leave the base vinyl alone.
Worse case is I don't have success with the logo removal or mess up the shade of the vinyl and have to paint it all, so I'll try the mild chemicals and steel wool and creep up on it.

Thanks to all. I'll report back with photos of before and after.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harry Courtneay on Thursday, March 30, 2017 - 09:23 pm:

I don't know that you'll need steel wool. When I removed them from my tire covers I just put the thinner on a rag and it practically wiped the logos off instantly


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Thursday, March 30, 2017 - 09:59 pm:

Try 3M Safest Stripper. A very mild paint stripper that takes longer than the harsher strippers, but with no harsh fumes or need for gloves, it is safe for virtually every application. I would just keep slopping it on until the paint started to dissolve. be patient, it will start to work after a few days and your vinyl will look as good as it did before the paint was applied. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Thursday, March 30, 2017 - 10:03 pm:

PS. I would not use steel wool on vinyl unless you don't mind a dull finish caused by tiny scratches left behind by the steel wool. I don't even use steel wool on wood as it leaves microscopic splinters of steel wire imbedded in the wood grain that are impossible to remove without sanding. It may do that to the vinyl as well. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond-Forest, Va on Friday, March 31, 2017 - 07:46 pm:

use lacquer thinner, 2 rags, one damp and one dry. Wipe the logo, if too wet dry quickly. Time exposure with lacquer thinner causes vinyl damage. A little at a time, then a broad quick wipe over the whole area. I've wiped many dealer logos off of Jeep tire covers. Do NOT use steel wool or coarse fabric. An old T shirt works best.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Saturday, April 01, 2017 - 12:05 am:

I agree that lacquer thinner is the fastest way to go, but to apply such a hot solvent to vinyl or any plastic, for even the briefest time, will damage the vinyl at the molecular level and shorten the life of the vinyl by several years. It may not be visible to the naked eye, immediately, but one day, you might go out there and find a long crack in your vinyl. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Saturday, April 01, 2017 - 02:49 pm:

Well, here is the run down ...
Soap and water does not work
Denatured alcohol does not work
Mineral Spirits does not work
Xylene does not work.
Lacquer thinner does not work.
Safe Strip paint stripper for one minute works...

but I now have a large grey patch wehre the tan vinyl color used to be.

Oh, well... I think I"ll paint the whole thing camo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Saturday, April 01, 2017 - 07:02 pm:

Tough stuff! Painting the whole thing sounds like a plan.

BTW, Xylene makes a great octane booster, plus it makes your exhaust smell great! I used to run a gallon of it per tank of gas in my 1970 Charger before I rebuilt the engine with lower compression pistons. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Saturday, April 01, 2017 - 09:58 pm:

xylene is $20 a gallon here in GA. I understand that it is banned in CA. We use it to thin the OD paint we painted our War Wagon with. If I put it in the gas tank, my wife will kill me.

It's bad enough I insist on ethynol free gas for the T and the WWII jeep. No glue in the carb for me!


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