TOURING front seat

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: TOURING front seat
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By rick howerton on Friday, April 07, 2017 - 09:28 am:

Has anyone ever figured out how to move the bench seat back, or take it out , and install a pair of bucket seats that can be moved back and forth?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, April 07, 2017 - 09:33 am:

On all model T touring cars the front seat was integrated into the body structure in a way that it can't be moved or taken out. If you need more room, then maybe the seatback springs can be modified/thinned out - or if it's the steering wheel that is in the way, then the steering column can be shortened with some effort.

Often it's enough to invest in a fat man steering wheel to make entering and getting out from behind the wheel easier.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Friday, April 07, 2017 - 09:35 am:

The thought of bucket seats in a Touring leaves a very unpleasant mental picture.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Friday, April 07, 2017 - 09:39 am:

Tommy, have to agree. Wow would that ruin not only the looks, but the value. Part of the fun of these cars is to "re-live" them in the way our fore-people did! Well, except in bitter cold and snowy weather!! I'm a "fair weather T'er"!! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Friday, April 07, 2017 - 09:57 am:

Rick, You might want to consider getting a Tudor sedan. They have bucket seats mounted on wood floorboards, and the seats can be moved back easily. Lots of others have done exactly that and it works quite well.

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By rick howerton on Friday, April 07, 2017 - 10:27 am:

I got one and I did what you said. Boy people were a lot smaller back then.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Friday, April 07, 2017 - 10:54 am:

You can give yourself a couple of inches more legroom by building a shallower wood structure behind the seat back, and by pulling down and tying back the seat springs to make the seat back cushion thinner.

pic


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By rick howerton on Friday, April 07, 2017 - 09:23 pm:

How about repacing the spring with 3in foam?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, April 07, 2017 - 09:51 pm:

You won't be happy with just foam, it doesn't last!
(Yeah, Old School here)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, April 07, 2017 - 11:48 pm:

It wouldn't be easy. But quite a lot of touring cars by Pierce Arrow, Studebaker, Hudson, Auburn (dozen or so others), built and sold touring cars and "chummy roadsters" (cloverleaf) with divided front seats, basically bucket seats. They were not "bucket seats" in the usually used sense that they were cheap or flimsy. They were in fact well built and usually solid parts of the touring body. Some cars had a passenger's front seat that could turn to face either forward of back toward the rear seat passengers. Some of these cars were really neat looking. I have even seen one after-market model T touring body that had such a front seat (don't remember offhand who built it?).

Such a thing could be built within a basic model T touring body. Because of size restraints, and the gasoline tank location, a walk between would not be advisable. But a turn around passenger's seat could be done, although a lot of figuring would be needed to make it look good and work well. A simpler idea, would be to move the gasoline tank back about six inches. A single driver's seat then could be made solid and set back about six inches, keeping the passenger's side seat about where it was before. That would leave access into the rear seat easy on the passenger's side, yet allow for a shall we say extra large driver with reasonable access from the passenger's side.
I saw a T once, with something like that. I can picture in my mind several possibilities that could look good and work well.

One point against. Such a project would most likely take more time, money, and effort than expected. And when you would eventually want or need to sell it? I have seen this many times with such alterations. Potential buyers almost ALWAYS say or at least think things like "why didn't you do it like this or that instead". Such altered vehicles are almost always difficult to sell. And they usually sell for a lot less than they would have if you had restored like original. That is just the way it is.
So be sure of what you want, and think about why you want it that way. If you truly plan to keep it for awhile? And will really enjoy it? Then maybe go for it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By rick howerton on Saturday, April 08, 2017 - 07:57 am:

I hate to sell her,I think I`ll try removing the back springs, and use foam in it`s place first. Thanks Guys


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